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Is 8GB's of RAM good enough for now, or should I go 16GB's?

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April 26, 2012 9:12:56 PM

Hi, I'm planning to build a new computer sometime this year, or at least buy newer parts for my current build, but Newegg is having a sale on RAM today, and I'm just wondering if I should go 8GB's, or 16GB's. I don't know if I want to spend the money, right now, if 16GB's won't make much of a difference, but it is always nice to futureproof. And if I do go with 8GB's, will I be able to purchase any 1600MHz RAM Sticks in the future to upgrade in case the specific RAM I order today goes OOS or Unproduced by that time? IIRC, you can use any brand as long as it's the same speed, and timing, though I'm not sure about voltage.

Oh, and is there any better deals than this currently?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I've heard that you don't need more than 1333/1600 max, where computers are currently at, as you won't see a difference, so 1600MHz seems like a good choice. But is that actually a good deal, or have there been much better deals?

With tax the price of 16GB's comes to $96.50, and of course 8GB's would come out to half of that, $48.25.

Anyway, is it worth it to get that now for $96.50, or should I hold out for a better deal, or just get 8GB's, or is there a better deal currently going on? From what I've searched I haven't seen any. I'm not really in a huge hurry to buy it, as I don't need it any time soon, just figured I could buy it while it's on sale and save some money.

Thanks for any help!

More about : 8gb ram good 16gb

a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 1:34:10 AM

meatymcloven said:
Anyway, is it worth it to get that now for $96.50, or should I hold out for a better deal, or just get 8GB's, or is there a better deal currently going on?

DDR3 prices are already ridiculously low, I have a hard time imagining them going any lower when many DRAM manufacturers are either barely breaking even or recording losses. They must be praying for something to help bump prices back up.

At the record low price of under $120 for 16GB, I personally would not have any hesitation aiming for 16GB on a new build for myself. In the first PC I built myself, I paid $100 per 1MB SIMM so $120 for 16GB looks dirt-cheap to me at ~16000X cheaper.
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a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 1:52:03 AM

Do you edit video?

More than 8GB of RAM serves no purpose other than to add heat to your computer unless you have a specific use like editing video.

Windows 7 RAM usage:

1GB - multitasking is sluggish
2GB - multitasking is far more responsive
3GB - generally sufficient
4GB - little benefit over 3GB, but recommended for gamers
8GB - no advantage during games but opening/closing games may be faster in some scenarios

16GB - must edit video or do some other task that can actually utilize this much RAM or it will add HEAT to your case

*It's interesting to note that the new NVidia GTX680 adds a feature called GPU Boost that can increase frame rates if the thermal limit is not hit. It's very useful and NVidia said all future NVidia graphics products will use this.

My point about GPU Boost is that if you add more RAM to the case, you raise the heat which will then actually reduce the effectiveness of the graphics card. It will be slight in a properly cooled case but it will exist and why PAY MONEY for a feature that serves ONLY to reduce your gaming experience.

**MORE IS NOT ALWAYS BETTER** (just ask my wife)
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a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 2:50:36 AM

photonboy said:
16GB - must edit video or do some other task that can actually utilize this much RAM or it will add HEAT to your case

16 chips 8GB DIMMs use only ~2W more than 16 chips 4GB DIMMs, 4W for a pair does not make much of a difference.

As for 4GB having "little benefit", try panning around in Cataclysm while flying over the middle of Stormwind. Pretty jerky with 4GB because there isn't enough RAM to keep everything in RAM.

I don't do video editing but I do use many memory-hungry programs and some VMs. The convenience of being able to load applications, VMs, etc. and not have to close/restart them all the time to free up RAM for something else is addictive.
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a c 146 } Memory
April 27, 2012 2:59:30 AM

meatymcloven said:
Hi, I'm planning to build a new computer sometime this year, or at least buy newer parts for my current build, but Newegg is having a sale on RAM today, and I'm just wondering if I should go 8GB's, or 16GB's. I don't know if I want to spend the money, right now, if 16GB's won't make much of a difference, but it is always nice to futureproof. And if I do go with 8GB's, will I be able to purchase any 1600MHz RAM Sticks in the future to upgrade in case the specific RAM I order today goes OOS or Unproduced by that time? IIRC, you can use any brand as long as it's the same speed, and timing, though I'm not sure about voltage.

