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Quick & Easy Suggestion, please, for RAM on new build

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May 14, 2012 8:54:40 PM

Hi there, gentlemen,

This was my first build, and the whole thing went surprisingly smoothly. All for video editing with Adobe Master Collection 5.5. But the RAM, (Crucial Ballistix sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model BLS2KIT4G3D1609DS1S00) X2, for total of 16GB) has given me enough of a fit that I've already secured a Refund RMA # from Newegg.

So, I'm up in the air as to what to try next. Still would like to have at least 16GB (machine can handle 32GB, but do you think I would have better luck with 2 sticks, instead of 4?). Price, at this point, is secondary. I just want something that you have found works flawlessly.

I'd appreciate your suggestions, and I'm ready to make a new purchase as we speak.

Thank you,
Ken

May 14, 2012 9:01:02 PM

kenkyle said:
Hi there, gentlemen,

This was my first build, and the whole thing went surprisingly smoothly. All for video editing with Adobe Master Collection 5.5. But the RAM, (Crucial Ballistix sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model BLS2KIT4G3D1609DS1S00) X2, for total of 16GB) has given me enough of a fit that I've already secured a Refund RMA # from Newegg.

So, I'm up in the air as to what to try next. Still would like to have at least 16GB (machine can handle 32GB, but do you think I would have better luck with 2 sticks, instead of 4?). Price, at this point, is secondary. I just want something that you have found works flawlessly.

I'd appreciate your suggestions, and I'm ready to make a new purchase as we speak.

Thank you,
Ken


Here's my specs: Intel 2600K; Z68 Asus PRO/GEN3 MOBO; 750W Corsair PSU; GTX 570 GPU; Crucial 128GB SSD, plus storage harddrive.
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a b } Memory
May 14, 2012 9:14:17 PM

Hello,

Well since we have similar motherboards (similar in a loose term) in that they are both Z68 and Asus - my mushkin 2x8 GB sticks work fine for my system.

And are you sure it was your RAM giving you issues?

Mushkin Enhanced Silverline 2x8 GB sticks $98.99:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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May 14, 2012 10:12:19 PM

'And are you sure it was your RAM giving you issues?'

RAM, as opposed to what? or what else?

Thanks for your reply, Chainzsaw. Appreciate the advice.
--Ken
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a c 106 } Memory
May 14, 2012 11:16:17 PM

For video editing, I understand that it is a 64 bit app that can use lots of ram to speed things up.
I suggest a 16gb kit of 2 x 8gb. If you want 32gb, then look at a 32gb kit, but you will need windows 7 pro or higher to access more than 16gb.

Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards can be very sensitive to this.
Although, I think the problem has lessened with the newer Intel chipsets. Still,
it is safer to get what you need in one kit.

You want documented ram compatibility. If you should ever have a problem, you want supported ram.
Otherwise, you risk a finger pointing battle between the ram and motherboard support sites, claiming "not my problem".
One place to check is your motherboards web site.
Look for the ram QVL list. It lists all of the ram kits that have been tested with that particular motherboard.
Sometimes the QVL list is not updated after the motherboard is released.
For more current info, go to a ram vendor's web site and access their ram selection configurator.
Enter your motherboard, and you will get a list of compatible ram kits.
While today's motherboards are more tolerant of different ram, it makes sense to buy ram that is known to work and is supported.

The current Intel nehalem and sandy bridge cpu's have an excellent integrated ram controller. It is able to keep the cpu fed with data from any speed ram.
The difference in real application performance or FPS between the fastest and slowest ram is on the order of 1-3%.

Synthetic benchmark differences will be impressive, but are largely irrelevant in the real world.

Fancy heat spreaders are mostly marketing too.

Only if you are seeking record level overclocks should you consider faster ram or better latencies.
Read this Anandtech article on memory scaling:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/4503/sandy-bridge-memory-...
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May 17, 2012 7:56:57 PM

Geofelt,

Thank you for the thorough reply. I enjoyed it, and it was quite informative.

I did some isolating-and-replacing memory sticks. I finally concluded that my problem was a bad memory slot. So, I returned the MOBO for replacement.

Meanwhile, I had already got an RMA# from Newegg for my 4 sticks of 4GB each. Thinking I would need new RAM, I ordered 2 sticks of 8GB each, which should arrive in another day or two.

At this point, I can either return the 4 sticks, or not. If they're good, and from my testing, I think they are, I am tempted to keep them. So now, my question is: Can I install the 2 sticks of 8GB each and then supplement those with, say, two sticks of 4GB each?

Adobe, as you know, can never have too much RAM, and I'm running Windows 7 Ultimate, so it should handle 24GB.

Finally, allow me ask about the Dual Channel aspect. I was taught that if I have two dark blue slots and two light blue slots, and I'm running only two sticks of RAM, that in order to have memory run at the Dual Channel capability, I should insert the two sticks into the same colored slots.

If that is so, and if I have an aftermarket cooler that blocks the *1 slot (dark blue), will I still have Dual Channel if I insert two sticks in the light blues?

Thank you, also, 2FAST, KELTHIC, and CHAINZSAW for your replies, as well.

--Ken

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a c 106 } Memory
May 17, 2012 9:01:45 PM

I think there is not a standard, but to get two channel operation, you usually install two sticks in like colored slots. Chech your motherboard manual.

Some motherboards require you to use certain slots if you have only sticks. Mostly, it does not matter. Again, check your motherboard manual.

If you have uneven sticks sizes, you want to install the same amount of gb in each channel. Otherwise the odd size will operate in single channel mode.

Yes, you could supplement the sticks, and it most likely will work.

But, why not follow through with the rma of the 4 sticks and buy another matching 2 x 8gb pair so you have 32gb. Ultimate will support 196gb, I think.
With your Adobe app, that will be as good as you can get.

Sometimes, you can install a cooler and slip the fan up a bit higher to clear tall ram spreaders.

Sometimes, you can remove part of tall heat spreaders with no adverse impact.

At this point, why not get a 32gb kit of low profile ram and be done with it?
Newegg is very accomodating to good customers.
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May 19, 2012 11:33:14 PM

Hi, again, Geofelt,

Thanks again for your informative reply. It explained a lot. I like your last suggestion the best.

I received the 2 sticks of 8GB each, and Man!, those spreaders are huge. Also I test-fitted the Hyper 212, and it looks like no way the first slot of RAM (with those spreaders) is going to clear the fan.

I looked on Newegg while RAM shopping, and I looked for "low profile" in the descriptions, but found none. Is it just a matter of buying sticks without spreaders, or are there actual RAM kits that are advertised as low profile?

Got my MOBO too, and I'm ready to begin the assembly process tonight or tomorrow. Once everything is together, I'll be able to finalize my plans. Like you say, it would be nice to have the 32GB, since I've got about that much money wrapped into it all at this point anyway.

Take care, buddy,
--Ken

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May 28, 2012 4:23:07 AM

Best answer selected by kenkyle.
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a c 146 } Memory
May 28, 2012 8:11:44 AM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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