Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

What PSU can I use?

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
April 19, 2012 10:15:23 AM

Hi I have the following system and the PSU has died.


CPU: Intel® Core 2 Quad Q9550
CPU Cooler: Coolermaster Hyper TX2
Motherboard: Asus P5Q Pro (Intel P45 chipset, Crossfire)
Memory: 8.0GB Corsair DDR2 800mhz XMS2 (4x 2GB)
Hard Drives: 1TB S-ATAII 3.0Gb/s
2nd hard drive: 500GB S-ATAII 3.0Gb/s
Optical Drive: 22x DVD±RW DL S-ATA Lightscribe
Graphics card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260 896MB
Sound card: Onboard 7.1 Audio
Operating System: No Operating System - I will install my own
PSU: 700W EZCool Tornado
Case: Antec Three Hundred


Can I buy any type of PSU as a replacemt?

Will the following be a good choice?

CIT 750w Gold 12CM Silent Atx Power Supply
by Colors IT

750W
Dual 12v Rails
ATX 12V Compliant for all Types of CPU and Mainboard
12cm Silent Fan
Gold Colour

Dual 12v Rails New Version Ver. 2.2 Silent and Better Ventilation ATX 12V Compliant for all Types of CPU and Mainboard 12cm Silent Fan

More about : psu

a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 19, 2012 10:21:48 AM

Buy an antec High current gamer 750W, or a Corsair PSU. both are very high in quality
April 19, 2012 1:39:40 PM

Ok thanks.

Does it matter what type of Corsair 700 or 800?
Related resources
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 19, 2012 3:49:41 PM

What is your budget ? You do not really need to pay attention to the watts as much as you do the 12 volt rails. For a gaming pc you should really get a minimum of 12v@45 or 50 amps for example see how this psu reads 12v@50a this one should be good

+3.3V@24A, +5V@24A, +12V@50A, -12V@0.5A, +5Vsb@2.5A

However this one if you look has 12v@22amp not good for gaming rigs.

3.3V@28A, +5V@26A, +12V1@22A, +12V2@22A, +12V3@25A, -12V@0.5A, +5VSB@2.5A

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Anonymous
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 19, 2012 10:40:40 PM

your system is using 425 watts under full load. your GPU is pulling 182 max.
any quality psu that is 500 watts with a CONTINUOUS 12v amperage of 26+ amps is good :) 


edited for typo
April 20, 2012 12:03:34 AM

Its good to buy a PSU that is rated close to double your typical load. I like Corsair PSU's. Any of the Corsair Series PSU's below are great. Choose a line depending on your modularity or efficiency requirements.

Here is an interesting video about the TX series PSU's: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-mexVbkjiw

TX series - non modular 80+ Bronze
TXM - semimodular 80+Bronze
HX - fully modular 80+ Bronze
AX - fully modular 80+ GOLD

Here is an interesting video about PSU modularity: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vm_2RG61hhk&feature=fvwr...

Here is an great video that details the differences and potential energy savings with different grade (i.e. 80+ Bronze vs 80+ GOLD) PSU's: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vnXNyh9vIg
It also reccomends buying a PSU rated about double your typical load since at 50% load is where the PSU is most efficient. (this varies with models but you can actually look at load/efficiency graphs for various models and they are typically most efficient around 50 - 60% load). For example the TX650 can be seen to be most efficient in this range by looking at how the bottom graph on the following page peaks around 50% load: http://www.silentpcreview.com/article813-page1.html

Here is a page about different lines/brands of PSU: http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx
Make sure you get a tier 1 or tier 2 PSU.
Anonymous
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 20, 2012 1:05:21 AM

geogolem said:
Its good to buy a PSU that is rated close to double your typical load.


huh?
its best to buy a PSU that is using 20% of its rated specs when the computer is idle. PSUs perform at their best efficiency between 20-80%. buying a psu that is not at/above 20% when the computer is idle it will be hotter and wasting electricity by not being as efficient.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_supply_unit_%28compu...
scroll down to Power rating
Although a too-large power supply will have an extra margin of safety as far as not over-loading, a larger unit is often less efficient at lower loads (under 20% of its total capability) and therefore will waste more electricity than a more appropriately sized unit. Computer power supplies generally may shut down or malfunction if they are loaded too lightly, less than about 15% of rated total load. Some power supplies have no-load protection.

then at Efficiency
It is important to match the capacity of a power supply to the power needs of the computer. The energy efficiency of power supplies drops significantly at low loads. Efficiency generally peaks at about 50–75% load. The curve varies from model to model (examples of how this curve looks can be seen on test reports of energy efficient models found on the 80 PLUS website).
April 20, 2012 1:21:42 AM

Anonymous said:
huh?
its best to buy a PSU that is using 20% of its rated specs when the computer is idle. PSUs perform at their best efficiency between 20-80%. buying a psu that is not at/above 20% when the computer is idle it will be hotter and wasting electricity by not being as efficient.


