Where do i put these pins?

i recently got a new case a thermaltake blackwidow or sopranors 101 i have no clue which is its name but i my old case had around 4 pins i had to plug in this has like 9 but my biggest problem is that theres one called power sw and im guessing thats the one for power? but where do i put it i tried with the regular 4 pin and 8 pin slots.

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13 answers Last reply
More about where pins
  1. One of those headers on the board should be labeled "front panel" or something of the sort; the power switch, reset switch, and front panel power and HDD activity LED's would connect there. As to which specific pins correspond to which connector, check your motherboard user manual.
  2. thanks do you know any sites where i can find user manuals for a gateway dx4350-ur21p? i seem to have lost it.
  3. SchizTech is right.If you look in the lower left corner of your motherboard, yow will see a connector/set of pins labeled 'f_panel',this is where they go. If this is a motherboard from a oem prebuilt (HP, DELL, etc) you may have to look at your old cace/cables to figure what will go where. Also look close at 'f_panel' there is possibly some small print indicating what goes where.

    Jim
  4. while there is a pin group named f panel each pin isnt labeled and the old case was more organized with the pins and they all came together into one big connector and i cant open up the case anymore to find out witch wires go to what slots. Atleast i know it goes in the f panel group i guess i will try every pin combo till i get it right. thanks guys.
  5. crap i have a new problem i found the right pins for the one called power sw. all the fans turn on like max speed but no starting windows and the monitor wont even un hibernate or whatever it does theres still one called reset sw does this need to be plugged in or is something else wrong now?
  6. No, the reset switch doesn't need to be in and yes, that's a new problem.

    Shut down the PC by unplugging it. Unplug every internal connection but the power connectors and the front panel power switch and remove and re-insert all the RAM. Try again.

    Is all you're doing moving the system into a new case? Check for a grounding problem (a piece of metal contacting where it shouldn't be). Take out the board and check the case stand-offs to make sure there is nothing where it shouldn't be.
  7. ok derp moment i had a aftermarket graphics card and i had my vga cable going to it but i forgot to plug power cables into the gpu *derp.
  8. ok apparently that just added to the problem ill try everything you said
  9. replugged and took the motherboard out and checked it. do you think the screws could make a grounding issue?
  10. no, they shouldn't
  11. i have no clue what im doing wrong i have tried everything suggested.


  12. would this create a grounding issue?
  13. I can't tell since it's out of the case (it's some metal part out of place under the board in the case that would be the issue). At this point you'd have to test the board outside of the case if possible, setting it down on a safe surface like an anti-static bag and only connecting power and a video output (if it starts that is, to see if you get video). If you know which two pins start the board, as you seem to have identified you can just jump them with a metal object like a screwdriver (touch both pins at once to create a connection between them).

    If there's a static charge on the board that re-seating the memory didn't resolve you can re-seat EVERYTHING including the CPU. If you get no power, try starting the board without the CPU just to see if you get any life at all. Unfortunately, it's hard to go further without other parts to test with (another compatible system to test your CPU in or another CPU to plug into your board, stuff like that).

    Bottom line, there's only so far we can go online since I can't see what you're seeing. If you still have a problem, try taking it to a local computer shop for a more thorough examination.
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