Oh, and is there any better deals than this currently?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I've heard that you don't need more than 1333/1600 max, where computers are currently at, as you won't see a difference, so 1600MHz seems like a good choice. But is that actually a good deal, or have there been much better deals?

With tax the price of 16GB's comes to $96.50, and of course 8GB's would come out to half of that, $48.25.

Anyway, is it worth it to get that now for $96.50, or should I hold out for a better deal, or just get 8GB's, or is there a better deal currently going on? From what I've searched I haven't seen any. I'm not really in a huge hurry to buy it, as I don't need it any time soon, just figured I could buy it while it's on sale and save some money.

Thanks for any help!

Just get 16GB, u will benefit from that. Its so cheap and it is helpful at all times. And get a kit of 16GB.

Unless u are a poor student :D  and right now it is too much to spend, than 8GB is just fine.

We are talking about $50 here.
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a c 146 } Memory
April 27, 2012 3:02:09 AM

InvalidError said:
16 chips 8GB DIMMs use only ~2W more than 16 chips 4GB DIMMs, 4W for a pair does not make much of a difference.

As for 4GB having "little benefit", try panning around in Cataclysm while flying over the middle of Stormwind. Pretty jerky with 4GB because there isn't enough RAM to keep everything in RAM.

I don't do video editing but I do use many memory-hungry programs and some VMs. The convenience of being able to load applications, VMs, etc. and not have to close/restart them all the time to free up RAM for something else is addictive.

Yeah, u would benefit for sure. U could create the RAM disc and run VM there : ))
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a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 3:28:57 AM

InvalidError said:
16 chips 8GB DIMMs use only ~2W more than 16 chips 4GB DIMMs, 4W for a pair does not make much of a difference.

As for 4GB having "little benefit", try panning around in Cataclysm while flying over the middle of Stormwind. Pretty jerky with 4GB because there isn't enough RAM to keep everything in RAM.

I don't do video editing but I do use many memory-hungry programs and some VMs. The convenience of being able to load applications, VMs, etc. and not have to close/restart them all the time to free up RAM for something else is addictive.


Let me respond:
RAM heat - I said the heat difference was minor.

4GB - I said "recommended for gamers."; by "little benefit" I am referring to non-gaming usage.

VM - (Virtual Machine, i.e. an Operating System image) is a pretty rare scenario.

*There is simply no point in getting 16GB of RAM for most people. Windows 7 won't attempt to use beyond a certain amount. Why not just get 128GB of RAM then?

To be clear, by "editing video" I don't mean transcoding or converting video. That is processing limited and the RAM amount doesn't matter.

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a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 3:38:35 AM

I should add...

EXTENSIVE testing has been done a while back. I no longer have the link but I read it all. It compared 2GB, 4GB, 8GB and 16GB scenarios.

*Basically 16GB provided NO benefit except:
- video editing
- Virtual Machines
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a c 146 } Memory
April 27, 2012 4:07:01 AM

photonboy said:
I should add...

EXTENSIVE testing has been done a while back. I no longer have the link but I read it all. It compared 2GB, 4GB, 8GB and 16GB scenarios.

*Basically 16GB provided NO benefit except:
- video editing
- Virtual Machines


To start with few benefits of more RAM...

By storing files and programs into memory, you can speed up internet load times and disk-to-disk activities, accelerate databases and reduce compile times. Save and load features allow RAMDisk to appear as persistent storage, even through reboots.

U can run Virtual machine .....

Temp files ...

RAR file extraction

Scratch disks used in graphic design programs, such as Adobe Photoshop

Most users use RAMDisk to speed up applications like:

Databases
Internet Explorer cache for faster web surfing
Audio and Video editing
CAD programs
Software compilers
Speeding up CD duplication
Games
SETI processing
TEMP files
Swap space
Web server cache
Custom applications with high I/O, high bandwidth, or high security requirements

The security of the RAMDisk because if you do not choose to back up the RAMDisk, all information will be wiped upon power loss or shutdown.