I don't necessarly disagree with you here, but you haven't actually stated anything in disagreement with what I said. I'll be slightly more specific. When buying a PSU it is beneficial to look at the efficiency vs load graph for that specific PSU and find a PSU that matches its highest efficiencies with your typical loads. In the case of the Corsair TX650 this is at about 50% load. Please look at the graph on the bottom of the following page: http://www.silentpcreview.com/article813-page1.html

I don't suggest buying a PSU that is rated more than double your typical load. that would be a waste of money not to mention inefficient but the ideal PSU load (at leat for most Corsair PSU's) is when they are at about 50% - 60% load.
April 20, 2012 1:24:16 AM

Anonymous said:


then at Efficiency
It is important to match the capacity of a power supply to the power needs of the computer. The energy efficiency of power supplies drops significantly at low loads. Efficiency generally peaks at about 50–75% load. The curve varies from model to model (examples of how this curve looks can be seen on test reports of energy efficient models found on the 80 PLUS website).


That peak you are referring to at about 50 - 75% load means that the optimal PSU wattage is best at about double your typical load. If the PSU is rated at double your typical load then at your typical load that PSU will be operating at 50% which is the peak.
Anonymous
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 20, 2012 1:27:41 AM

geogolem said:
That peak you are referring to at about 50 - 75% load means that the optimal PSU wattage is best at about double your typical load. If the PSU is rated at double your typical load then at your typical load that PSU will be operating at 50% which is the peak.


you are looking at full load specs and seem to be forgetting idle specs. a 750 watts psu would need an idle of 150 watts . .hell thats full load on my rig :) 

to repost:
"The energy efficiency of power supplies drops significantly at low loads. "
and most rigs idle more than on a full load.

EDIT: the OPS rig runs at 425 watts, run it though an online calculator if you want. to go by what you stated means he should be a 850 watts power supply . which low end means his system needs to draw 170 watts to stay efficient. it probably will idle under 100 watts . . .
April 20, 2012 1:35:09 AM

Anonymous said:
you are looking at full load specs and seem to be forgetting idle specs. a 750 watts psu would need an idle of 150 watts . .hell thats full load on my rig :) 

to repost:
"The energy efficiency of power supplies drops significantly at low loads. "

and most rigs idle more than on a full load.


Actually I'm not looking at the specs for any specific load. That graph actually shows how the efficiency varies with load.

I used the words "typical load". It really depends on your usage patterns. You want the PSU under "typical load" to operate at its highest efficiency.

If your typical load is idling then you want to find a PSU tat is close to double your idle power usage and exceeds your full load usage. Perhaps your typical load is a full load in which case you would want to buy a PSU that is about double your full load.

i.e. this depends on usage patterns. Perhaps you don't leave your computer on unless you are gaming. I don't know... this is why I used the words "typical load".

Again there are more variables at play because one would actually need to take into account the power lost due to inefficiencies when you are not at the typical load in either case etc. There are a ton of variables. A general rule of thumb is to buy a PSU with close to double your required usage.

To expand on your quote. In addition to dropping dramatically at low loads the efficiency of PSU's drops significantly at high loads as well.
Anonymous
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 20, 2012 1:39:27 AM

sorry i got a few things in front of me atm . that graph appears to be for ONE model put out by ONE manufacturer. i don't know if it is reliable/appropriate to use it for generalizations.
April 20, 2012 1:42:59 AM

Anonymous said:
sorry i got a few things in front of me atm . that graph appears to be for ONE model put out by ONE manufacturer. i don't know if it is reliable/appropriate to use it for generalizations.

Its ok - I know its for one model, specifically the TX650 but most Corsair PSU's are similar and it even corresponds with your statement of 50-75% loads are where they usually peak.

I think this video really offers the best insight: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vnXNyh9vIg
Anonymous
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 20, 2012 1:44:40 AM

sorry i can't watch that. he f*cking creeps me out and i want to strangle him.
April 20, 2012 1:47:15 AM

Anonymous said:
sorry i can't watch that. he f*cking creeps me out and i want to strangle him.


lol - np. In addition to energy efficiency the noise the PSU makes is also minimized when the PSU is operating most efficiently. If you check out that video at 2:45 (if the OP checks it out - you don't have to ;)  ) he basically reiterates what I've been trying to say.
Anonymous
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 20, 2012 1:59:07 AM

i am not disputing the "peak" efficiency level. i saw the need to point out to look at the low end of usage, when at idle; which would be overlooked if someone thinks, "oh since my system is 550 watts at full load, i need a 1100 watts psu."

which we both know is incorrect.

commercial is over. #wrestling matters
:lol: 
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 20, 2012 12:43:31 PM

PSU Expert wanna be's ;
Get yourselves a Killawatt meter, it may help you to better understand actual power consumption and the psu calculator.

Q9650 ( stock ) on an X48 board
GTX260 ( 65nm )
2x2 Gb Dominators ( 2.1v )
1 HD
1 OD
Couple led fans

Running the most power hungry virus available, OCCT's PSU Test ( 10 minute's )
326 watts AC ( 120v )
~84% efficient Corsair 620HX
274 watt DC load

Furmark 1.9.2
261 watts AC

Idle
106 watts AC

A 430 watt psu with dual 6 pin connector's would be more than sufficient for OP's specs
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... , not that he can order from Newegg, CiT isn't available in the US

Hmm, the calculator said 425w for the OP's spec

April 21, 2012 8:49:12 PM

I got a 750 Corsair - this thread was far too confusing for me guys!
!