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Help with Prebuilt vs Homebuilt!

Last response: in Systems
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May 18, 2011 8:33:55 PM

I've played WoW on 1 gig of ram since 08 and its getting to be quite frustrating, so when looking for a new computer, i went find a good, homebuilt setup which i got from the homebuilt section of these forums.

But my mother is skeptical about how much money i will save by making it homebuilt, and wants me to just get a prebuilt, so after giving her a shot i came up with this (this price doesn't include keyboard/mouse/monitor)

Operating system Genuine Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit
Processor Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-2300 quad-core processor [2.8GHz, 6MB cache]
Memory 6GB DDR3-1333MHz SDRAM [3 DIMMs]
Hard drive 1TB 7200 rpm SATA 3Gb/s hard drive
Graphics card 1GB DDR3 NVIDIA GeForce 405 [DVI, HDMI, VGA adapter]
Primary optical drive LightScribe 16X max. DVD+/-R/RW SuperMulti drive

Total: $850

Now, I don't think i need a 1tb harddrive but it was a free upgrade from 750gb, which for me is still too much, So my question to you guys, If i got a new computer for WoW (Only game i play), would i save a lot of money by building my own computer? If so can i get an idea of how much better and for how less.

Thanks!

More about : prebuilt homebuilt

a b B Homebuilt system
May 19, 2011 1:25:40 AM

See the build advice form in my signature, but You would want RAM in multiples of 2 (Dual Channel not Triple) so 2x4GB or 2x2GB. Also you could use a more powerful GPU - maybe a
Sapphire Radeon HD 6770 -$125-

There are many advantages to building your own, not just saving money. Also, it helps you get the best parts for your money, higher quality ones, and allows you to learn a good deal.
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May 19, 2011 4:12:08 AM

Another way of looking at it...

Let the shop people get all the headaches and hours of trying to fine tune the machine, installing programs and O/S, all for around 50 bucks, whilst you chill and hang out with your mates until it's ready...

Or...

You could do it all yourself, save the 50 bucks they would have charged, and as baker says, learn how to do it yourself and how to trouble shoot any dramas that may arise.

The advantage to the first option is obvious, but it's disadvantages may include that you are limited to the parts that the shop people have available and what sort of warranty do they provide (if any).

The advantage of the second is that you can do it all yourself (look ma, no hands) and troubleshoot anything down the line, but (disadvantages) it may cost you more when putting it together (you forgot to earth yourself before you picked up the CPU, so you may have to buy another etc), or you get stuck, have no idea what to do and end up taking it to the shop.

Long story short... If you know what you're doing (or want to learn) build yourself, if not, don't.
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