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Athlon II X4 big difference to Phenom II X6?

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September 3, 2011 4:51:56 AM

Hello. In winter of 2010-2011, my trusty old AMD Athlon 64 X2 5200+ CPU started to overheat (temps would soar to the high 60s during idle), not to mention that my hard drive was making clicking noises. After having to cope with an increasing amount of blue screens, system freezes, os corruption, slowdowns, etc. for over six months, there came a week finally in July 2011 when my computer would blue screen 15 minutes after windows startup (on idle). Since this computer was already 4 years old, I decided to buy a new system. My budget was around $500, because I use the computer for mainly watching videos, office productivity (word, excel, etc), and some mild gaming (FS2004). Since my old computer had basically became useless, I needed a system quick. I zoned in on Futureshops HP Pavillion P7-1010 desktop, which had an AMD Athlon II X4 645 (3.1 GHz) processor, 6GB of DDR3-1333 RAM, and a fairly decent HD4200 IGP. Since the reviews were good, and it had a decent processor and ample amounts of fast RAM, I decided to buy it for $499, which I considered a good deal. The next computer up at the time had a AMD Phenom II X6 1065T processor and 8GB of RAM, which I considered not worth it at the hefty price of $649.

So now, my predicament is that, low and behold, the Labour Day sales came along, and the HP Pavillion P7-1044 comes on sale for the same price as the P7-1010 I purchased ($499). It has the exact same specs as my computer (6GB RAM, HD4200), with the exception of sporting an AMD Phenom II X6 1065T. So now, I am feeling a little bit of buyers remorse, considering that I could have gotten a six-core at the same price as my quad-core. However, at that time, I was in desprate need of a computer, as my old one had completely broken down. So, can anyone please tell me if I missed out on much?

How does the performance of the AMD Athlon II X4 645 (3.1 GHz, 4x512KB L2, no L3), compare to the AMD Phenom II X6 1065T (2.9 GHz-3.4 GHz turbo, 6x512KB L2, 6 MB L3)? Did I miss out on much, considering that I don't do video encoding/3d rendering, intense high-def gaming, or anything that would require high-CPU power (well, maybe unizipping RAR archives once in a while). Please help, because I am annoyed at myself for not waiting and getting the six-core processor. How much, in terms of real-world performance (not benchmarks) did I lose? Is there a really big difference in my situation? (light gaming, Office, programming with Visual Studio, etc.) Thanks!
a c 93 à CPUs
September 3, 2011 5:00:22 AM

The extra CPU cores aren't going to do you any good for the applications you use. Anything above 4 cores really isn't useful unless you are into video encoding, 3D rendering, photoshop, etc. Even gaming doesn't use more than 4 cores. Unzipping RAR archives, office applications and watching videos only use a single core and aren't that intensive. Just stick with what you have, it's perfectly fine for your needs.
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a c 82 à CPUs
September 3, 2011 10:19:47 AM

for what you do, a 6 core cpu would be a waste. Something you should look into, is the phenom x4, it has more cache and is faster per core than the athlon, better for gaming. 6 cores are currently useless for gaming.
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a c 83 à CPUs
September 3, 2011 11:03:49 AM

I would like to point out that its not the same price. When you were buying, it was more expensive. Computers are always getting cheaper and faster. If you wait long enough, you can buy a 16core 192GB ram system for $350. You'll be waiting a long time however. (Time = money, so they aren't the same price)

For what you do the 6 core isn't worth it. If you want to spend $$$, get a better PSU and a video card. Don't go buying a CPU you don't need.
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September 3, 2011 2:31:29 PM

Thanks guys! Since I don't multitask (except perhaps office and some IE windows, there doesnt seem to be any use for the six core is there? My CPU basically sits at 0% for most of the time anyway xD
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a c 83 à CPUs
September 3, 2011 4:00:54 PM

Correct, which means it's pointless to spend $500 just to get two extra cores you won't use. You're not missing out on anything, save your $$$ for the next thing you need.
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a c 108 à CPUs
September 5, 2011 12:05:15 AM

The x6 rig may be worth the price difference when you decide to dispose of the system (or salvage parts for a new AM3+ custom build)

...

otherwise - don't worry about it

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October 4, 2011 8:14:04 PM

Although this was not the original question posed I was wondering if I might ask an offshoot question which particurally pertains to me. I would really appreciate any answers/comments you guys could give me.

