Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

I5 2500k high idle, and load temps?

Last response: in CPUs
Share
August 6, 2011 4:04:41 AM

Hey again!

Currently I am in a very hot area (90+) with humidity.. unfortunately no AC in my room!

Anyways, I am idling around 36-43C in Windows 7 with my brand new build(stock heatsink).

I loaded up Prime95 for the first time and after three hours I reached 85C, which we all know is horrible and a warning sign.
The four pins on the proccesor fan are flush, and pinned down correctly. Have not tried to apply grease or anything to the heatsink.

Should I purchase an aftermarket fan?I think I might as well because I eventually plan to OC, but these temps this early down the line is insane!

Any help, or tips would be appreciated!

Build.

Intel i5-2500k
Corsair Vengeange 8GB RAM
Coolermaster CM 690ii Advanced Case
Corsair EnthusiantTX750 750W PSU
ASUS GTX560 Ti GPU (1GB)
Hitatchi 1.5TB Harddrive
ASUS P8P67 Deluxe Motherboard
Plus 23" ASUS 1080p Monitor

Thanks in advance! :bounce: 
August 6, 2011 4:15:34 AM

I'm going to say you have environmental issues that are impacting your cooling. You can try moving more into the system, or some other form of cooling, but with the room itself being hotter than normal operating temperatures you're in a bit of a spot.
August 6, 2011 4:23:44 AM

MysticMiner said:
I'm going to say you have environmental issues that are impacting your cooling. You can try moving more into the system, or some other form of cooling, but with the room itself being hotter than normal operating temperatures you're in a bit of a spot.



True, I hate New York's summers.

But I imagined that 85C just in general is a huge red flag.
Related resources
August 6, 2011 4:35:54 AM

MysticMiner said:
I'm going to say you have environmental issues that are impacting your cooling. You can try moving more into the system, or some other form of cooling, but with the room itself being hotter than normal operating temperatures you're in a bit of a spot.


I agree, but only up to a point. A better cooling solution would of course help. However, your idle temps aren't too bad, especially for an extra hot space. 85C after 3 hours of Prime- not beautiful, but definitely not horrible or insane in that environment. You have no chance of getting close to that temp in everyday use.
When you start overclocking, DEFINITELY get a better cooler. But as long as you're on stock clocks you don't really have a reason to worry.
August 6, 2011 4:41:48 AM

85c is abut right for an intel quad core w/stock cooling at summer time. 85C woud fry an AMD chip, but apparently its ok for Intel, I believe Intel maxes out at 99c (correct me if I am wrong here).

Given that you already spent a good deal for that system, why not throw a little bit at an aftermarket cooler?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Great cooler if you don't mind a backplate swap and some screw work.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Best choice if you just want the same factory mounting system (push-pins).

The 212 is great if you want to push the 2500k past 4Ghz, but if you are going to stay bellow 4k than TX3 is enough.
a b à CPUs
August 6, 2011 3:49:46 PM

With those hot ambient temps, the TX3 and 212 Plus won't be enough. Both of those are good for a mild to moderate overclock (up to a max of 4.5GHz on Sandy Bridge) with normal ambient temps and minimal over-voltage, but they cannot handle real overclocks or high ambients like you are experiencing. You'll have to spend more money to get a bigger hunk of metal to dissipate the heat. I'd recommend something like the Cooler Master V6 GT as a minimum starting point.
August 6, 2011 4:08:47 PM

I am going to have to disagree. I have personal experience with using a TX3 on a friends 1055t (no mobo cut out and we didnt want to yank the mobo out of the case). With case temps of around 28C his temps dropped from 53C at stock (2.8GHZ) to around 50C at 3.5 GHz. With a hyper 212 I am sure he could go up to 4GHZ no problem.

TX3 is worthwhile upgrade from the tiny stock HS on the 2500k and it also great for directing hot air from the cpu out to of your case (instead of keeping the hot air in your case).

So no you dont need a Prolimatech Megahalems or close loop water cooler to get some good cooling for the 2500k if you dont plan on pushing it too far.
a b à CPUs
August 6, 2011 5:01:13 PM

whats is your case airlfow like, you could be starving the cooler of air to work with
a b à CPUs
August 6, 2011 5:17:14 PM

Ambient temps for the OP are 90ºF/32ºC or higher. That's a lot higher than normal room temp (which is 68ºF/20ºC).

I'm not saying OP needs a $100 heat sink -- I'm saying OP needs something better than a $30 heat sink. The Cooler Master V6 GT would the minimum I would recommend for the situation, given the high ambient temp and the desire to overclock.

People give the 212 Plus a lot more credit than it deserves. It's certainly a good heat sink for $30, but bigger hunks of metal can and do significantly outperform it.
August 6, 2011 11:43:36 PM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
Ambient temps for the OP are 90ºF/32ºC or higher. That's a lot higher than normal room temp (which is 68ºF/20ºC).

I'm not saying OP needs a $100 heat sink -- I'm saying OP needs something better than a $30 heat sink. The Cooler Master V6 GT would the minimum I would recommend for the situation, given the high ambient temp and the desire to overclock.

People give the 212 Plus a lot more credit than it deserves. It's certainly a good heat sink for $30, but bigger hunks of metal can and do significantly outperform it.



Last night when I tried prime 95, it was 85F in my room.

Now it is 73F in my room
And I'm idling from 35C-37C

And also, I am not suffocating the case. The case is in a semi-enclosed area (still plenty of room to breathe) in a CM 690ii case..
a b à CPUs
August 7, 2011 2:53:48 PM

Test #1: Go into the BIOS and leave it on the hardware monitoring page where it has the temps and voltages for an hour. Report back with the CPU temp and voltage after that hour.

Test #2: Install CPU-Z. Run Prime95 and watch the CPU-Z readout. Report back with the CPU speed and voltage.
!