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Psu crysis

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August 10, 2011 3:47:07 PM

im going to be buying a new psu soon and my first choice was antec earth watts ea-750W..when i went to the local market to ask about the power supply i learnt that it is not currently available in the market.So now i'm planning to go for the corsair gaming series GS800..

Question 1.I need to know if the corsair GS800 is better than the antec ea-750...better in the sense of reliability,performance etc...

Question 2. the antec earth watts has multi +12V rails where as the cosair GS800 has a single +12V rail..so is that fine? any advantages and disadvantages?


please answer to the point and explain why you would choose one over the other...


my PC specs are:

intel core i5 2400 processor
kingston 8GB ddr3 ram
intel asus p861mle motherboard
nvidia 9600gt 512 MB (going to change this for a gtx 470 or 480)
2 sata hard disks

More about : psu crysis

a b ) Power supply
August 10, 2011 10:27:16 PM

I have not personally had good luck with Antec earthwatts PSU's. I've got two dead ones under my desk... I'd hit the corsair anyday.

A single rail has the advantage that you dont need to worry about load balancing across the rails and is a better solution that multiple rails. Many multiple rail PSU's are actually a single rail unit and the true multirail units usually dont tell you which rail is which.

You can see if Jonnyguru has a review of any PSU you are interested in.
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a b ) Power supply
August 11, 2011 1:32:12 AM

*Answer from a Computer Technician:

Some points:

1) Overall wattage is important, but gamers in particular need to be concerned with the Amperage supplied by the Power Supply. For example, if an NVidia GTX570 requires 38A then the +12V rail (sometimes combined rails) should supply 1.25x this power to be safe.

You must obtain this spec from the manufacturer's site to be certain. It may be in a manual.

2) Overall Wattage is important and can easily be estimated by filling in details to a Wattage Calculator. you should be able to Google one.

3) You would be just fine with something like a Corsair TX750W but there are many good ones. That was mine and it's not necessarily the best value today.

4) The NVidia 400 series are very poor choices of video cards. They run very hot and are outdated anyway. Considering all the money you've already spent, why not get a great card like the NVidia GTX560Ti. Asus and MSI both have great cards.

5) If you are a gamer you should be looking at something like the 560Ti. If you are NOT a gamer you shouldn't be upgrading your system.

I'm a heavy gamer and a computer technician. The 560Ti can play most games at maximum quality on 1920x1080 resolution, but once you drop BELOW that the quality really drops quickly.

6) If you're a gamer, I advise you to choose one of three cards depending on how much you can wait:
#1 - GTX560Ti (available now for about $220)
#2 - Asus 7000 series (available Q4 2011??. spend between $200 and $400)
#3 - NVidia 600 series (avaialable Q1 or Q2 2012. spend between $200 and $400)

7) back to PSU's. NCIX is a good place to start looking. Find prices for PSU's from Antec, Corsair etc in the 750W to 1000W range. Look for a recent article comparing PSU brands.

**And when you finally decide on a PSU (maybe an Antec 750W with 50Amps on the 12V rail as an example), make sure you read at least one good review which analyzes it.

You're looking for the best quality PSU in your budget, hopefully on sale which meets both your Wattge and Amperage needs.

SUMMARY:
1) PSU meets Wattage needs (750W or higher)
2) PSU meets Amperage needs on +12V (1.25x that of the graphics card)
3) quality PSU (read reviews)
4) Graphics card for gamers should spend $200 to $300 in my opinion.
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Related resources
a b ) Power supply
August 11, 2011 1:55:02 AM

Here's my recommendation if you're a gamer (if not, why upgrade?) from the USA NCIX site:

Graphics card:
http://www.ncixus.com/products/?sku=58457&promoid=1307&...

Power Supply:
http://www.ncixus.com/products/?sku=56789&promoid=1307&...

This power supply is an excellent value at the price and will handle any future card you can throw at it. I read a very technical review on its specs and this is excellent for the price.

Installation:
1) Swap PSU's first and test your computer briefly with your old graphics card to ensure no issues

2) Uninstall your current graphics drivers (Add/Remove Program) then turn OFF your computer (do not standby or Hibernate. Must be OFF.)

3) Unplug your power cord.

4) Swap Graphics cards.

