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2.1 speakers vs digital audio output on onboard realtek card

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September 3, 2011 5:54:00 AM

I have 2.1 sound system with 2 satellite speakers and a subwoofer with built in amplifier.my sound card is realtek ALC888 and is onboard a intel dg31pr mobo.I dont hear sound from realtek digital output when set it as default device and test it.
Are my speakers not compatiable or it is a sound card problem. Please help...
September 3, 2011 4:39:08 PM

...... ur speakers dont have digital input -.-
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September 4, 2011 2:13:49 AM

Can you please explain.what do u mean there is no digital input when i have a realtek hd audio card
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September 4, 2011 4:48:54 PM

i said ur SPEAKERS not ur realtek sound chip.... it doesnt have a digital input... simple as....

anyway why would you want a digital connection??? analogue is best.
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September 5, 2011 1:17:22 AM

MEgamer said:
i said ur SPEAKERS not ur realtek sound chip.... it doesnt have a digital input... simple as....

anyway why would you want a digital connection??? analogue is best.


While it does indeed sound like the OP does not have a digital input on his speakers I'm curious as to why you think analogue is better. I've always been under the impression that digital connections are cleaner nearly eliminating noise whereas with a good soundcard you can get clean audio but not as clean as a digital connection.

Can you clarify?
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September 5, 2011 1:19:36 AM

U mean there is no diffrence b/w digital and analog.what type of speakers do u need for digital INPUT.
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September 5, 2011 11:02:51 AM

halcyon said:
While it does indeed sound like the OP does not have a digital input on his speakers I'm curious as to why you think analogue is better. I've always been under the impression that digital connections are cleaner nearly eliminating noise whereas with a good soundcard you can get clean audio but not as clean as a digital connection.

Can you clarify?



noise isn't a problem when you get into mid-high end gear... its accuracy.
digital connection is only a way to pass signals. the problem is with digital is jitters and thers no way around it, different digital devices get jitters in different forms of another, this is why analogue is still best (because tthe problems taht may occur can be eliminated). when you pass on a digital signals, it has to be converted back again to analogue. the actual source of any signals, is actaully the electrical connection made by the plug... electricity is a wave.

in the real world of audio (currecntly) only analogue cables are used, say in live performances and studio recording. some people may use digital devices and conncetions, but most people prefer to keep the path clean, where most inaccuracy and interference is made is in the DAC and the ADC.
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September 5, 2011 11:08:11 AM

karanpal singh said:
U mean there is no diffrence b/w digital and analog.what type of speakers do u need for digital INPUT.


speakers with built in DAC. but DAC in soundcards are better, and even onboard, but with speakers with their own DAC tend to have other technologies. like the z-5500. the z-10 also has a DAC, but that connection is made through the USB. and thats the only speakers i can think of right now.....


stick with analogue.
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September 5, 2011 11:51:50 AM

MEgamer said:
noise isn't a problem when you get into mid-high end gear... its accuracy.
digital connection is only a way to pass signals. the problem is with digital is jitters and thers no way around it, different digital devices get jitters in different forms of another, this is why analogue is still best (because tthe problems taht may occur can be eliminated). when you pass on a digital signals, it has to be converted back again to analogue. the actual source of any signals, is actaully the electrical connection made by the plug... electricity is a wave.

in the real world of audio (currecntly) only analogue cables are used, say in live performances and studio recording. some people may use digital devices and conncetions, but most people prefer to keep the path clean, where most inaccuracy and interference is made is in the DAC and the ADC.


I'd come to believe that jitter was really a thing of the past with early low-quality converters. ...didn't think it was still a relevant problem with today's mid-to-high-end gear.
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September 6, 2011 2:21:07 PM

What is DAC? I thought amplifier was enough for digital sound.i was wrong.
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Best solution

September 6, 2011 3:33:32 PM

Ok people, rewind a few steps here.

Sound is a wave, which can only be represented as an analog signal. What that means is at some point, a digital audio file will need to be converted back to analog. Even digital speakers output audio via analog, they just handle the conversion internally. Normally, some other device [soundcard, receiver, etc] handles the conversion from digital to analog, using the devices Digital to Analog Converter [DAC].

As such, your maximum possible audio quality can not be higher then the quality of the DAC used to convert digital audio to analog. And in most cases, soundcards have a better DAC then speakers [and even most receivers these days]. Hence why I tend to recommend sticking to analog outputs whenever possible.

The one advantage Digital gives, is assuming the source output is clean, you should get no background distortions in the signal. But as mentioned, Jitter remains a problem, and several digital output standards [*cough*spdif*cough*] have significant limitations on what signals can be transferred over.

---------------------------------

Questions like these will be answered in my audio guide, which actually exists now; only two sections to go [though I suspect I'll re-write most of it at some point...]. Plan to have it out this week or next week...[I mean it this time!]
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September 8, 2011 3:59:34 AM

Best answer selected by karanpal singh.
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