Wattage at wall question..

I have never measured but if something says it measures wattage at the wall at 719watts does it measure the same at the psu? Or higher or lower?
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More about wattage wall question
  1. Whatever the wattage reading is at the wall is what the PSU is drawing, aka the "load" the PSU applies to the grid power.
  2. is it higher or lower anywhere else in the system?
  3. It all depends on your PSU. for examaple 80% energy Efficiency PSU multiply that by the Watts from the wall = gives you the total watts used by your CPU, GPU, Fans, etc... so the maximum power reading from the "wall" for a 1000W with 80% Efficiency is 1250W. Let me know if that answer your question :D
  4. uh 80x717 is over 57000...that makes no sense
  5. jeremy1183 said:
    uh 80x717 is over 57000...that makes no sense



    Did you fail at 5th grade math?


    When you convert 80% to numbers it would be .80 so 717*.80 = 573.6
  6. if its 717w inside psu then its / 0.80 = 896.25w wall
  7. Your power reading at the wall will always be highest. Next you move into DC power output by the power supply, that is (power at the wall)/(efficiency)=DC power output.

    The power consumption of everything else in your system at that time added together will sum up to the DC power output.


    Remember to convert the efficiency percentage into a decimal or remember to divide by 100 at the end.
  8. Randomacts said:
    Did you fail at 5th grade math?


    When you convert 80% to numbers it would be .80 so 717*.80 = 573.6



    baahahaha I read the post wrong....feel like an idiot now...thanks for the wake up...im actually good at match...use it every day in the job i do....
  9. To be completely clear:

    If the entire computer is using 100Watts and the PSU (at 100Watts) is 80% efficient this means:

    - Wall power is 100Watts
    - PSU uses 20Watts
    - rest of computer uses 80Watts

    Sometimes you'll see it written that a graphics card uses "150Watts"; usually that is what the card uses itself. However, because the PSU also has to use energy to supply that power, you in fact use more than 150Watts.

    "Wall Power" is the energy that the entire computer is using and what you will be paying for on your electric bill.
  10. jeremy1183 said:
    is it higher or lower anywhere else in the system?


    The power consumed by the PC can never exceed the wall "load" power from the grid. As other's noted the AC power from the grid is converted to DC power for use by the PC components.
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