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New cpu not reading

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August 8, 2011 11:50:35 PM

I'm trying to update my dad's desktop. It's a old Compaq Presario Sr1913wm. Amd athlon 64 3500+ 939 motherboard. The specs are below

PSU Rosville 450 watt
4gb crosair ram
raedon 5450 1gb graphic card
500gb hdd
latest bios v3.11

new cpu - AMD Athlon 64 x2 4200+ toledo 939 socket

i can get into the bios for bout 1 min and i can see the cpu specs but it also said, new hardware might not be detected. i reset the CMOS but still nothing. anyone has a clue? i really want to get this up and running. the cpu is still good. all pins are still attached. please help :( 

More about : cpu reading

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August 9, 2011 1:34:45 AM

Rosewill PSUs are not know to be great PSUs. Can you try to temporarily substitute another known good PSU?
August 9, 2011 1:49:01 AM

Ubrales said:
Rosewill PSUs are not know to be great PSUs. Can you try to temporarily substitute another known good PSU?


really? i read newegg and the reviews said it was good. what do you recommend? should i try the OEM one that came with the computer and see if it works? i really want to get this working! :( 
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August 9, 2011 1:59:52 AM

n00btech said:
really? i read newegg and the reviews said it was good. what do you recommend? should i try the OEM one that came with the computer and see if it works? i really want to get this working! :( 

I would suggest Corsair PSUs.

This one is 500 watts and $50 after MIR - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
August 9, 2011 5:17:23 PM

Ubrales said:
I would suggest Corsair PSUs.

This one is 500 watts and $50 after MIR - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...



can it really be the PSU? if it is, im going to see if i can return this PSU for the one you're suggesting. cause the Roseville PSU is brand new also.
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August 9, 2011 5:22:54 PM

n00btech said:
can it really be the PSU? if it is, im going to see if i can return this PSU for the one you're suggesting. cause the Roseville PSU is brand new also.

The symptoms sound like it is the PSU. And Rosewill PSUs leave a lot to be desired. In any event, you are better off with a known good brand like Corsair. After all, PSUs are at the heart of the system; just like an automotive engine.
August 9, 2011 5:31:09 PM

Ubrales said:
The symptoms sound like it is the PSU. And Rosewill PSUs leave a lot to be desired. In any event, you are better off with a known good brand like Corsair. After all, PSUs are at the heart of the system; just like an automotive engine.



Okay. Well Im going to RMA the Rosewill PSU back to Newegg and purchase the one you are suggesting. Hopefully this will make the CPU run! THANKS

If I have any other question, Ill be back here after the new psu is shipped to me :D 
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August 9, 2011 11:48:40 PM

Sure! We'll still be here! :) 
August 13, 2011 6:18:40 PM

Ubrales said:
Sure! We'll still be here! :) 



hey, i'm back. im not sure what it is this time. the PSU you suggested is working fine. can i use the factory cpu fan that came with the computer or do i have to buy a new cpu fan? i'm not planning to overclock or anything. just want to get the computer up and running for my dad. and can it be the thermal compound that i'm using also? what do you suggest? please let me know, this is really getting irritating :( 



EDIT: i took the heatsink off and cpu came right off with the heatsink!!! i double checked the cpu and 1 pin broke off!!!! is it possible to fix this one pin? and i still don't understand why it still doesn't work. i went out and bought AS5 thermal compound also and still nothing. it booted and everything loaded then it just died again. :cry:  :cry:  :cry:  :( 
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August 13, 2011 9:09:02 PM

Yes you can use the stock heatsink if you are not planning on overclocking.

Regarding the broken pin; it all depends on which pin is broken. Some pins are reduntant pins and some are not.

This is a useful checklist for trouble-shooting: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-ste...
August 13, 2011 9:51:28 PM

Ubrales said:
Yes you can use the stock heatsink if you are not planning on overclocking.

Regarding the broken pin; it all depends on which pin is broken. Some pins are reduntant pins and some are not.

