Latest AMD Processor

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latest AMD processor and its price comparing to latest pentium processor and its performance
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More about latest processor
  1. Thehe processor (also called CPU, short for Central Processing Unit) is the "engine" of a computer. It is the most important component in determining how fast or 'snappy' the system will operate across applications both now and in the near future. Like the engine of an automobile, a processor can be fast, slow, power hungry or power efficient subject to the kind of work the computer is being considered for. It is important to round out what kind of things you will be doing on the system to best select a computer with a CPU most suitable to your needs.

    Unlike other components of a notebook computer, the CPU is -- with rare exception -- a fixed component. This is in contrast to RAM and hard disk storage which can typically be upgraded. Therefore, another consideration is the fact that (important as the CPU is) the CPU you choose will be the same throughout the life of the system. This implies that as programs become more sophisticated, the computer's ability to handle such programs will be directly affected by the decision made at purchase all that time ago. This choice may mean the difference between a system that is useful for another year or two versus one that isn't -- much sooner. As a final consideration in choosing a CPU is the suggested or minimum requirements of either the programs that is planning on being run, or academic department recommendations as a guide as to the relative kind of performance required for a particular field of study.Let's take example as Intel Core i7 As Intel's flagship processor, the i7 is a 64-bit processor offering either 2, 4, or 6 cores of the highest levels of general performance available. The i7 combines Hyper Threading and Turbo Boost technologies for the most demanding and advanced of applications. Then, AMD Phenom II X6 AMD's Phenom II X6 represents the industry's first consumer class six-core processor. The X6 offers the highest levels of performance ideal for the most intensive of tasks - bolstered by AMD's new Turbo Core technology, the X6 is able to optimize performance in a variety of situations. But Intel Core i7 is slightly expansive than AMD but its performance is greater than it.
  2. you can find all this information, its everywhere, just use google, or read through toms "best CPU for the money" article
  3. All this talk about Intel better/faster than AMD is, I think all to do about nothing. The strength of AMD these days is that they offer performance on one high performance platform from cpu, gpu and chipset. This used to be Intel's domain, but of course to reach levels of AMD performance you must currently mesh the Intel CPU with either an AMD or Nvidia GPU.

    I have reminded folks about this now in several posts I have made. That senario can have a some drawbacks as Intel is not always forward about sharing it's designs with third party manufacturers and has lead to some horrible outcomes with folks who have chosen non-Intel chipsets on their mobos in the past. So care must be taken that quality components are selected. It's largely why Intel mobos tend to be considerably more expensive than those produced for AMD.

    The products from AMD are now a platform, not just singular discrete parts as in the past. They are becoming evermore integrated and we are now seeing the first parts from both AMD and Nvidia that will no longer work in an Intel systems, simply because they are not designed for them. This is why I think AMD are so keen to go down the APU line and Nvidia with CUDA as this will inevertably take powerful discrete GPU's off the market after these products hit high end specifications of course. They will of course with further refinement of the architecture from source to output being dramatically shortened.

    Of course these APU's can not be used on Intel based mobo's??? I hope therefore that Intel are working feverishly on a high end graphics solution because I think they are gonna need it sooner than later. The real problem is not the margins between AMD & Intel CPU's as between their respective GPU's, because as I have stated in the past, Phenom will do everything that Sandy Bridge can if a tad slower, but Intel IGP will fall over if high end DX tasks are thrown at it and if it can manage it at all the performance levels are, shall we say, "pukeable."
  4. The question seems to assume "Pentium" is still the name of Intel's latest/greatest CPUs, which is not/has not been the case for several years....
  5. razor 10 said:
    Thehe processor (also called CPU, short for Central Processing Unit) is the "engine" of a computer. It is the most important component in determining how fast or 'snappy' the system will operate across applications both now and in the near future. Like the engine of an automobile, a processor can be fast, slow, power hungry or power efficient subject to the kind of work the computer is being considered for. It is important to round out what kind of things you will be doing on the system to best select a computer with a CPU most suitable to your needs.