I have the exact same system as gert- the HP p7-1010 albeit the addition of a Visiontek ATI Radeon HD 5450 1GB DDR3 video card (which has worked quite well for the most part). I also have thought about upgrading the processor from an Athlon II x4 645 to the Phenom II x4 965 Black Edition processor and still wish to do this. My main concerns are simply whether

1) Is my N-Alvorix-RS880-uATX Motherboard sufficient to simply upgrade the CPU or do I need/want to upgrade the Motherboard as well?
A) If it will work will the Phenom II be restricted or held back in any of its capabilities by a less than optimal motherboard?
B) As I believe someone previously stated- the TDP for my current motherboard is 95W while the processor upgrade is rated for 125W, does this matter?

2) Is there anything else I should be aware of with respect to my current plan or a related subject?

I would really appreciate any feedback that you guys could give me and I apologize for any and all ignorance In my post.

Thanks
CWA
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a b à CPUs
October 5, 2011 11:50:22 AM

Andrew,

Upgrading CPUs in an OEM (like HP) motherboard is chancy at best, and overclocking (a significant advantage of the BE Phenom) will never be an option.

Also, please start your own thread (with the same info as above) even for a similar question, you have a better chance of getting a helpful response.
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October 12, 2011 1:15:04 AM

Andrewcw57 said:
Although this was not the original question posed I was wondering if I might ask an offshoot question which particurally pertains to me. I would really appreciate any answers/comments you guys could give me.

I have the exact same system as gert- the HP p7-1010 albeit the addition of a Visiontek ATI Radeon HD 5450 1GB DDR3 video card (which has worked quite well for the most part). I also have thought about upgrading the processor from an Athlon II x4 645 to the Phenom II x4 965 Black Edition processor and still wish to do this. My main concerns are simply whether

1) Is my N-Alvorix-RS880-uATX Motherboard sufficient to simply upgrade the CPU or do I need/want to upgrade the Motherboard as well?
A) If it will work will the Phenom II be restricted or held back in any of its capabilities by a less than optimal motherboard?
B) As I believe someone previously stated- the TDP for my current motherboard is 95W while the processor upgrade is rated for 125W, does this matter?

2) Is there anything else I should be aware of with respect to my current plan or a related subject?

I would really appreciate any feedback that you guys could give me and I apologize for any and all ignorance In my post.

Thanks
CWA


You got a ATI HD 5450 to run on the 250 Watt power supply that the P7-1010 has? You're treading on thin ice...be careful or one day, you might just wake up to the smell of a burning GPU. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think ANY video cards can run on a 250-watt power supply (thats why I'm still using the onboard HD4200...next discrete card that can run on 300 watts is the gt210, and in my benchmarks, they perform almost the same, so waste of money to upgrade).
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October 12, 2011 1:22:53 AM

Also, as an answer to 1 b) its does matter, because if you go over the TDP on the CPU, the power supply might not be able to deliever enough juice to keep it running smoothly. I think the best CPU you can install that is 95W is the AMD Phenom II X6 10xxT Six-Core series, which is pretty good. Just pay close attention to the TDP and make sure its 95W or under when you buy and you should be ok. Might need a BIOS upgrade, but otherwise fine.
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a c 83 à CPUs
October 12, 2011 1:23:03 AM

No. The 5450 and GT210 use very little power. Less then 20 or so watts under load. You both should be fine. I wouldn't run any of the x670s as they call for around 50-60W, and can overwhelm a 250W.
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October 13, 2011 10:47:50 PM

Thanks a lot for all of the responses, I appreciate it. I only wish I had tempered my impatience and built my current desktop rather than buying a low grade model. Oh well, I will know better for the next time.

CWA
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November 11, 2011 9:08:49 PM

Best answer selected by gert21445.
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a c 141 à CPUs
November 11, 2011 11:08:28 PM

5760 works fine on a 250w psu as long as the quality is there. Max draw is about 180w for the system.
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a c 83 à CPUs
November 12, 2011 12:08:17 AM

First random 250W PSU from newegg, 180W total power on 12v rail.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Second, 192W.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Third, 156.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

None of these 250W PSU inspire me with the confidence that they can power anything close to a 5670 or 6670. (or even the 4670 for that matter.) There is one 250W by sparkle that might be able to, but at $55 you are better off just buying a better PSU. Sad/sorry to say but a 250W PSU is junk, and the less you ask of it the better.
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