This is a useful checklist for trouble-shooting: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-ste...



okay. well i cant seem to get it going. i mean it boots to window and loads then couple min later it just die. like not enough power or overheating. does the computer die if the cpu overheat? but i haven't tried removing the ram stick and leaving 1 so i have to do that in a bit.

and yes, i just figured it out. my cpu with 1 broken pin still work. THANK GOD! :bounce: 

and do you know why the cpu keep on sticking to the heatsink when im trying to remove the cpu that was purchase? is it the thermal compound i'm using?

thanks for the link also. perform most of it except removing the rams. :( 
August 13, 2011 11:09:36 PM

i seriously cannot figure it out. i might just give up. old cpu works perfectly. new cpu placed in with AS5 thermal compound applied, doesn't want to work. seem like it doesnt have enough power to start it up. it start then dies.

try booting with 1gb ram, and i get nothing. i've tried everything on the link. this is a working cpu.

amd athlon 64 x2 4200+ toledo CPU that will not boot.

:cry:  :cry:  :cry:  !!!


edit: http://forums.amd.com/forum/messageview.cfm?catid=22&th...

i'm guessing my mobo isnt gonna work. its been updated to latest.
August 14, 2011 1:21:27 AM

i figure it out. i was on vista and im not sure why it doesn't work on it. i guess i'll stay with xp for now till i can figure out the problem!

THANKS Ubrales for your time and help!!! :D 

:bounce:  :bounce:  :bounce: 
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August 14, 2011 1:29:56 AM

You have the right spirit for problem solving!

Sometimes these things drive one nuts! Another tactic that works is to walk away for a while and then get back on the task.

Here are the hardware requirements for Win Vista: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-vista/produc... (needs more than Win XP).
August 14, 2011 2:17:45 AM

Ubrales said:
You have the right spirit for problem solving!

Sometimes these things drive one nuts! Another tactic that works is to walk away for a while and then get back on the task.

Here are the hardware requirements for Win Vista: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-vista/produc... (needs more than Win XP).


yea, i notice.

i have 2 hdd, 1 vista and one xp. the bigger hdd i'm using right now is for vista and the smaller one is xp. im guessing i'm going to reformat my vista hdd and run xp for now and see how it goes for the next couple days. thanks for the help :D 
August 21, 2011 3:55:04 AM

still cannot get it working! UUUUUUURGGG :pfff:  :pfff:  :pfff: 

i just purchse 2 more 80mm fan so i can attach 1 more onto the new heatsink and 1 more to the case. it starts off cool around 34 celcius and heats up in the next 10 min to 110+ celcius!!! im thinking i just need more fans in the tower. hopefully this helps :cry: 
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August 21, 2011 3:14:01 PM

110+ degs C? This means that something other than fans is drastically wrong!

The first place to check would be the CPU/heatsink installation.
August 21, 2011 6:10:25 PM

Ubrales said:
110+ degs C? This means that something other than fans is drastically wrong!

The first place to check would be the CPU/heatsink installation.



yes, i'm thinking i didn't use enough AS5. i will try again tomorrow when i receive my other 2 fans i order from newegg. i took out the mobo so it'll be easier for me to apply the paste and put on the heatsink better. i'll keep you updated. :( 
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August 21, 2011 10:24:48 PM

n00btech said:
yes, i'm thinking i didn't use enough AS5. i will try again tomorrow when i receive my other 2 fans i order from newegg. i took out the mobo so it'll be easier for me to apply the paste and put on the heatsink better. i'll keep you updated. :( 

Please clean off all traces of thermal compound residue using alcohol swabs. Hold the CPU upside down when you do this so as not to get any alcohol inside the CPU during cleaning.

When you re-apply the Arctic Silver 5 and re-install the heatsink, please follow recommended industry procedures and practices. There are many on this site. If you need details, I shall be glad to post my detailed method of CPU/heatsink installation. This is an area where if you ask 3 people you will get 5 different opinions, and all of them are more or less correct.

Too much AS5 is bad; too little AS5 is bad. You should shoot for a thin even layer.
August 23, 2011 2:35:08 AM

Ubrales said:
Please clean off all traces of thermal compound residue using alcohol swabs. Hold the CPU upside down when you do this so as not to get any alcohol inside the CPU during cleaning.

When you re-apply the Arctic Silver 5 and re-install the heatsink, please follow recommended industry procedures and practices. There are many on this site. If you need details, I shall be glad to post my detailed method of CPU/heatsink installation. This is an area where if you ask 3 people you will get 5 different opinions, and all of them are more or less correct.