5) Turn on your computer.

6) Obtain the latest drivers from the NVIDIA site. Don't use included drivers.

*OTHER:
If you have a stock CPU heatsink you may wish to consider getting a different one for as little as $20. Again, start with NCIX. Your CPU will run much hotter and thus its fan will be much noisier when you have a much better graphics cards stressing it.

I recommend spending roughly $40 on a CPU heatsink + fan.
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August 11, 2011 4:01:43 PM

photonboy said:
*Answer from a Computer Technician:

Some points:

1) Overall wattage is important, but gamers in particular need to be concerned with the Amperage supplied by the Power Supply. For example, if an NVidia GTX570 requires 38A then the +12V rail (sometimes combined rails) should supply 1.25x this power to be safe.

You must obtain this spec from the manufacturer's site to be certain. It may be in a manual.

2) Overall Wattage is important and can easily be estimated by filling in details to a Wattage Calculator. you should be able to Google one.

3) You would be just fine with something like a Corsair TX750W but there are many good ones. That was mine and it's not necessarily the best value today.

4) The NVidia 400 series are very poor choices of video cards. They run very hot and are outdated anyway. Considering all the money you've already spent, why not get a great card like the NVidia GTX560Ti. Asus and MSI both have great cards.

5) If you are a gamer you should be looking at something like the 560Ti. If you are NOT a gamer you shouldn't be upgrading your system.

I'm a heavy gamer and a computer technician. The 560Ti can play most games at maximum quality on 1920x1080 resolution, but once you drop BELOW that the quality really drops quickly.

6) If you're a gamer, I advise you to choose one of three cards depending on how much you can wait:
#1 - GTX560Ti (available now for about $220)
#2 - Asus 7000 series (available Q4 2011??. spend between $200 and $400)
#3 - NVidia 600 series (avaialable Q1 or Q2 2012. spend between $200 and $400)

7) back to PSU's. NCIX is a good place to start looking. Find prices for PSU's from Antec, Corsair etc in the 750W to 1000W range. Look for a recent article comparing PSU brands.

**And when you finally decide on a PSU (maybe an Antec 750W with 50Amps on the 12V rail as an example), make sure you read at least one good review which analyzes it.

You're looking for the best quality PSU in your budget, hopefully on sale which meets both your Wattge and Amperage needs.

SUMMARY:
1) PSU meets Wattage needs (750W or higher)
2) PSU meets Amperage needs on +12V (1.25x that of the graphics card)
3) quality PSU (read reviews)
4) Graphics card for gamers should spend $200 to $300 in my opinion.





corsair gaming series GS-800W has 65A on the +12V rail...overall great reviews but the +3.3V does not perform well...what is the +3.3V rail used for?
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August 11, 2011 4:03:58 PM

photonboy said:
Here's my recommendation if you're a gamer (if not, why upgrade?) from the USA NCIX site:

Graphics card:
http://www.ncixus.com/products/?sku=58457&promoid=1307&...

Power Supply:
http://www.ncixus.com/products/?sku=56789&promoid=1307&...

This power supply is an excellent value at the price and will handle any future card you can throw at it. I read a very technical review on its specs and this is excellent for the price.

Installation:
1) Swap PSU's first and test your computer briefly with your old graphics card to ensure no issues

2) Uninstall your current graphics drivers (Add/Remove Program) then turn OFF your computer (do not standby or Hibernate. Must be OFF.)

3) Unplug your power cord.

4) Swap Graphics cards.

5) Turn on your computer.

6) Obtain the latest drivers from the NVIDIA site. Don't use included drivers.

*OTHER:
If you have a stock CPU heatsink you may wish to consider getting a different one for as little as $20. Again, start with NCIX. Your CPU will run much hotter and thus its fan will be much noisier when you have a much better graphics cards stressing it.

I recommend spending roughly $40 on a CPU heatsink + fan.




the psu you recommended is not available in the market...would you choose antec ea-750 or corsair GS-800?
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a b ) Power supply
August 13, 2011 11:07:28 PM

gs0800.
3.3v is used for pci & pcie bus, old memory, and even older processors. The sata power has 3.3v wired but I dont know of a device that uses it since the molex to sata power adapters dont have 3.3v and everything I've used works with the adapters just fine too.
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