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New Build Comments (mid-end of June Purchase)

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May 26, 2011 5:30:40 AM

Approximate Purchase Date: Mid-End of June

Budget Range: $1200 - $1500 Cdn (before taxes)

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Internet, Gaming, Email, Office, Multimedia playback/editing, Virtual machine

Parts Not Required:
Samsung SyncMaster 2493HM 24” 16:10 Monitor (1900x1200 resolution)
Microsoft Wireless Keyboard/Mouse
Microsoft Wireless Xbox 360 Controller
Logitech 2.1 Speakers
Windows 7 Ultimate x64
Auzentech X-Fi Prelude 7.1
DVD/CD drive
DVD/CD RW drive
5.25” Card Reader w/ 1x IEEE and 1x USB ports
750GB Seagate Barracuda SATA II 7200rpm HDD (repartitioning for programs, data and backup)

Parts To Replace:
2x 250GB Seagate Barracuda SATA II 7200rpm HDDs (converting to external)

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Canada Computers, Tiger Direct, NCIX (they have brick and mortar stores which I prefer to pickup rather than have shipped)

Country of Origin: Canada

Parts Preferences: Intel Sandy Bridge components

Overclocking: Maybe in future

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe in future

Monitor Resolution: 1900x1200

I am looking at a mid-end gaming machine.

Some games I have:
Mass Effect 1 & 2
Dawn of War Series (1 & 2)
Command and Conquer Series (+Red Alert)
Witcher 1 Director's Cut
Portal 1
Tomb Raider Series
Dark Siders

Parts I am currently considering:
Final Build:

Case: Silverstone Raven 3 E-ATX - $137.31
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=60646&vpn=RV03B-W&manu...

CPU: Intel i5-2500K - $229.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=4...

Mobo: Asus P8P67 Pro (Rev. 3.0) - $184.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=2...

Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus - $29.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=8...

Memory: G.SKILL Ripjaws X (F3-12800CL7D-8GBXH) - $129.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=2...

PSU: Antec TP-750 - $119.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=3...

GPU: EVGA GTX560 1GB (01G-P3-1460-KR) - $195.98
Change to: Asus ENGTX560 Ti DCII/2DI/1GD5 - $249.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=4...

HDD (Boot): OCZ Agility 3 60GB (AGT3-25SAT3-60G) - $139.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=1...

HDD (Gaming): WD Caviar Black 1TB (WD1002FAEX) - $84.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=1...

Total: $1253.22 $1307.23 Cdn

Any better ideas? Thoughts? Improvements?

Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
May 26, 2011 5:34:29 AM

Looks solid! You could get a 3Gb/s HDD to save a few bucks, wouldn't cost you any performance. The weak point is going to be that 560, you may want to upgrade it to a TI or get a 6950, but it's not a requirement. (I hope that's the original Witcher and not the second?)
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May 27, 2011 4:58:50 AM

jbakerlent said:
Looks solid! You could get a 3Gb/s HDD to save a few bucks, wouldn't cost you any performance. The weak point is going to be that 560, you may want to upgrade it to a TI or get a 6950, but it's not a requirement. (I hope that's the original Witcher and not the second?)


Thanks for the reply. :D 

I looked at a few 560ti's. Do you know which of these might be good. I prefer Nvidia mainly for Cuda (HD video playback/streaming/transcoding) and PhysX (some games). Unless AMD is better overall?

MSI GeForce GTX 560 Ti Twin Frozr OC (N560GTX-TI Twin Frozr II/OC) - $279.99
http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=58303&vpn=N560GTX-TI%2...

Zotac GeForce GTX 560 Ti OC (ZT-50303-10M) - $254.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=4...

EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti DS Superclocked (01G-P3-1567-AR) - $264.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=4...

Asus ENGTX560 Ti DCII/2DI/1GD5 - $249.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=4...

Whoops. I forgot Witcher had a second installment. I have the original director's cut.

Edit: I forgot, is it a good idea to use thermal paste like this one:

Arctic Cooling Arctic MX-4 Thermal Compound - $9.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=8...
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Best solution

May 27, 2011 6:59:29 AM

I would probably get the Asus - cheap and decent (although any would be fine). For the thermal paste, you don't have to get it as the Hyper comes with some.
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May 27, 2011 5:17:30 PM

jbakerlent said:
I would probably get the Asus - cheap and decent (although any would be fine). For the thermal paste, you don't have to get it as the Hyper comes with some.