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a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 4:12:14 AM

photonboy said:
EXTENSIVE testing has been done a while back. I no longer have the link but I read it all. It compared 2GB, 4GB, 8GB and 16GB scenarios.

All such comparisons I remember ever seeing were under single-tasking gaming scenarios where there are no significant other programs loaded during testing. Having more RAM has the biggest pay-off when you start loading multiple programs which rarely happens in gaming benchmarks where testers usually want to minimize variables and achieve the highest possible results.
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a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 7:06:40 AM

InvalidError said:
All such comparisons I remember ever seeing were under single-tasking gaming scenarios where there are no significant other programs loaded during testing. Having more RAM has the biggest pay-off when you start loading multiple programs which rarely happens in gaming benchmarks where testers usually want to minimize variables and achieve the highest possible results.


NO.
They did extensive multi-tasking.

I personally have 8GB of RAM and monitor it frequently. Even after Windows 7 64bit tries to buffer everything I'm doing I never go above 4GB except during a game.

Very few games need more than 2GB of RAM and when you are done the game it is immediately deleted from RAM.

A typical scenario is this:
1) boot computer, Windows buffers about 2GB of RAM
2) use for a while, heavy Internet, other applications, Windows buffers about 3 to 4GB
3) start a game, Windows jumps from 4GB to 6GB
4) stop the game, Windows jumps from 6GB down to 4GB

Keep in mind that Windows can remove most things from RAM. It just doesn't generally with 8GB because you have plenty of RAM. So if I only had 4GB and needed 2GB for a game, there would be a slight slowdown starting the game (not much) as Windows removed a few things.

People seem to get quite upset when I say 8GB is plenty and I'll say it again, 16GB even for gamers is pointless. Windows simply can't find enough things to fill up the space unless you have non-typical scenarios that make use of it.

I know very few people that use VM's or assign RAM cache's. (RAM cache's are generally pointless anyway. Look at your memory allocations and you'll see that your browser is using your RAM already, not the hard drive to buffer what it's doing. I loaded up a massive, massive amount of web pages and couldn't get above 1000MB of space.)

*I'd like to see somebody use more than 8GB without a VM, RAM cache or other non-typical scenario.
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April 27, 2012 7:17:03 AM

When I play Battlefield Bad company 2 I use about 5-6 gb of ram, and use about 2 gb when on desktop browsing the interwebs.
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a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 12:47:48 PM

photonboy said:
So if I only had 4GB and needed 2GB for a game, there would be a slight slowdown starting the game (not much) as Windows removed a few things.

That may be tolerable if you only run and use one program at a time. If you use multiple programs at a time, you then end up having to wait for (un)swapping every time you tab to something else or having constant swap grinding if background processes are active.

photonboy said:
People seem to get quite upset when I say 8GB is plenty and I'll say it again, 16GB even for gamers is pointless.

I'm not a gamer, I'm a multi-tasker who enjoys (read: addicted to) the convenience of always having my most frequently used programs always loaded without having to wait an eternity for program startup or stuff to get pulled out of the swapfile every time I want to switch to something else for a few seconds/minutes. That has been my computer usage philosophy for the past 15+ years and my computers have had 2-4X the "normal" amount of RAM because of it. Now that I am starting to bump against the 8GB wall (usually got ~7GB in-use), I have to start closing/restarting programs when I want to do something else that isn't already loaded and that just isn't how I like using my computers.

With DDR3 memory as cheap as it is today, more people can enjoy even greater convenience I have for a fraction of the cost and I think they should grant themselves that possibility if their wallets easily allows the ~$50 extra expense.
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a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 1:01:22 PM

InvalidError,
I've never heard of a single person using the amount of RAM you describe in normal usage.

Unless you are using VM's or a RAM cache it seem very odd to me to hit 7GB+.

Nor should you have to manually close some programs to clear up space to open others. The Windows memory manager does that for you. It automatically removes the least-used programs to clear up space.