Too much AS5 is bad; too little AS5 is bad. You should shoot for a thin even layer.



well i just received 2 of my fans today and put 1 onto the heatsink. the heatsink i bought can hold 2 fans. my factory case was a little too small for the other one i guess. well, after applying a thin layer of AS5 onto the cpu and putting the heatsink on, i booted up the computer. after it idle for a good 10 min it was around the 60-63 Celsius. i read a couple forums and they said it was pretty much normal. after bout 30 min on searching the web, it went up to 90-95 celsius and it died. right when i was bout to get a screen shot of the temp on tempcore.

i also used speedfan to speed up my fans too 100%. im not sure if that was the right idea because it was set on 48% default.

please do post your method on putting the heatsink. this is really pissing me off. if i cant get it to work, im going to put back on my old cpu and call it quit, which i dont want to. im really enjoying how fast this cpu is! :fou:  :( 
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August 23, 2011 2:50:54 AM

Well.. this guide is for polishing heatsink bases.


Guide to Polishing Heatsink bases. By Ubrales (Uber Alles)

Polishing Heatsink bases is usually done by enthusiasts in order to improve heat transfer between the CPU and the heatsink. This, when done correctly results in lower CPU temps, thereby prolonging CPU life and also improving Overclocking capabilities.

Polishing is loosely referred to as "Lapping", but let it be known that whereas polishing can be done at home on a flat work surface, lapping can only be done utilizing highly accurate, expensive, and precise Lapping Machines costing tens of thousands of dollars.

Flatness and an improvement in micro finish is the objective, not necessarily a mirror finish. Frequently, after polishing, the improved flatness and the fine micro finish will make the surface look more or less like a mirror finish.

Tools requited are 1200 grit Silicon Carbide (wet or dry) paper, 2000 grit Silicon Carbide (wet or dry) paper (optional), elbow grease, and a few drops of water.

Here are the series of steps for polishing the base of a heatsink:

1. Find a flat surface to use as a base. A piece of 12" x 12" x 1/4" glass will work (glass top cocktail table, end table, breakfast table).

2. Lay a full sheet of 1200 grit Silicon Carbide paper flat on the glass surface and ensure that this sheet does not slip or slide during the polishing process. Put about 4 drops of water in the center of this sheet.

3. Place the heatsink base squarely over the center of the Silicon Carbide paper and gently start moving the heatsink base back and forth in about 2" strokes. The direction of the stroking must be towards you and away from you. Care must be taken not to tip the heatsink while you are doing this. Use a light downward force. Light force. Light force. Holding the heatsink closer to the base will help. Again, light downward force. (Practice doing this on a sheet of plain paper first if necessary - this will give you confidence).

4. Continue the stroking towards you and away from you, staying on the same central area of the Silicon Carbide sheet. Move your body (not the work piece) about 30 degrees and continue the stroking. Like dancing around a May pole. This will change the polishing direction on the heatsink base. Repeat for about 10 minutes.

5. By now, you will notice that the polishing residue on the Silicon Carbide paper is reddish - this is the color of the copper base under the Nickel plating film that is now polished away. Using the edge of a razor blade is an approximation of a straight edge. It is not a straight edge, but will give you ball park information that is close enough.

6. Continue for 10 more minutes on the same sheet of Silicon Carbide paper, and you are done. VIOLA!

7. Continuing Polishing with the 2000 grit paper is purely optional. Like icing (frosting) on the cake.


A note about the CPU: Leave the CPU alone. The heat spreader of the CPU is a sheet metal component made by the draw (see "deep drawing”) process. The thermal expansion characteristics of thin sheet metal drawn parts are hard to determine. I am reasonably sure (oxymoron?) that there will be some improvement in heat transfer if the high spots at the corners of the CPU are polished away, but the marginal gains may not be worth the efforts. Therefore, I am not recommending any polishing of the CPU. Another point to note would be that any alteration will void the warranty.
August 23, 2011 3:35:57 AM

Ubrales said:
Well.. this guide is for polishing heatsink bases.


Guide to Polishing Heatsink bases. By Ubrales (Uber Alles)

Polishing Heatsink bases is usually done by enthusiasts in order to improve heat transfer between the CPU and the heatsink. This, when done correctly results in lower CPU temps, thereby prolonging CPU life and also improving Overclocking capabilities.

