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Two IIS Servers' One External IP

Last response: in Networking
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August 16, 2010 9:21:38 PM

Hi, I have a massive problem today.

I have two computers running IIS (5.1 & 7.0) But they share the same external IP and are both on my Belkin 54g router. Typing in my IP will bring you to the 5.1 site, but I need a way to have access to both sites using my external IP . Both of my domains are registered with 123-Reg but I cannot add a port on an A name record IP on their DNS settings (I want 123.123.123.123:81, but I can only have an IP on it's own.) I have a screen shot of their settings page. All I want to do is add a port to the end of an IP, so people can access both sites using different ports (81 & 80). Hope this all makes sense to you. Any other methods of running two IIS servers on one IP will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

More about : iis servers external

August 16, 2010 9:35:46 PM

I don't think you can do that. Let's say the IP = house # of the computer, then the port = door #. So you can access the same house through different doors, but it will always hit that same house.

I may be wrong however, but I don't think I have ever seen redirection to 2 PCs off one IP.
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August 17, 2010 1:52:04 AM

First make sure that ports 80 and 81 are open and listening go to "run" and type CMD and then type netstat -an.

In your routing port forward sttings open port 80 to forward to the ip of one the computers and then do the same with port 81 to forward to the other ip.

Let me know.
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August 17, 2010 9:01:08 AM

I can forward the ports, but I can't set the A record to have a port at the end of the IP. 123-Reg's settings won't allow it and that is my main problem. I need ways to solve this.
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August 17, 2010 2:51:41 PM

I would say you would want to Cluster your IIS servers. The cluster will have a single IP address that you would forward to. The cluster woudl then point to two additional IP addresses, one for each IIS server.

But if you can't cluster, you can basically only forward the ports. port 80 goes to one server, port 81 goes to the other server.

Then again, if you had some form of network load balancing in place, you could do a 50/50 split on the NLB to do the job. I doubt you have a NLB.. but you might be able to set something up in Windows.
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August 17, 2010 3:07:43 PM

rhydiansmith said:
I can forward the ports, but I can't set the A record to have a port at the end of the IP. 123-Reg's settings won't allow it and that is my main problem. I need ways to solve this.



123-Reg's should only forward to your home IP. Your router should forward the right port to the right internal IP (the server).

Then, when you type in your 123-Reg IP from somewhere else, also add the port you want to use, e.g.: http://123Reg.com:81

123-Reg will then replace 123Reg.com by your external IP, e.g.: 123.123.123.123 and the port will stay.
From there, your router should receive the request for a webpage, and depending on the port asked, will forward the request to the right server.

So, here are the steps you need to do :
1. setup 123Reg forwarding to your external ip
2. setup your router for port forwarding
3. to access your webpage, type in your 123Reg address, then the port number.
4. it works :) 
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August 17, 2010 3:33:23 PM

seacliff said:
123-Reg's should only forward to your home IP. Your router should forward the right port to the right internal IP (the server).

Then, when you type in your 123-Reg IP from somewhere else, also add the port you want to use, e.g.: http://123Reg.com:81

123-Reg will then replace 123Reg.com by your external IP, e.g.: 123.123.123.123 and the port will stay.
From there, your router should receive the request for a webpage, and depending on the port asked, will forward the request to the right server.

So, here are the steps you need to do :
1. setup 123Reg forwarding to your external ip
2. setup your router for port forwarding
3. to access your webpage, type in your 123Reg address, then the port number.
4. it works :) 


I think you've misunderstood. 123-reg is the company that I have registered my domains with. Their DNS settings page will not let me add a port at the end of the IP I want people to reach when they type in the domain name.
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August 17, 2010 4:49:05 PM

rhydiansmith said:
I think you've misunderstood. 123-reg is the company that I have registered my domains with. Their DNS settings page will not let me add a port at the end of the IP I want people to reach when they type in the domain name.



That is exactly what I am saying. You don't need to setup 123-reg for ports. You have to manually add the port at the end of the address.
e.g.: mx0.123-reg.co.uk:81 or mx0.123-reg.co.uk:81 <-- this is what you type in the address bar.

Try it using mx0.123-reg.co.uk:80. This will be forward to your home using the default http port, which is 80. If you setup your router port forwarding correctly, you'll be able to use the same link, but change the port number.

Read that : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_Name_System

DNS resolve name, not port. They are 2 different things.
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Best solution

August 17, 2010 5:58:59 PM

Basically he's saying you go to your website... www.tomshardware.com for example. In order to access the IIS servers, one server would have port 80 forwarded to it, the other would have 81 forwarded to it.

If you wanted to access your port 80 IIS server you would type: www.tomshardware.com:80
If you wanted to access your port 81 IIS server you would type:
www.tomshardware.com:81

You're stuck adding the port name in there. Now, you could have all default websites hit your first IIS server and then within your links on the website you could point it to the other server using the port method.
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August 17, 2010 7:31:30 PM

That's exactly my problem, I don't want to have to add a port on the end of an address.
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August 17, 2010 8:04:11 PM

There is nothing you can do about it, unless you do as riser told, and link your second IIS server from the first one.

Internet is made of IP addresses and ports, and there is no way to get around it.
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August 17, 2010 9:53:05 PM

Best answer selected by rhydiansmith.
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