All my programs open up in under one second, such as Microsoft Word once they've been opened the first time and buffered to RAM.

Also, if you have an SSD even programs that aren't previously buffered to RAM don't take long to open. The exception is video games but they don't remain in RAM anyway so are moot to the conversation here.

*I'd be interested to know what you are doing that actually uses that much RAM.
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a c 146 } Memory
April 27, 2012 1:16:24 PM

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a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 2:17:45 PM

photonboy said:
Unless you are using VM's or a RAM cache it seem very odd to me to hit 7GB+.

Try loading a couple of software/hardware development environments and load some projects, you get to 4-5GB pretty quickly, more after adding all other support tools such as office suite, browsers, mail client and PDF for documentation. Add a game on the side to kill time during builds and you're at 8+GB.

photonboy said:
Nor should you have to manually close some programs to clear up space to open others. The Windows memory manager does that for you. It automatically removes the least-used programs to clear up space.

Windows does not magically remove programs, it dumps unused/least-recently-used code/data in the swapfile which takes a while if it is doing it to free up space for a program you are starting to load and Windows has to swap it back if code/data that gets swapped out in that process becomes active again either by itself or because you tabbed back to that program which can cause delays of several seconds if large amounts of code/data are being swapped in/out. Many programs also have a significant amount of data that is either marked as non-pageable or is active regularly enough to prevent swap-out such as all the code and data that gets used to repaint the windows.

Having to wait longer for swapping than the time it takes to read what I need out of a PDF is not something I have patience for.
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a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 2:43:04 PM

"Try loading a couple of software/hardware development environments and load some projects"

As I said above somewhere, this is non-typical usage.
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a b } Memory
April 27, 2012 2:57:45 PM



Uh, you appear to have at least 40 Chrome tabs open with many containing huge amounts of pictures.

FYI, I noticed Chrome will even buffer pages that I am no longer viewing so if you don't close it the RAM usage spirals out of control. I've never gone above 1GB with 8 tabs open.
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a c 146 } Memory
April 27, 2012 3:03:45 PM

photonboy said:
Uh, you appear to have at least 40 Chrome tabs open with many containing huge amounts of pictures.

FYI, I noticed Chrome will even buffer pages that I am no longer viewing so if you don't close it the RAM usage spirals out of control. I've never gone above 1GB with 8 tabs open.

Actually I don't have any web with pics opened, but I found out the cause just about a week ago.

I have about 16550+ bookmarks.

That is it : )

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a c 146 } Memory
April 27, 2012 3:04:22 PM

And I have now opened 137 tabs in 3 instances.
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a c 146 } Memory
April 27, 2012 3:15:24 PM

That is why I am running an bookmark app editor. AM Deadlink 4.4 is a free app.

Now after deleting dupes and links that does not exist anymore, it went down to 12K.

And other links deleted after comparison, I am down to 5053 favorites : )

And the Chrome is faster now. Not that it was slow, but it is a little faster.

I can tell the difference, since I have opened more than a dozen instances with 350+ tabs.
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a b } Memory
December 24, 2012 9:57:57 AM

The more ram you have the more memory the components of your computer has to do things with. End of, dont worry about what everyone is saying here, you will always benefit from more ram go for the 16GB crucial ram do these at really good prices and enjoy it! no computer lasts forever so dont worry about over heating issues and what not :)  have fun!
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a b } Memory
December 25, 2012 2:45:13 AM

Quote:
The more ram you have the more memory the components of your computer has to do things with. End of, dont worry about what everyone is saying here, you will always benefit from more ram go for the 16GB crucial ram do these at really good prices and enjoy it! no computer lasts forever so dont worry about over heating issues and what not :)  have fun!


Check the DATE of this post.
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March 9, 2014 1:56:39 PM

photonboy said:
Quote:
The more ram you have the more memory the components of your computer has to do things with. End of, dont worry about what everyone is saying here, you will always benefit from more ram go for the 16GB crucial ram do these at really good prices and enjoy it! no computer lasts forever so dont worry about over heating issues and what not :)  have fun!