Polishing is loosely referred to as "Lapping", but let it be known that whereas polishing can be done at home on a flat work surface, lapping can only be done utilizing highly accurate, expensive, and precise Lapping Machines costing tens of thousands of dollars.

Flatness and an improvement in micro finish is the objective, not necessarily a mirror finish. Frequently, after polishing, the improved flatness and the fine micro finish will make the surface look more or less like a mirror finish.

Tools requited are 1200 grit Silicon Carbide (wet or dry) paper, 2000 grit Silicon Carbide (wet or dry) paper (optional), elbow grease, and a few drops of water.

Here are the series of steps for polishing the base of a heatsink:

1. Find a flat surface to use as a base. A piece of 12" x 12" x 1/4" glass will work (glass top cocktail table, end table, breakfast table).

2. Lay a full sheet of 1200 grit Silicon Carbide paper flat on the glass surface and ensure that this sheet does not slip or slide during the polishing process. Put about 4 drops of water in the center of this sheet.

3. Place the heatsink base squarely over the center of the Silicon Carbide paper and gently start moving the heatsink base back and forth in about 2" strokes. The direction of the stroking must be towards you and away from you. Care must be taken not to tip the heatsink while you are doing this. Use a light downward force. Light force. Light force. Holding the heatsink closer to the base will help. Again, light downward force. (Practice doing this on a sheet of plain paper first if necessary - this will give you confidence).

4. Continue the stroking towards you and away from you, staying on the same central area of the Silicon Carbide sheet. Move your body (not the work piece) about 30 degrees and continue the stroking. Like dancing around a May pole. This will change the polishing direction on the heatsink base. Repeat for about 10 minutes.

5. By now, you will notice that the polishing residue on the Silicon Carbide paper is reddish - this is the color of the copper base under the Nickel plating film that is now polished away. Using the edge of a razor blade is an approximation of a straight edge. It is not a straight edge, but will give you ball park information that is close enough.

6. Continue for 10 more minutes on the same sheet of Silicon Carbide paper, and you are done. VIOLA!

7. Continuing Polishing with the 2000 grit paper is purely optional. Like icing (frosting) on the cake.


A note about the CPU: Leave the CPU alone. The heat spreader of the CPU is a sheet metal component made by the draw (see "deep drawing”) process. The thermal expansion characteristics of thin sheet metal drawn parts are hard to determine. I am reasonably sure (oxymoron?) that there will be some improvement in heat transfer if the high spots at the corners of the CPU are polished away, but the marginal gains may not be worth the efforts. Therefore, I am not recommending any polishing of the CPU. Another point to note would be that any alteration will void the warranty.



is this a guarantee to work? if so im going to the store tomorrow to purchase some grit paper.

can you tell me if speedfan can cause it to heat up so fast?
and how do i know if it's not my cpu that is causing the overheat?
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August 23, 2011 6:52:43 AM

n00btech said:
is this a guarantee to work? if so im going to the store tomorrow to purchase some grit paper.

can you tell me if speedfan can cause it to heat up so fast?
and how do i know if it's not my cpu that is causing the overheat?

Polishing the base of the heatsink will reduce temps from 5 to 8 degrees C.

If the speed of the fans is too low, it will aggravate the heat situation.

Yes, it is the CPU that produces all the heat. And the purpose of heatsinks is to dissipate this heat.
August 23, 2011 7:35:33 AM

Place your finger on the processor for 2 seconds. You should find the processor heating up. Then turn it off immediately. If this works then your processor is good.
Remember not to leave it ON for more than 5 secs.

funny photos
August 23, 2011 7:36:22 AM

Ubrales said:
Polishing the base of the heatsink will reduce temps from 5 to 8 degrees C.

If the speed of the fans is too low, it will aggravate the heat situation.

