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Nintendo Not Allowing Third-Party Sound Engines for DS

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Anonymous
July 15, 2004 4:01:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube (More info?)

http://nintendoinsider.com/site/EplAlFpVkuMXOSgEIi.php

Nintendo Insider has learned exclusively that Nintendo is currently
not allowing third-parties to create sound engines for the Nintendo
DS, and much less do sound work for other developers, as many
developers did with the Game Boy Advance, stating "the ARM7 has been
excluded from direct access for commercial reasons."

The ARM7 processor in the Nintendo DS handles the Wi-Fi, the audio and
the touch screen. In order to even create sound engines for the
Nintendo DS, our sources note that one would probably have to take
apart the entire ARM7 processor and hardware routines for Wi-Fi, touch
screen and audio to see what memory and function calls the processor
uses. Otherwise, one would never know where to put one's code. This
means developers can't write their own "music replayer, sound effects
mixer [or] a decent music GUI for musicians" who don't know much about
scripting and programming. We hear that the majority of U.S. and
European developers are quite angry, or are complaining, about this.

What does this mean for you? For one, sound in third-party games might
not be up to snuff at first with the Nintendo DS. It also restrains
freelance musicians and developers from offering their services to DS,
meaning a paycheck that many had usually expected will not be coming
in for many third-party developers -- and that could mean less
resources for many to create DS games.

But developers are hoping that this rule will be done away with soon.
"I have hopes they will change it... they say they take our feedback
into consideration," said one developer speaking on the condition of
anonymity.
Anonymous
July 15, 2004 11:25:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube (More info?)

This is not surprising. Nintendo has a history of taking a good thing, then
shooting itself in the foot. If the N64 had been CD based, it would have
crushed the Playstation. Ignoring online play for the Cube is also hurting
them a bit.

"R420" <radeonr420@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:51488ce2.0407142239.686171fb@posting.google.com...
> http://nintendoinsider.com/site/EplAlFpVkuMXOSgEIi.php
>
> Nintendo Insider has learned exclusively that Nintendo is currently
> not allowing third-parties to create sound engines for the Nintendo
> DS, and much less do sound work for other developers, as many
> developers did with the Game Boy Advance, stating "the ARM7 has been
> excluded from direct access for commercial reasons."
>
> The ARM7 processor in the Nintendo DS handles the Wi-Fi, the audio and
> the touch screen. In order to even create sound engines for the
> Nintendo DS, our sources note that one would probably have to take
> apart the entire ARM7 processor and hardware routines for Wi-Fi, touch
> screen and audio to see what memory and function calls the processor
> uses. Otherwise, one would never know where to put one's code. This
> means developers can't write their own "music replayer, sound effects
> mixer [or] a decent music GUI for musicians" who don't know much about
> scripting and programming. We hear that the majority of U.S. and
> European developers are quite angry, or are complaining, about this.
>
> What does this mean for you? For one, sound in third-party games might
> not be up to snuff at first with the Nintendo DS. It also restrains
> freelance musicians and developers from offering their services to DS,
> meaning a paycheck that many had usually expected will not be coming
> in for many third-party developers -- and that could mean less
> resources for many to create DS games.
>
> But developers are hoping that this rule will be done away with soon.
> "I have hopes they will change it... they say they take our feedback
> into consideration," said one developer speaking on the condition of
> anonymity.
!