Check the DATE of this post.

Christmas Eve 2012..... I don't see what you mean.
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April 7, 2014 5:58:45 PM

photonboy said:
Do you edit video?

More than 8GB of RAM serves no purpose other than to add heat to your computer unless you have a specific use like editing video.

Windows 7 RAM usage:

1GB - multitasking is sluggish
2GB - multitasking is far more responsive
3GB - generally sufficient
4GB - little benefit over 3GB, but recommended for gamers
8GB - no advantage during games but opening/closing games may be faster in some scenarios

16GB - must edit video or do some other task that can actually utilize this much RAM or it will add HEAT to your case

*It's interesting to note that the new NVidia GTX680 adds a feature called GPU Boost that can increase frame rates if the thermal limit is not hit. It's very useful and NVidia said all future NVidia graphics products will use this.

My point about GPU Boost is that if you add more RAM to the case, you raise the heat which will then actually reduce the effectiveness of the graphics card. It will be slight in a properly cooled case but it will exist and why PAY MONEY for a feature that serves ONLY to reduce your gaming experience.

**MORE IS NOT ALWAYS BETTER** (just ask my wife)


Older thread but 16GB DOES in fact help.. 3 words: LARGE DISK CACHE

After superfetch is done loading things up, your programs will load a LOT faster, after you have played a game for about 30mins, the ENTIRE game will be cached to ram, and load times will be virtually instant.. I have had 16GB of ram for ages.. and yes it DOES help

Windows 8.1 after it sits idle takes up about 4gb of ram.. that leaves only 4 on an 8GB system... it can page all but 1.5GB of that to disk... which still leaves plenty of ram... but paging takes time.

Even 2 yrs ago 16 would benefit over 8 for 3 words: LARGE DISK CACHE After your computer has been running for a few days, all your games and programs will instantly open because all the data is being read from cache at the ns vs ms level... so yes.. 16 has a HUGE benefit over 8... plus if it's 16 in a HIGH END machine.. that machine will be good for gaming.. or for anything for about SEVEN years.. providing it doesn't have major failures and providing the user keeps the GPU updated.

I'm on an Alienware Aurora R3 from 2012 with 16GB.. It does have Usb 3 but only PCI 2... but I have that nice intel 4 CORE HT cpu that I can clock at 5ghz water cooled... not many current machines can pull that off... the only thing I'm missing is PCI 3

My bios didn't support drives over 2TB nor did it support IEFI... so I grabbed the raid and disk portion of the bios from a current r4 and inserted it into my bios.. now my system can boot from drives up to 4TB and use drives larger than 4TB as non system drives

But back to the original point... I can't see any argument for NOT putting in 16GB back in 2012 and in 2014. I could easily say 32GB is useless.. but it's not:LARGE HARD DRIVE cache... SSDs are nice.. but be real.. they just book the OS and maybe some games... most systems just use SSDs to boot and a raid 0 or 5 for data. but hey.. system ram is still faster than a SSD... so you still benefit from a large file cache...

You really can't have to much.. if I could put 128GB in my box, I'd do it.. heat from ram sticks is minimal.. and with modern cooling, it's a non issue.. with 128GB of RAM... every part of windows would be cached, and every game and program you ran would be cached and run with the speed as if it were on a ram drive.

So 16,32, etc no benefit? wrong.. MAJOR benefit to the speed of launching and running of apps.
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July 1, 2014 5:48:53 AM

Hi David Dutton. Recently I installed 16GB of RAM in my PC with Windows 8.1, which mainly use graphic design programs, google chrome and occasionally some 3D. The performance monitor shows me that I'm only using about 4 or 5GB of RAM. What do you think, should I configure something to make more efficient use of my memory? Thanks for your advice
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July 17, 2014 12:58:59 PM

photonboy said:
Do you edit video?

More than 8GB of RAM serves no purpose other than to add heat to your computer unless you have a specific use like editing video.

