Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

PCI-E x16 mobo w/ PCI-E 2.0 card?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
March 12, 2011 6:25:08 AM

Hey guys, I had a few quick questions that I'm sure you guys can easily answer.

Well, we have an old computer mobo that I'm thinking of using to setup for our youngest in the family. The mobo is an ECS 945PL-A (1.0) LGA 775 Intel 945PL Express ATX Intel Motherboard (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168..." target="_blank">link[/url). I know that its max is 2gb of ram, so I'll put that on there.

But the real question now is, I have a spare 300W power and EVGA GTS 450. Will the power be enough to have the GTS 450 running on that mobo? Heck, can the GTS 450 even work on that mobo? Should I switch out the power to something more if that card can run on that mobo? If so, what power do you guys suggest?

Thanks!

More about : pci x16 mobo pci card

Best solution

a c 129 U Graphics card
March 12, 2011 9:52:30 AM

Though not infallable, components built to PCI express specs should work. The 450 should work fine on that motherboard:

http://www.ecsusa.com/ECSWebSite/Product/Product_Detail...

Though, there have been instances where newer video cards built to 2.0 or 2.1 specs don't work in older systems (your manual says the southbridge ICH7 chipset supports 2.3 spec, but the slot supports 1.0 specifications?).

From a pure wattage standpoint, your power supply would suffice:

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/graphics/2010/09/13/nv...

but it probably does not have the amps on the 12V rail to support the gts 450.

Whether or not it's necessary, the best thing you can do to preserve older parts and PCs is to give them new power every few years. For that setup, I'd grab a basic 80plus PSU with enough amps to power the more modern graphics card:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Rosewill is not the absolute best brand, but for $45, and 33A on the 12V rail, it gives you the power for that card and your processor with a little to spare.

Here's a review of the video card containing power consumption for a system using this card:

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/graphics/2010/09/13/nv...

I would suggest getting a new PSU. Try the video card in the system. If it works, great. Worst case scenario... You have to pay $30 for a basic video card on top of the power supply. $75 to keep a system running for a few more years really isn't that bad.

I have an old Pentium 4 system where I cleaned it out, changed out the power supply and gave it to one of my kids to use for school, write papers, browse the web etc... It's still clipping along just fine after 8 years.
Share
March 12, 2011 10:18:32 AM

Thanks for the quick reply ubercake.

Do you think this PSU might work?
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Also, assuming the PSU is switched out and the graphic card is put in, would the 2GB be the real bottleneck in the system? The system currently runs off a Pentium D. Any other chip I could use with that mobo?

Thanks.
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 129 U Graphics card
March 12, 2011 10:31:35 AM

aoilemon said:
Thanks for the quick reply ubercake.

Do you think this PSU might work?
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Also, assuming the PSU is switched out and the graphic card is put in, would the 2GB be the real bottleneck in the system? The system currently runs off a Pentium D. Any other chip I could use with that mobo?

Thanks.

That's a great brand, it has enough Amps (28) and watts available on the 12V rail for what you need, but it's not 80-plus certified. That's the only reason I didn't choose this one. It will work. If you're not concerned with the efficiency, it will save you $25 with that $20 rebate (Wow! I didn't see that!). That would put your worst case scenario at around $55, if you do have to replace the graphics card. Go for it!
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
March 12, 2011 10:34:20 AM

^+1
m
0
l
March 12, 2011 11:44:38 AM

Best answer selected by aoilemon.
m
0
l
!