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Best ram ?

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May 23, 2012 1:43:10 AM

Looking to buy 8gb (2x4gb) ram, but not sure what to choose or if there is a big difference between 1333 and 1600. I want something black or blue for sure. I was looking at http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145345 (corsair vengeance) but it says it is only optimized for Sandy bridge and I have an i5 3570K. Will it still work just as well with the 77x chipsets ? Or is there a better looking/performing choice.


Yes I care about the look of my ram, sue me :ange: 

More about : ram

a b } Memory
May 23, 2012 2:42:32 AM

CT2KIT51264BA1339

There isn't much difference between 1333 and 1600. The biggest difference between RAM is how often sticks show up DOA and for the part number I quoted the chance is near 0.

Crucial and Kingston fail at the lowest rate and Corsair and any fly by night brand is the highest.

RAM isn't really optimized for Sandy Bridge chips. That is just stuff marketing people say to get you to buy their product instead of somebody else's product that is mostly the same.

I use that RAM part number from above (I put my money where my mouth is) and I used it just fine both with an AMD AM3 system and with an Intel i5 Ivy Bridge system. It worked exactly the same both times.

Vanity - I can't really help you with that. People that want looks and don't mind slogging through the RMA process usually like to go with Corsair RAM.
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May 23, 2012 3:24:07 AM

Raiddinn said:
CT2KIT51264BA1339

There isn't much difference between 1333 and 1600. The biggest difference between RAM is how often sticks show up DOA and for the part number I quoted the chance is near 0.

Crucial and Kingston fail at the lowest rate and Corsair and any fly by night brand is the highest.

RAM isn't really optimized for Sandy Bridge chips. That is just stuff marketing people say to get you to buy their product instead of somebody else's product that is mostly the same.

I use that RAM part number from above (I put my money where my mouth is) and I used it just fine both with an AMD AM3 system and with an Intel i5 Ivy Bridge system. It worked exactly the same both times.

Vanity - I can't really help you with that. People that want looks and don't mind slogging through the RMA process usually like to go with Corsair RAM.




but you would say those corsair vengeance would work the exact same using sandy bridge or ivy ? I'll just pick those up if it is, they looked perfect for me minus the fact that it says "optimized for sandy"
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a b } Memory
May 23, 2012 3:34:12 AM

Anything that works one way with sandy works the same way for ivy. There is no need to really even spend any time thinking about that.

If that is all that is standing in your way of getting the Corsairs, just do it. If they don't work, it won't be for that reason you can be certain of that.
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May 23, 2012 4:49:23 AM

Raiddinn said:
Anything that works one way with sandy works the same way for ivy. There is no need to really even spend any time thinking about that.

If that is all that is standing in your way of getting the Corsairs, just do it. If they don't work, it won't be for that reason you can be certain of that.



okay perfect I'll probably grab them since they're on sale for $45 ! :)  thanks
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May 23, 2012 5:04:24 AM

Raiddinn said:
CT2KIT51264BA1339

There isn't much difference between 1333 and 1600. The biggest difference between RAM is how often sticks show up DOA and for the part number I quoted the chance is near 0.

Crucial and Kingston fail at the lowest rate and Corsair and any fly by night brand is the highest.

RAM isn't really optimized for Sandy Bridge chips. That is just stuff marketing people say to get you to buy their product instead of somebody else's product that is mostly the same.

I use that RAM part number from above (I put my money where my mouth is) and I used it just fine both with an AMD AM3 system and with an Intel i5 Ivy Bridge system. It worked exactly the same both times.

Vanity - I can't really help you with that. People that want looks and don't mind slogging through the RMA process usually like to go with Corsair RAM.

So much hate towards Corsair... Can you point out and back up what's exactly wrong with their RAM? Because so far I've seen only favourable reviews and user feedback.
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a c 151 } Memory
May 23, 2012 5:10:37 AM

The only really important thing for Sandy and Ivy Bridge is that the RAM be 1.5v. Also there is a bit of a performance increase when going from DDR3 1333 to DDr3 1600. There is not much gain above that. The chips have the memory controller on the CPU itself and just can't use faster memory. Getting DDR3 1600 is worth the extra few dollars over 1333 though. Very good article on it here.

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-...

One thing to be aware of is that Corsair has high heat spreaders that will get in the way if you have an aftermarket CPU cooler. So if you plan on overclocking get the low profile version of the Corsair Vengance or get any GSkill Ripjaws as they will fit under your cooler.
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a b } Memory
May 23, 2012 2:54:29 PM

sublime2k said:
So much hate towards Corsair... Can you point out and back up what's exactly wrong with their RAM? Because so far I've seen only favourable reviews and user feedback.


Indeed I can. Here you go:

http://www.behardware.com/articles/843-8/components-ret...

Look at RAM on that page, the top 5 RAM sets with the highest failure rates all have Corsair right there next to it.

Now go backwards to page 4. Look at the RAM listings of RAM sets with over 5% DOA rates. How many times on that top 8 list does the Corsair name appear? 5? Why yes it does.

The #1 company on that list no longer makes RAM, so you might as well call it 5 out of 7 instead of 5 out of 8.

With failure rates like these, Corsair also needs to quit the game. They bring nothing to it anyway.