Thanks again.

Sorry, just a few more questions just popped into my head.

Just looking over a few threads and seen some suggestions for ASRock. Apparently (from my understanding), it's the 'consumer' branch of Asus? I wonder if it would be any better or on par with the Asus.

Edit: And for future (if I decide to get another SSD), would it be any more beneficial to consider the Z68 for its SSD caching?

ASRock P67 Extreme4 - $169.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=2...

ASRock Z68 Extreme4 - $204.99
http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=2...

And finally, do you think it would be wise to get a UPS? The reason I ask is sometimes (very seldom) we will get brown outs or black outs. Would this be a safe bet and added protection for the new system (as well as data)? Is it warranted? If so, can you recommend a brand to look at? Or are all just equally the same in what they do and are reliable?

Thanks again for your help. It's greatly appreciated.
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May 27, 2011 8:38:07 PM

Yes, ASRock is great as well. They're a bit more "budget" oriented that Asus, but still make great products. As for SRT, I personally would rather purchase a medium sized SSD and use it as a separate drive letter. IMO, SRT is most useful for people looking for simplicity - not having to manage what goes where, etc. Regarding the UPS, I wouldn't get one (I'd just use a surge suppressor) unless the computer has data that cannot be turned off without warning. To clarify, if you just want to protect your components, it's not necessary. If you need to have a warning before your computer is shutdown (battery backup), then get it.
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May 28, 2011 5:03:29 PM

jbakerlent said:
Yes, ASRock is great as well. They're a bit more "budget" oriented that Asus, but still make great products. As for SRT, I personally would rather purchase a medium sized SSD and use it as a separate drive letter. IMO, SRT is most useful for people looking for simplicity - not having to manage what goes where, etc. Regarding the UPS, I wouldn't get one (I'd just use a surge suppressor) unless the computer has data that cannot be turned off without warning. To clarify, if you just want to protect your components, it's not necessary. If you need to have a warning before your computer is shutdown (battery backup), then get it.


Okay, thanks for the info. I'll stick with what I already changed and listed. Thanks for all your help.

On a side note: I read there are 'bugs' with these new P67 boards (mainly with BIOS). Random boots, reboots, etc. at power up. Is it more of a nuisance than a concern? It's not going to 'hurt' anything in the long run? Sorry, this is going to be my first build and just wanted to double check. Thanks again.
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May 28, 2011 5:07:29 PM

SSD caching is worthless, you get better performance with using SSD alone as system disk.

UPS is worth it if you run critical applications or if you have issue with voltage stability in your location. If this is not issue, just get power surge protection.

@jbakerlent : if you get fast drops and increase in powerline voltage its thing that can easily kill any electronics.
Currently in our country we have this issue on some locations caused by solar powerplants as when sun hid or come out from from behind cloud its causing huge spikes of voltage increase/decrease as normal powerplants need time to compensate.
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May 28, 2011 5:27:00 PM

xrodney said:
SSD caching is worthless, you get better performance with using SSD alone as system disk.

UPS is worth it if you run critical applications or if you have issue with voltage stability in your location. If this is not issue, just get power surge protection.

@jbakerlent : if you get fast drops and increase in powerline voltage its thing that can easily kill any electronics.
Currently in our country we have this issue on some locations caused by solar powerplants as when sun hid or come out from from behind cloud its causing huge spikes of voltage increase/decrease as normal powerplants need time to compensate.


I am currently using a power surge protector and brown/black outs seldom happen. Voltage seems consistent (or so I would think) as none of the surge protectors are ever tripped. I don't really run critical applications, and I backup data on a frequent basis. So I guess I should be 'safe'.

Thanks for the input.
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May 28, 2011 5:34:11 PM

Surge protector wont trip on those surges, they are usually too small but high enough to cause damage.
Surge protectors only try block high voltage spikes, for example caused by lighting or feedback pulse caused by some devices.
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May 29, 2011 4:22:30 AM

Best answer selected by neograndizer.
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