Windows 7 RAM usage:

1GB - multitasking is sluggish
2GB - multitasking is far more responsive
3GB - generally sufficient
4GB - little benefit over 3GB, but recommended for gamers
8GB - no advantage during games but opening/closing games may be faster in some scenarios

16GB - must edit video or do some other task that can actually utilize this much RAM or it will add HEAT to your case

*It's interesting to note that the new NVidia GTX680 adds a feature called GPU Boost that can increase frame rates if the thermal limit is not hit. It's very useful and NVidia said all future NVidia graphics products will use this.

My point about GPU Boost is that if you add more RAM to the case, you raise the heat which will then actually reduce the effectiveness of the graphics card. It will be slight in a properly cooled case but it will exist and why PAY MONEY for a feature that serves ONLY to reduce your gaming experience.

**MORE IS NOT ALWAYS BETTER** (just ask my wife)


Cisco recommends 64 GB for a VM workstation running more than 8 VMs (Windows 8).
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July 29, 2014 8:59:12 AM

I am surprised when people keeping saying that only gamers need more than 4 GB.

I usually do a lot of research on the internet, may be I am an information hungry guy, and I can easily end up opening 40+ tabs minimum on a normal day. Then add a few open PDF documents I am reading, a couple of Word docs open as I compose a book and there you have it! It starts feeling sluggish at 4 GB

And when I open 10 youtube educational videos (at least) and start watching them and downloading them, the computer sputters and stutters.

And then there is bittorrent running in the background downloading some educational open source videos.

And then lets assume you have two microsoft user accounts open simultaneously.

The computer now starts sputtering at 6 GB. Windows PhotoViewer takes 120 seconds to load an image of F-22 Raptor.

And I am not playing any games... I never play games....Even when I do,rarely, they are primarily strategy games with low memory footprint.

Solution: ReadyBoost through Pendrive. I allocated 8 GB for ReadyBoost and now the computer is blazing fast....

So if you are doing some CAD or MAYA or playing CRYSIS or such multiplayer action games...go for 16 GB RAM.

Or if you are computer is sluggish because of too many browser tabs and open docs, and 20 youtube videos playing/downloading simultaenously, use ReadyBoost.
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July 29, 2014 9:07:34 AM

And I might also be transcoding and burning a few DVDs out of the educational videos, Kaspersky Anti-Virus may kick in, three or four softwares are pestering you for updates and they trick you to click yes and start downloading 0.5-1GB of updates, and Java decides to install itself after downloading the latest version( I dont remember it giving permission to do so) and it all adds up.

I wonder what kind of person goes with just 4 GB. I guess he just checks email and logs out and does not have more than 5 tabs open.

And I might be posting to a couple of open forums just as I am doing now, sharing the fruits of my research.....and I am listening to music and may be ripping music from my DVD to external drive and then well running anti-virus on my 1 TB drives....the more memory I have the more tasks I can come up with.....but ReadyBoost is enough for me.....I just need to allocate more of it.
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July 29, 2014 9:12:54 AM

And my laptop is switched on for may be a week or two and I need all my programs and docs and files and browser tabs open and readily available. I might need a tab I opened a week ago and I want it when I want it with no more than a couple of seconds delay. If you are like me, then minimum you need 6 GB.
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July 29, 2014 9:15:44 AM

By the way even I am planning to upgrade RAM to speed up certain things.... I wonder whether transition from 6 B to 8 GB will overheat my laptop and cause problems. I own a Dell Inspiron Core i3 dual core, N5051. Again there is already a 4 GB card in one slot and with the difficulty of getting 2 GB cards, I may end up having 10 GB or even 12 GB. Is it safe for my laptop to have 8 GB plus memory? Will I lose some components due to excess heat?
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a c 90 } Memory
July 29, 2014 9:20:28 AM

You do realize that you are making comments on RAM usage from a 2 year old conversation, right?
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July 29, 2014 7:26:54 PM

Maybe, 16GB does more benefit than 8GB.
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a c 90 } Memory
July 29, 2014 7:34:06 PM

Joanle said:
Maybe, 16GB does more benefit than 8GB.


Today, maybe. 2 years ago when the question was asked? Maybe not so much.
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July 30, 2014 5:59:02 AM

USAFRet said:
You do realize that you are making comments on RAM usage from a 2 year old conversation, right?


