Workstation vs desktop CPUs

Hi, I was wondering, what's the difference between desktop and workstation CPUs. Is there any difference in performance per clock (if both are the same architecture)? And what justifies the high price?
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  1. We don’t make any difference between a desktop processor and a workstation processor. Now there is a difference between a desktop and server processor. In most cases a server processor like an Intel® Xeon® will support both ECC memory and also work in a multiple processor configuration. While a normal Intel Core™ i7 processor would not be able to do these 2 things.

    Christian Wood
    Intel Enthusiast Team
  2. Yeah, I meant Xeons. And what justifies the high price?
  3. I think the higher price is mainly due to the features that *IntelEnthusiast* mentioned. Xeon processor are business grade, can be run along side other processors and support ECC memory which is essential for businesses. They are probably built to higher standard also, similar to ECC ram where they are most likley tested more rigorously.

    The other reason is probably, because they are marketed for the businesses which have money and are willing to purchase this which equates to more profit.

    I could be wrong, but thats my $0.02 :)
  4. julius 85 said:
    Yeah, I meant Xeons. And what justifies the high price?



    :sol: :hello: hi, this might be helpful to u, if u render a HD 1080p movie or any HD 3d content on normal cpu or costly Core processors with high end GPU it will take hours & u r PC runs dead slow, but if u render a HD movie with XEON processors on workstation/Server PC in production stage whole process will take several minutes to two or three hours depending on the content, and That rig will not slow down,if u say in twitter style Xeon for Performance,Production & Core for Multipurpose.(gaming,Office & home use)

    Quote:
    :non: Never Run normal apps on Xeon processors these are meant for heavy works :non:
  5. julius 85 said:
    Yeah, I meant Xeons. And what justifies the high price?


    The fact that people still buy them at the high price justifies the high price. Xeons by and large sell to businesses, and businesses aren't nearly as cost-sensitive with server equipment as you or I are with our equipment. Paying an extra thousand bucks for Xeons over the cost of comparable Core i7s or AMD processors is a big deal to us, not so much for businesses, especially large businesses.

    Anonymous said:
    I think the higher price is mainly due to the features that *IntelEnthusiast* mentioned. Xeon processor are business grade, can be run along side other processors and support ECC memory which is essential for businesses. They are probably built to higher standard also, similar to ECC ram where they are most likley tested more rigorously.


    ECC RAM is more expensive because it contains an extra memory module per rank (9 vs. 8) as well as sells a lot fewer units than non-ECC RAM. A product with a smaller market largely made up of people willing to spend more money (businesses) supports higher prices. Unbuffered ECC RAM is about a third more expensive than standard unbuffered non-ECC desktop RAM, and the only-for-servers registered ECC RAM runs about twice as much as unbuffered non-ECC desktop RAM. Again, that's because the only units using registered RAM today are servers that run a lot of RAM and cost 10-300 times as much as your average desktop computer.. Those are bought by companies with deep pockets that accept the high cost in order to get the products they want.

    There are different tiers of testing performed, and testing on quality non-ECC desktop stuff and ECC server stuff is supposedly similar. Where the difference lies is that there isn't much lower-grade ECC RAM on the market, but there is for desktop. All of the server stuff I've seen is fully tested branded parts, while there are also unbranded but fully tested parts (ETT), unbranded untested but presumed working parts (ETT) and subpar parts (downgraded) for desktop/laptop RAM modules. See here for more details on that.
  6. MU_Engineer said:
    The fact that people still buy them at the high price justifies the high price. Xeons by and large sell to businesses, and businesses aren't nearly as cost-sensitive with server equipment as you or I are with our equipment. Paying an extra thousand bucks for Xeons over the cost of comparable Core i7s or AMD processors is a big deal to us, not so much for businesses, especially large businesses.


    ECC RAM is more expensive because it contains an extra memory module per rank (9 vs. 8) as well as sells a lot fewer units than non-ECC RAM. A product with a smaller market largely made up of people willing to spend more money (businesses) supports higher prices. Unbuffered ECC RAM is about a third more expensive than standard unbuffered non-ECC desktop RAM, and the only-for-servers registered ECC RAM runs about twice as much as unbuffered non-ECC desktop RAM. Again, that's because the only units using registered RAM today are servers that run a lot of RAM and cost 10-300 times as much as your average desktop computer.. Those are bought by companies with deep pockets that accept the high cost in order to get the products they want.

    There are different tiers of testing performed, and testing on quality non-ECC desktop stuff and ECC server stuff is supposedly similar. Where the difference lies is that there isn't much lower-grade ECC RAM on the market, but there is for desktop. All of the server stuff I've seen is fully tested branded parts, while there are also unbranded but fully tested parts (ETT), unbranded untested but presumed working parts (ETT) and subpar parts (downgraded) for desktop/laptop RAM modules. See here for more details on that.

    :sol: :sol: :pt1cable: crystal clear picture about xeons Ur a genius man :love:
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