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A bit of advice in replacing my power supply

Last response: in Components
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August 2, 2011 8:17:20 PM

Hi all,

I'm thinking to replace my 300W ATX power supply and was wondering if I could use a 350W.

Before I get into specifics, I'm going to quickly describe why I am replacing it in case you guys have any comments. My computer was powering off (instantly, not OS) and I suspected it was overheating. I cleaned out the CPU heat sink and fan and replaced the thermal grease with Arctic Silver 5. Worked ok for a few weeks and the problem returned. Yesterday it shut istelf down, I restarted 10 minutes later, it ran for 20min, than froze rather than shutting down. The power switch in front (through MB I believe) would not power it down. Now when I power it all I get is fans. It does not POST. I looked over the MB and I saw that the 4 pin 12V connection (auxilary power) to the MB had two pins that were burned brown on both the cord and MB part. I'm hoping just the cord/power supply has gone bad and the motherboard/CPU is ok. (far fetched?)

Anyway, my current 300W psu is this:

http://support.gateway.com/s/POWER/WMEHP-P3087F3/WMEHP-...

it's an old gateway 508GE computer and I'm thinking of getting a cheap psu to replace it:

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

or to add a bit more power for USB drives etc.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

any suggestions?

Thanks in advance!


Gateway 508ge ------> http://support.gateway.com/s/PC/R/3724/4425cl2.shtml
Intel® (Augsburg) motherboard ------> http://support.gateway.com/s/MOTHERBD/Intel2/102007/102...
(Intel D915GAG I think, express chip set)
Pentium 4, ~3Ghz I think.
4GB ram
a c 91 ) Power supply
August 2, 2011 8:39:31 PM

Overheating is always the result of poor heat transfer.

To re-seat the CPU/heatsink, clean all contact surfaces using alcohol swabs. Then apply a small amount of Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound to both surfaces and spread evenly to obtain a thin layer of compound. Proceed with re-seating and tightening the fasteners in a cross (zig zag) pattern a little at a time until the proper tightening is obtained. Do not over tighten.

The Diablo PSU seems good at the advertised price, but I have no experience with those PSUs. I did read the reviews but I know nothing about the people who write those reviews.

For PSUs I choose Corsair.
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August 2, 2011 8:49:06 PM

Quote:
To re-seat the CPU/heatsink, clean all contact surfaces using alcohol swabs. Then apply a small amount of Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound to both surfaces and spread evenly to obtain a thin layer of compound. Proceed with re-seating and tightening the fasteners in a cross (zig zag) pattern a little at a time until the proper tightening is obtained. Do not over tighten.


cool. That's exactly what I did. However, the problem returned and something got a little cooked. I'm hoping the PSU went bad during the overheating. In general, can you upgrade a PSU to a higher wattage model or will you risk "overpowering" the MB or other devices?
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a b ) Power supply
August 2, 2011 8:53:04 PM

Get Antec earthwatt EA380D it's good
for systemu
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a b ) Power supply
August 2, 2011 9:05:25 PM

Being that the board and PSU connectors are brown it could be either part. The fact that the computer seems to power on and spin the fans does not really tell us that the issue is one part or the other. The fact that you pulled the heat sink suggests you might have bumped the ram or the sata connectors. Give the system a once over check every plug and make sure the ram is firmly seated. Many boards will exhibit the exact behavior your describing with no CPU installed at all or if the CPU is not seated correctly. Before you spend money you might consider reseating your CPU and heatsink.
If that does not work I would get a cheap PSU and try it. Go to newegg or tiger and get a 30-40 dollar 400+ watt. You could get a PSU tester but they cost the same a PSU.
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a b ) Power supply
August 2, 2011 9:08:27 PM

You can install any PSU you want. The computer will only draw what it needs. You just need to make sure that the mother board on that old gateway is a standard ATX so that the new PSU plugs in correctly. (my bet is the gateway is standard)
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a c 91 ) Power supply
August 2, 2011 9:16:06 PM

echo5 said:
Quote:
To re-seat the CPU/heatsink, clean all contact surfaces using alcohol swabs. Then apply a small amount of Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound to both surfaces and spread evenly to obtain a thin layer of compound. Proceed with re-seating and tightening the fasteners in a cross (zig zag) pattern a little at a time until the proper tightening is obtained. Do not over tighten.


cool. That's exactly what I did. However, the problem returned and something got a little cooked. I'm hoping the PSU went bad during the overheating. In general, can you upgrade a PSU to a higher wattage model or will you risk "overpowering" the MB or other devices?

You will never 'over power' anything by going to an oversized PSU. The devices, including the motherboard will draw only the power it requires; no more.

Like I mentioned, Corsairs are good PSUs. So are Antec, Silverstone, and some others.
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August 2, 2011 9:17:04 PM

thanks! I thought about getting the PSU tester, but since the fried cord is attached to the PSU and a cheap PSU is about the same price, as you said, I figured I'd just try a new PSU.

I read that the cord that was fried, the 12V 4 pin Aux power cord, actually supplies power to the CPU and that the CPU will not function without it.

I'm pretty sure the main power cord is a standard 24 pin ATX type cord.
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a c 91 ) Power supply
August 2, 2011 11:37:12 PM

Yes, get an ATX PSU - most PSUs are ATX, and the 24-pin connector is standard and has a key and a locking latch. Kinda hard to plug into the motherboard.
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!