Yes. I kind of was aware of the fact, but I thought I would share my experience and gave some general advice. Plus I had a question of my own. What do you think, would upgrading my laptop of said configuration from 6 GB to 10-12 GB increase the heat generated and create heat related issues?
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August 3, 2014 8:04:39 AM

I'm a computer systems engineering student,,,,im still in my first year, and i thought of upgrading my laptop memory to 8GB from 4GB..

Is it worth to upgrade???

I do a lot of research and sometimes open 15+ tabs in my browser,I also use auto-cad... and i will use some more advance software in the future.. and sometimes my memory usage goes up to 70%>>
I also do some advanced gaming like arma3, black flag..etc rarely..

current laptop specs..(ASUS X550CC)
Intel Core i5 3337u (1.8ghz-2.7ghz)
4gb 1600mhz ram
nvidia geforce 720m 2gb
750gb sata 5400rpm hdd
windows 8.1 64bit


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August 9, 2014 9:23:06 PM

photonboy said:
Do you edit video?

More than 8GB of RAM serves no purpose other than to add heat to your computer unless you have a specific use like editing video.

Windows 7 RAM usage:

1GB - multitasking is sluggish
2GB - multitasking is far more responsive
3GB - generally sufficient
4GB - little benefit over 3GB, but recommended for gamers
8GB - no advantage during games but opening/closing games may be faster in some scenarios

16GB - must edit video or do some other task that can actually utilize this much RAM or it will add HEAT to your case

*It's interesting to note that the new NVidia GTX680 adds a feature called GPU Boost that can increase frame rates if the thermal limit is not hit. It's very useful and NVidia said all future NVidia graphics products will use this.

My point about GPU Boost is that if you add more RAM to the case, you raise the heat which will then actually reduce the effectiveness of the graphics card. It will be slight in a properly cooled case but it will exist and why PAY MONEY for a feature that serves ONLY to reduce your gaming experience.

**MORE IS NOT ALWAYS BETTER** (just ask my wife)




I have to disagree. I am NO computer expert, but I have been observing things on my computer since i just built one, and when I increased my RAM from 8GB to 16GB, ArmA3 stopped glitching, and the FPS went up, plus my GPU, that used to always go up to 100% usage, started only going up to the 80%'s. This is what my GPU app has been recording during all my games.

In more detail;

I originally built my computer with the following essential specs;

Asus z97 mobo
Intel i5 4690K
8GB RAM
Radeon R9 270, 2048gb

When I found that ArmA3 still wouldn't play to my likings, I decided to install another 8GB of RAM to make it a total 16GB. I only did this because at this point I didn't have the funds to do anything more. I wasn't expecting much of a difference, but thought what the heck. I had thought it was probably the GPU, and was going to buy another matching GPU to go crossfire in a couple more months.

Instead, I found that the extra 8GB of RAM made a world of difference. Somehow it really took the load off my GPU.

Up till this point, my MSI afterburner GPU overclocking/monitoring application ALWAYS, showed that my GPU usage maxed out at 100% sometime during the game, but after I upgraded to 16GB, my ArmA3 game stopped twitching and stumbling, became mush smoother, and lo and behold, the MSI Afterburner application always shows that the GPU only went up to 88% or 89% during my game.

Like I said i am no computer expert, but I do have powers of observation and this is what I observed.

Maybe some games are extremely reliant on the RAM, more than others?






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August 9, 2014 9:32:19 PM

USAFRet said:
Joanle said:
Maybe, 16GB does more benefit than 8GB.


Today, maybe. 2 years ago when the question was asked? Maybe not so much.


I think everyone knows that. Old threads with their outdated questions should still be updated with current answers, in my opinion. I came here intending to find out if i should go from 16gb to 24 or 32 gb, since going from 8 to 16 made such a dramatic difference.

Partaking in this thread, I think I know my answer; if I intend not to change anything else on my current rig (that I just built) for the next 3 or 4 years, yes then probably even more RAM will be useful - If not now, then in a couple years!
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