Yes, it is the CPU that produces all the heat. And the purpose of heatsinks is to dissipate this heat.



okay. well i might need more then 5-8 degrees drop. it keeps on rising up till 100 C then shuts off completely.

i bought 2 of these fans.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

i might just go buy myself a new heatsink. any recommendations? i was thinking bout zalman 9700. i'm not sure if its the hyper 101 that is not working.

and is there anything that i can attached onto my factory case to add more fans? my case temp was 67 C
August 23, 2011 7:39:58 AM

trishapatel said:
Place your finger on the processor for 2 seconds. You should find the processor heating up. Then turn it off immediately. If this works then your processor is good.
Remember not to leave it ON for more than 5 secs.

funny photos



i believe my cpu is working. because every time i clean the AS5 out and apply a new layer, my computer runs for a good 15 min then the temp climbs in a pretty fast pace, from 35 to 100 degree C. so it's either my heatsink that i just bought is too cheap and no good or the thermal paste that im applying it wrong. im not even applying that much, just a thin layer just like everyone suggested.
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August 23, 2011 2:54:23 PM

n00btech said:
i believe my cpu is working. because every time i clean the AS5 out and apply a new layer, my computer runs for a good 15 min then the temp climbs in a pretty fast pace, from 35 to 100 degree C. so it's either my heatsink that i just bought is too cheap and no good or the thermal paste that im applying it wrong. im not even applying that much, just a thin layer just like everyone suggested.

High temps is definitely a sign of improper CPU/heatsink installation! Either the heatsink is inadequate for the application, or, the installation is faulty! Check the temps inside the case too even though I don't think that this is the major contributor to the problem.
August 23, 2011 3:39:16 PM

Ubrales said:
High temps is definitely a sign of improper CPU/heatsink installation! Either the heatsink is inadequate for the application, or, the installation is faulty! Check the temps inside the case too even though I don't think that this is the major contributor to the problem.



im thinking its the heatsink now.

what is the best heatsink do you suggest for a 939 mobo? a good price range also.

your thoughts on the zalman 9700?
August 23, 2011 4:07:37 PM

So have you used the stock heatsink and already purchased an additional one and its still not working? Do not buy another one. Even with not so great stock heatsinks the cpu should not be overheating to the point where it will shut down after 15min of web browsing.

Are you positive that you are fully applying the cooler? If it's a pin configuration, it is best to instal it while your motherboard is out of the case. Be sure that all the pins are in all the way.

And you say that you've been applying a thin layer of thermal paste. This is correct. You want a thin and almost see-through layer between the surfaces of the heatsink and the cpu.
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August 23, 2011 4:13:13 PM

n00btech said:
im thinking its the heatsink now.

what is the best heatsink do you suggest for a 939 mobo? a good price range also.

your thoughts on the zalman 9700?

Looks good! Here are the specs: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

One last thing before you buy the new heatsink; check the operation of the fan in the heatsink. Make sure that the settings in the BIOS for auto control of this fan is not too low.
August 24, 2011 6:10:26 PM

trogdor796 said:
So have you used the stock heatsink and already purchased an additional one and its still not working? Do not buy another one. Even with not so great stock heatsinks the cpu should not be overheating to the point where it will shut down after 15min of web browsing.

Are you positive that you are fully applying the cooler? If it's a pin configuration, it is best to instal it while your motherboard is out of the case. Be sure that all the pins are in all the way.

And you say that you've been applying a thin layer of thermal paste. This is correct. You want a thin and almost see-through layer between the surfaces of the heatsink and the cpu.



yes, i've tried the stock and the new heatsink and still no help.

im pretty positive but not sure. i will try another attempt today. i took out the motherboard out and installed the heatsink before putting it back in the case.

i placed my old cpu back on and it's working fine. i just want to know if it's a faulty cpu. like overheating problems. this is my first time switching out to a new cpu. old cpu idles 28 C degrees with the new heatsink.

so can a faulty cpu cause it to overheat? is there a way i can check if cpu is causing it to overheat?
August 24, 2011 6:26:54 PM

Ubrales said:
Looks good! Here are the specs: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

One last thing before you buy the new heatsink; check the operation of the fan in the heatsink. Make sure that the settings in the BIOS for auto control of this fan is not too low.



i cant really do much with this factory bio. but the cpu fan average out speed at 1050 and the system fan is 1500.

im not sure about buying a new heatsink just yet. im not even sure if it's the heat sink or the cpu itself that is causing it to overheat. i've search all over the web and still cant find a way to check if the cpu is causing it to overheat. if i can't figure out the problem, i'm gonna stick with the old cpu and remove all the item that was purchase and save it for later.

