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A8-3850 APU vs (Phenom II X6 1100T + Radeon HD 6570)

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August 20, 2011 1:06:29 AM

Well i'm thinking of creating a powerful PC that will act as the server for my company... recenctly AMD released the APU and after viewing what its about and seeing how it stacks against intel, I wanted to know how does it stack agaisnt its own company.

So, I don't care about the money (well just a little) lol , i just want to know, which is better in performance:

A8-3850 APU - with the best mobo

vs

(Phenom II X6 1100T + Radeon HD 6570) - I put these 2 together because since the APU has an integrated radeon HD 6550 i think that by numerical classification this would be the GPU to compare it to - on its best mobo too.


What I want to know is, which should I use for my server (most importantly), how do they stack against each other (which is best for which type of operation), and finally the price... I was also thinking... that if I were to add the another GPU to the APU (making a crossfire) which GPU are the ones that I can use, and if I do this, will it be significantly better?

Thank you
a c 93 à CPUs
August 20, 2011 1:41:09 AM

For a server, the Phenom II X6 set up would probably be better. The Llano APUs make sacrifices in CPU performance in order to get better integrated graphics performance. The Llano CPU cores tend to remain clocked low, even in CPU intensive applications. Since servers don't need that much graphical horsepower, getting Llano for better graphics would be pointless. The hybrid Crossfire options for Llano also tend to be a bit buggy right now, hybrid Crossfire does not work properly in all applications, sometimes yielding lower performance than what either the APU or Graphics Card would get on its own.
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August 20, 2011 1:56:28 AM

hmmm... ok cool Phenom 1 APU 0 (as a server processor) btw, if I were building a gaming pc, then should I use the APU and the hybrid crossfire then?
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a c 93 à CPUs
August 20, 2011 2:04:44 AM

For a gaming desktop I wouldn't bother with the APU and save more money to get a better graphics card and a stand-alone CPU. Hybrid Crossfire has issues with a number of games and if you are looking to play at high resolution, neither the APU or hybrid Crossfire will give you sufficient horsepower to play at high settings on the higher resolutions. CPU intensive games may not perform as well on the APU as they would on a conventional PC due to the lower clockspeeds on the CPU part of the APU. The APU boards also have no upgrade path, future APUs are supposed to go on a different socket.

The Llano APUs are really meant more for giving passable gaming capabilities to sub $1000 laptops and offering an all-in-one option for HTPCs, or PCs meant for very light gaming rather than acting a serious contender as a desktop gaming platform.
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a c 93 à CPUs
August 20, 2011 2:23:54 AM

The i7 in that video uses intel's integrated graphics. Intel's integrated graphics have always been horrible when rendering 3D graphics. The advantage Llano has is considerably better graphics, and in the video, all the demos where Llano is superior is in rendering 3D graphics. For CPU specific applications the i7 is superior to any of AMD's current offerings. As far as gaming desktops go, it is better to have a more powerful CPU paired with a more powerful GPU than the current APU solutions which are a compromise that offer okay, but not stellar performance in both areas.
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August 20, 2011 3:27:38 AM

but the apu that was used on the video was the desktop verson?? agaisnt the intel's integrated gpu + i7? that sounds about right to be compared to.. just making sure I got it right. so I guess that the APU will be the best in mobile gaming and HTPC correct?

So what would you recommed for a gaming desktop AMD or Intel? and while ur at it, what would u recommend for a server, AMD or intel? oh, and which processor too respectively ;)  thanks
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a b à CPUs
August 20, 2011 3:40:50 AM

The A-8 series is an economical desktop integrated system, NOT a powerful system. The Phenom II X6 1100T and discrete graphics would be far better for your needs.
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a c 93 à CPUs
August 20, 2011 3:41:02 AM

The APU in the video was the laptop version going up against the quad core laptop version of the i7 using intel's integrated graphics. The APU is definitely advantageous for a lower cost gaming laptop, but for desktop there are CPU and GPU combos that cost about the same and perform better than the APU.

Intel has the better processors right now, if your computer does a lot of CPU heavy things you will most likely get better performance out of an intel CPU. AMD's advantage is value, their CPUs aren't as fast as intel's but are priced much lower, an AMD quad core can be had for about $120 right now, while the cheapest intel quad cores go for about $180-200.

Servers tend to need more CPU horsepower, so intel would probably be a better buy, assuming you aren't on a really tight budget.

