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Can't get my Patriot 1600 to run at 1600! Help!

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May 17, 2012 6:27:45 PM

I currently am running Patriot Gamer 2 Series Division 2 Edition DDR3 4x2 GB PC3-12800 Ram in my new desktop. For a while it was running at 1333 MHz but I just recently got it to run at 1400 MHz at 1.65v. How do I get this thing to run 1600 or higher?

-i5-3570k at 4.3 GHz
-GTX 560 Ti OC a little
-ASROCK Pro4-m Motherboard
-Seagate 1TB HDD
-600w PSU

More about : patriot 1600 run 1600

a b } Memory
May 17, 2012 6:41:20 PM

Activate xmp inside of your bios
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a c 150 } Memory
May 17, 2012 7:38:43 PM

You should be running 1.5v RAM. If turning on XMP ( Extreme memory profile ) does not work then set it manually in BIOS. 1.65v RAM is dangerous at least to Sandy Bridge CPUs so I assume to Ivy Bridge as well especially since they hate high voltage when overclocking so much. These chips have an integrated memory controller on the CPU. It's no longer on the motherboard like in past generations.
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May 20, 2012 4:27:05 AM

anort3 said:
You should be running 1.5v RAM. If turning on XMP ( Extreme memory profile ) does not work then set it manually in BIOS. 1.65v RAM is dangerous at least to Sandy Bridge CPUs so I assume to Ivy Bridge as well especially since they hate high voltage when overclocking so much. These chips have an integrated memory controller on the CPU. It's no longer on the motherboard like in past generations.


Well it turns out the ram was just faulty. However I must ask, what voltage should 1067, 1333, and 1600 ram run at?


Also on a completely different note, if I overclock my GTX 560 Ti to around 2300 MHz Shader Clock, and 2469 MHz Video RAM, what voltage should I use?
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a c 150 } Memory
May 20, 2012 5:17:52 AM

Any RAM used in a Sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge build should be 1.5v no matter the speed. These chips have the memory controller on the CPU and going over 1.5v voids the CPU warranty and can cause instability and actually damage the chip.

I would not use DDR3 1066 as you will take a performace hit. Good DDR3 1333 will be cas 7 and good DDR3 1600 will be cas 9. 1.5v DDR3 1600 cas 9 is considered the sweet spot.

I have no idea what voltage to use for a GTX 560 Ti but in general it's a bad idea to increase voltage on a GPU very much at all. I would go with whatever clocks you can get on stock voltage. Overclocking the VRAM much like system RAM yields very few gains compared to overclocking the core clock. So if you are unstable turn down the memory clock and go for the highest core you can get.
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May 20, 2012 5:44:11 AM

Best answer selected by CaptainTom.
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a c 146 } Memory
May 20, 2012 7:01:16 AM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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