Best solution

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August 24, 2011 8:46:11 PM
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1050 RPM seems very low for a CPU fan. 2500 to 3500 RPM would be a suitable range. And is you cannot change it in the BIOS, you are stuck!
August 24, 2011 9:29:13 PM

Ubrales said:
1050 RPM seems very low for a CPU fan. 2500 to 3500 RPM would be a suitable range. And is you cannot change it in the BIOS, you are stuck!


theres no other way? like without doing it from bios? cause i read a lot of forums that said factory bios cannot be unlock for anything.
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August 24, 2011 9:40:53 PM

n00btech said:
theres no other way? like without doing it from bios? cause i read a lot of forums that said factory bios cannot be unlock for anything.

There may be a workaround. I would try leaving the CPU fan as-is, and add a high capacity fan to blow tons of air onto the heatsink by attaching it to the side of the heatsink. But this is all custom engineering, and it might be worthwhile to try it just for the experience and the satisfaction of solving a stubborn problem.

The real problem is that the high temps are always caused by a lack of heat transfer from the CPU.
August 25, 2011 1:33:19 AM

Ubrales said:
There may be a workaround. I would try leaving the CPU fan as-is, and add a high capacity fan to blow tons of air onto the heatsink by attaching it to the side of the heatsink. But this is all custom engineering, and it might be worthwhile to try it just for the experience and the satisfaction of solving a stubborn problem.

The real problem is that the high temps are always caused by a lack of heat transfer from the CPU.



okay. well i guess i got my answer. thanks for your patient and help! really appreciate it. i guess i'll just do a budget build or buy a combo deal from newegg later on this year. THANKS!
August 25, 2011 1:33:51 AM

Best answer selected by n00btech.
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2011 1:37:35 AM

Thank you!
August 26, 2011 9:12:00 AM

Ubrales said:
Thank you!




hello Ubrales. i'm back. we'll figured out how to set my cpu fan and system fan to be a little faster. i did a little more researching on A8N-LA motherboards and found how to get into the bios advance settings. all i had to do was press F11 on boot up and it'll go into advance mode. well those forums recommend to disable both system and cpu fan factory settings. then i turned it up 9.5V for the fans. at this moment, cpu fan is running average of 1700 RPM and system fan is 2250 RPM. is that normal or should it be higher? just want to make sure before re-installing the AMD ATHLON 64 x2 4200+ toledo back in and give it another shot. :D 
a b à CPUs
August 26, 2011 1:28:54 PM

n00btech said:
hello Ubrales. i'm back. we'll figured out how to set my cpu fan and system fan to be a little faster. i did a little more researching on A8N-LA motherboards and found how to get into the bios advance settings. all i had to do was press F11 on boot up and it'll go into advance mode. well those forums recommend to disable both system and cpu fan factory settings. then i turned it up 9.5V for the fans. at this moment, cpu fan is running average of 1700 RPM and system fan is 2250 RPM. is that normal or should it be higher? just want to make sure before re-installing the AMD ATHLON 64 x2 4200+ toledo back in and give it another shot. :D 

1700 RPM is an idling speed for the CPU fan. 2250 RPM for the System fan seems ok if the temps are withing acceptable ranges.
August 26, 2011 4:18:50 PM

Ubrales said:
1700 RPM is an idling speed for the CPU fan. 2250 RPM for the System fan seems ok if the temps are withing acceptable ranges.



the temperature for the the old cpu stays below 55 C. well im gonna try and put on the new cpu today and see how it goes.
a b à CPUs
August 26, 2011 5:38:50 PM

n00btech said:
the temperature for the the old cpu stays below 55 C. well im gonna try and put on the new cpu today and see how it goes.

If this thread is closed start a new thread. I am very much interested in working with you to get this problem completely resolved.
August 26, 2011 7:31:20 PM

Ubrales said:
If this thread is closed start a new thread. I am very much interested in working with you to get this problem completely resolved.



screw it. im done. im giving up and returning the cpu back. i let the computer sit in bios for 1 hour and it was fine at 52 C; every time i restart it too it'll idle at 52 C. then i booted it up to windows and it suddenly died. restart back to bios, and the temp was 115 C!!! :fou:  :fou:  :fou:  i am done.
!