For a gaming desktop, either intel or AMD will work okay, though the current intel processors are probably much more 'futureproof', they are quite powerful, and won't fall into obsolescence for quite a long time, particularly if you get the ones with the unlocked multipliers, allowing for some impressive overclocking capabilities. A Sandy Bridge i5 will probably still be a viable gaming CPU 4 or 5 years from now, a current Phenom II X4 might not be.
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a c 103 à CPUs
August 20, 2011 1:22:18 PM

Radeon HD 6570 in a server is serious overkill, it will spend 99.5% of its life with e screen off or in power save mode.

Scrap the idea of building one and get yourself a nice Dell, HP or Fujitsu Tower/rack server.

You'll be saving yourself a heap of headaches and you might have a few £££ left over for something to play on ;) 
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August 21, 2011 11:54:10 PM

That's the kind of information i've been trying to get das_stig :D  ... i mean the use I have for it are:
1. always on - for remote loggins and other many reasons
2. hot swap capable - because I have many clients that want me to rescue their data
3. 3 screen viewable - I want to run 2 screen on my desk to work with and 1 would be in the waiting room for my office with tech news videos (this is why I think i need a very good graphics card)
4. video enconding - I do alot of tutorials and upload them to youtube and you windows movie maker to do them (btw, if you know of a better "amateur" vid editing software please link me, or let me know)
5. awesome appeal - a lot of the work I do, is build custom PC (especially gaming) for clients, and I want them to be awed by my server/PC too

So, do you still think I should go with Dell, HP etc for a server or would you build one?

Also, thanks for clearing the APU vs CPU battle I had going on my head lol. I'm 100% sure now that I don't want an APU for whatever I end up doing. Though from the looks of it, i'm probably ending with Intel unless my video enconding and 3 screens will need "gaming type" scenario in which I prefer AMD for gaming.

So, according to my needs established above, please give me your final recommendation :D  - Thank you
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August 24, 2011 12:27:38 AM

please reply... thank you
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a c 745 à CPUs
August 24, 2011 1:06:42 AM

Please don't bump your post!
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August 24, 2011 9:47:11 AM

suresh419 said:

5. awesome appeal - a lot of the work I do, is build custom PC (especially gaming) for clients, and I want them to be awed by my server/PC too



if you build computers how are you not savvy with computers?
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a b à CPUs
August 24, 2011 5:02:40 PM

This is a multi purpose system from the posts that I have read and I recommend that you avoid building this system with the expectation of also using it as your personal workstation. Why the first reason is security and then reliability. Never use the server as your personal computer in any given company as it is bad practice. I suggest that you split this two ways and build a workstation and then a server on the side. If one is to crash the other will still be up and running. Security is a big concern and is a common mistake for administrators to use servers as their personal workstations as someone could easily just walk in and mess with things. As for the server its self it does not need a discrete card that is considered gaming worthy.
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August 26, 2011 9:48:08 PM

nforce4max said:
This is a multi purpose system from the posts that I have read and I recommend that you avoid building this system with the expectation of also using it as your personal workstation. Why the first reason is security and then reliability. Never use the server as your personal computer in any given company as it is bad practice. I suggest that you split this two ways and build a workstation and then a server on the side. If one is to crash the other will still be up and running. Security is a big concern and is a common mistake for administrators to use servers as their personal workstations as someone could easily just walk in and mess with things. As for the server its self it does not need a discrete card that is considered gaming worthy.


I very much like your advise, and I think that you are right. I guess I should build a powerful game-worthy workstation, and also a server.


Power PC for all powerful needs, and 3 screen capable and the server for hot swapping and data storage.

... man, let's see if I have money for this... lol... can I have some suggestions
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September 6, 2011 1:00:55 AM

In my own opinion I don't think this is the right way to approach a server configuration. Typically a server is going to be on-demand use and should have minimum interaction with the desktop. Using a desktop operating system like Windows 7 with discrete graphics is not going to be the best choice for a server.

I saw your requirements, but I think you are setting up a hybrid of a couple of different types of computer roles. Might I suggest building a server this way:

Multi-CPU
RAID Drives in a RAID 5 configuration. (4 drives).
Linux Server OS or Windows 2008 R2

You should not hook up monitors after its initial setup for security reasons...

nforce4max touches on the same points I make.
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September 6, 2011 1:12:23 AM

Now for your gaming computer:

If you want to have three displays you're going to need to have the necessary amount of display ports (not to be confused with the connection) for three displays. I suggest getting two medium range video cards such as the Radeon 6700 Series.

As for your CPU you will benefit with multiple cores if you are doing a lot of computational tasks, such as play physics based games (Battlefield Bad Company 2), or doing AutoCAD or converting video. Phenom II x4 is fine. You can overclock a black edition and be fine.

Pick a compatible motherboard and get at least 8GB of RAM. PC1600 will actually go to 1333 because of limitations of the CPU (unless overclocked).