    Unlike other components of a notebook computer, the CPU is -- with rare exception -- a fixed component. This is in contrast to RAM and hard disk storage which can typically be upgraded. Therefore, another consideration is the fact that (important as the CPU is) the CPU you choose will be the same throughout the life of the system. This implies that as programs become more sophisticated, the computer's ability to handle such programs will be directly affected by the decision made at purchase all that time ago. This choice may mean the difference between a system that is useful for another year or two versus one that isn't -- much sooner. As a final consideration in choosing a CPU is the suggested or minimum requirements of either the programs that is planning on being run, or academic department recommendations as a guide as to the relative kind of performance required for a particular field of study.Let's take example as Intel Core i7 As Intel's flagship processor, the i7 is a 64-bit processor offering either 2, 4, or 6 cores of the highest levels of general performance available. The i7 combines Hyper Threading and Turbo Boost technologies for the most demanding and advanced of applications. Then, AMD Phenom II X6 AMD's Phenom II X6 represents the industry's first consumer class six-core processor. The X6 offers the highest levels of performance ideal for the most intensive of tasks - bolstered by AMD's new Turbo Core technology, the X6 is able to optimize performance in a variety of situations. But Intel Core i7 is slightly expansive than AMD but its performance is greater than it.

    you forgot to mention bulldozer which is a new revolution in AMD history
  6. harna said:
    All this talk about Intel better/faster than AMD is, I think all to do about nothing. The strength of AMD these days is that they offer performance on one high performance platform from cpu, gpu and chipset. This used to be Intel's domain, but of course to reach levels of AMD performance you must currently mesh the Intel CPU with either an AMD or Nvidia GPU.

    I have reminded folks about this now in several posts I have made. That senario can have a some drawbacks as Intel is not always forward about sharing it's designs with third party manufacturers and has lead to some horrible outcomes with folks who have chosen non-Intel chipsets on their mobos in the past. So care must be taken that quality components are selected. It's largely why Intel mobos tend to be considerably more expensive than those produced for AMD.

    The products from AMD are now a platform, not just singular discrete parts as in the past. They are becoming evermore integrated and we are now seeing the first parts from both AMD and Nvidia that will no longer work in an Intel systems, simply because they are not designed for them. This is why I think AMD are so keen to go down the APU line and Nvidia with CUDA as this will inevertably take powerful discrete GPU's off the market after these products hit high end specifications of course. They will of course with further refinement of the architecture from source to output being dramatically shortened.

    Of course these APU's can not be used on Intel based mobo's??? I hope therefore that Intel are working feverishly on a high end graphics solution because I think they are gonna need it sooner than later. The real problem is not the margins between AMD & Intel CPU's as between their respective GPU's, because as I have stated in the past, Phenom will do everything that Sandy Bridge can if a tad slower, but Intel IGP will fall over if high end DX tasks are thrown at it and if it can manage it at all the performance levels are, shall we say, "pukeable."

    Simply the APU is an intel shocker
  7. ^APU is an intel chocker? huh.....they just stuck a graphics chip on the CPU instead of the motherboard.....SHOCKING! Intel do that also. Seriously, your average joe hasn't even heard of AMD before, let alone an APU, even if Bulldozer is something really special intel will remain the dominant force in the market as they are a common household name. What AMD need is a proper advertising campaign backed up by a good product. I dont think i've ever seen an AMD add on TV here in Australia, and because of this they remain second fiddle to Intel because average joe doesnt know who they are.
  8. ..that's all well and good, but of course AMD does not have a hope in Hades of supplying the world with BD hardware, as their manufacturing base is just way too small, even if Intel fell over tomorrow there would be a lot of us going around without pc's. That might have something to do with the lack of push from AMD. Their modus opparandi is to build slowly and reliably over time. Their products are hitting the spot and do enough to sell themselves purely on price if nothing else. Intel's job is to try and stop AMD going from adequate alternative to glamour model.....but it's too late I fear as BD is going to change the landscape to a point that will be unrecognisable in the next five years.

    .....just stuck graphics on EH???.....nay, nay they integrated a DX11 part on to the heart of the pc and that GPU will no longer run on an Intel mobo because it's merged with the CPU...hence an APU....APU's don't not run on Intel mobo's, and because the GPU is in the heart it will inevertably exceed the performance of dicrete GPU's and as they will no longer be required to be manufactured other than for Crossfire purposes...or maybe that might not even be necessary..........now remember that Nvidia wants to head in the same direction as AMD......

    ...and so now the question is what is Intel planing for that event horizon??????
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