I think this is more than an adequate system. But I would like to add this.

In my recent builds/computers:

Apple MacBook Pro 2011 | Quad Core i7 2.3Ghz | 8GB 1600 | MSI Lightning HD 6970 | 250GB SSD
MSI 890FXA-GD75 | AMD Phenom II x6 1090T | 8GB 1600 | 2x80GB SSD

I bolded the SSD's because this is the single greatest performance increase overall I've seen in a computer. While getting a great video card certainly will display your games well, the SSD is by far a overall performance increase.

Thanks,

Kris
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September 7, 2011 12:46:17 AM

sirkgm14vg said:
Now for your gaming computer:

If you want to have three displays you're going to need to have the necessary amount of display ports (not to be confused with the connection) for three displays. I suggest getting two medium range video cards such as the Radeon 6700 Series.

As for your CPU you will benefit with multiple cores if you are doing a lot of computational tasks, such as play physics based games (Battlefield Bad Company 2), or doing AutoCAD or converting video. Phenom II x4 is fine. You can overclock a black edition and be fine.

Pick a compatible motherboard and get at least 8GB of RAM. PC1600 will actually go to 1333 because of limitations of the CPU (unless overclocked).

I think this is more than an adequate system. But I would like to add this.

In my recent builds/computers:

Apple MacBook Pro 2011 | Quad Core i7 2.3Ghz | 8GB 1600 | MSI Lightning HD 6970 | 250GB SSD
MSI 890FXA-GD75 | AMD Phenom II x6 1090T | 8GB 1600 | 2x80GB SSD

I bolded the SSD's because this is the single greatest performance increase overall I've seen in a computer. While getting a great video card certainly will display your games well, the SSD is by far a overall performance increase.

Thanks,

Kris



I think i'm gonna go your way :D  ... thank you very much, now i have some small details I would like to ask you

1. how do you build a server?... i mean the real server your suggesting. I'm guessing it should be rack mounted right? or in a case? I really have no idea how to approach this. Please suggest: processor, motherboard, case, memory, harddrives... and other materials I need so I can do the shopping... i'm thinking that building it is the same way to build any other PC, so I have no probs with that...

2. I'm assuming that if I do create the server and the power/gaming PC, I will be saving all my information on the server. So i'm thiking that also, for security reasons I shouldn't install log me in on the server or dropbox, so how would I be able to access its files from my home PC or my laptop when i'm repairing at a client's home or business??? i'm heard about VPNs, but I really don't know how do they work. My theory is that making the right installation I should be able to view my server's hdd on my laptop as a "network" drive, even when i'm not physically there using just internet connection, is this assumption correct?
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September 8, 2011 8:52:44 AM

suresh419 said:
I think i'm gonna go your way :D  ... thank you very much, now i have some small details I would like to ask you

1. how do you build a server?... i mean the real server your suggesting. I'm guessing it should be rack mounted right? or in a case? I really have no idea how to approach this. Please suggest: processor, motherboard, case, memory, harddrives... and other materials I need so I can do the shopping... i'm thinking that building it is the same way to build any other PC, so I have no probs with that...

2. I'm assuming that if I do create the server and the power/gaming PC, I will be saving all my information on the server. So i'm thiking that also, for security reasons I shouldn't install log me in on the server or dropbox, so how would I be able to access its files from my home PC or my laptop when i'm repairing at a client's home or business??? i'm heard about VPNs, but I really don't know how do they work. My theory is that making the right installation I should be able to view my server's hdd on my laptop as a "network" drive, even when i'm not physically there using just internet connection, is this assumption correct?


If u want a server then buy xeon processors, amd a8 processor is budget cpu with low end performance in pc apps and good performance for budget gaming. :sol:  :sol:  :sol:  :sol: 
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November 15, 2011 6:10:18 PM

It is not really that serious server or computer anyway.

I would suggest just get a couple APU systems just with built in video. That will all you need.
As for hot swapping, just use external usb 3.0 drive.

You can get some with internal swappable for a practice. But I doubt you really need anything too expensive or serious.
In fact, for a server extra low performance version such as E350 chip will probably be better for saving power.

If you want to demo, you can always add graphics card.
APU is good since 2 core and gpu can be disabled and two core can be over clocked.
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a b à CPUs
November 15, 2011 8:29:47 PM

If you're going to build a server get a server board , redundant PSU's and serious equipment , not gaming gear . SSD might be fast but in a server ? Really ? Not yet The servers I've built have all been $1,500.00 for the el cheapo and go up quickly from there .
How serious a server you need , what kind of reliability you looking for/need ??
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