Do you notice that nowhere on either of those pages did the companies Crucial or Kingston get mentioned in a worst of the worst list? If not, look again. Their RAM is just plain higher quality with lower failure rates.

Indeed, pretty much everything Corsair makes has higher failure rates than other companies that make the same products. They aren't the quality leader for any sort of product out of the huge number of parts they make.

More than that, though, it is me that has to fix Corsair's screw ups. When people buy parts for a new computer and it doesn't work, they come in here and ask me to figure out what is wrong with it.

When I see Crucial or Kingston RAM, I am happy because I can pretty much rule out a RAM problem when RAM can be one of the most painful things to deal with.

When I see Corsair, I cringe because I have to spend plenty of time trying to rule out RAM the hard way.

I almost never see any people come in here with Crucial or Kingston RAM in their parts listings. Conversely, a huge percentage of people with problems have Corsair RAM.

Every time anyone ever buys Crucial RAM because I recommended it, like I did in this thread, to address their RAM problem, they don't come back because their computer starts working.

Many times when people don't heed my suggestion and buy Corsair to replace their other RAM, they come back again saying it still doesn't work.

I am here to help people have working computers, so yes I do have something against Corsair that actively stands between me and that.
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a b } Memory
May 23, 2012 5:11:08 PM

The lower the voltage of RAM, the better. So the 1.35v is better than the 1.5v in that respect.

However, the CAS 8 RAM does have slightly more performance than the CAS 9 RAM except that RAM is almost never anybody's bottleneck so extra RAM speed does nothing for most people.
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May 23, 2012 6:53:19 PM

@Raiddinn: Okay, fair enough, it seems you've had some bad experience with Corsair. But I'll take feedback from numerous people over feedback from single person.
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a b } Memory
May 23, 2012 7:44:52 PM

That data in the link is feedback from many more people than whoever you are listening to. It is from a huge online retailer that sells hundreds of every kind of part.

You can listen to whatever 2, 3, 4, 5 or whatever people you want, but they can't begin to compare against 200, 300, 400, or 500+ people per part that are included in the data. Data that isn't coming from me, but instead from an unbiased 3rd party that has nothing to gain by siding with either one of us.
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May 23, 2012 7:52:03 PM

Okay, so XMS has high failure rate, I still don't see Vengeance anywhere on those lists.
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a b } Memory
May 23, 2012 8:06:59 PM

Yeah, because its not a top 20 list.

Not like its an exhaustive list ranking every single set of RAM in existence or anything.

Had the website made the list a little longer, I would bet money that Corsair's name would be all over the next slots too.

I get it though, your RAM didn't arrive DOA nor did your buddy's, so that makes them a great manufacturer.

In a vacuum, I would say sure Corsair is a great manufacturer. Their products work at least 95% of the time and that is pretty good. It is only when you compare them against manufacturers that get it right 99.5% of the time that they start to look sad.
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May 23, 2012 8:29:01 PM

Good point, but still, if you're unlucky to be in that 5%, just RMA it and get a working pair. When they work, they work.
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a b } Memory
May 23, 2012 8:40:40 PM

That is one way to look at it.

Once you have a working set of sticks, regardless of how long it takes to get there, your experience will be about the same.

Building a new computer from scratch may take a few hours, lets call it 4. If some new part shows up DOA and you have to try to diagnose the problem, you could be looking at maybe 8 - 40 hours that you have to spend narrowing down the cause of the problem, going through the RMA motions and all that crap.

If you don't care what you do in that 8 - 40 hours, then sure in the long term that will be a drop in the bucket compared to the rest of your life.

I am not one of those kind of people. I would rather spend 8 hours gaming than 8 hours troubleshooting and RMAing and I would certainly rather spend 40 hours gaming than 40 hours troubleshooting and RMAing.

Because how I use that time matters to me, I just can't afford to take the chance on Corsair stuff.

For that matter, every minute I spend troubleshooting my own stuff is 1 less minute I can spend troubleshooting other people's stuff. Clearly that is what I do with my time since I am here and I am addict level staff and all, so my buying risky parts for myself not only hurts me but it hurts other people too.

The more downtime I have the more downtime others have so its twice the penalty.

If I can pay a couple bucks more and get something that has such a small chance to fail as to be negligible, its a bargain over something with a much higher failure rate.
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a c 151 } Memory
May 23, 2012 9:18:04 PM

Corsair rebrands Hynix, Elpida and Micron. Just like with their power supplies they don't make RAM modules they just rebrand.


Crucial is just the consumer brand of Micron so of course they get the best chips.
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a b } Memory
May 23, 2012 9:44:24 PM

I am aware, yes. The chips that fail major manufacturer standards to be sold under their old brand get auctioned off for pennies on the dollar to other companies who get to try to sift through them and find chips that still work OK.

Every one of those black DRAM modules on a Corsair RAM stick failed somebody's inspection somewhere for some reason.

It makes perfect sense why they would have the high fail rates that they have.
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February 23, 2013 7:36:44 PM

Thanks for the link and input Raiddinn. Even though this tread is a little old, I still found the information to be useful. I was checking for the highest manufacturer DOA rating when I hit this thread. I needed to know which manufacturer to go with after buying bad Patriot memory kit when I return to retail.

I personally can't stand Kingston as they often claim their parts run faster than they actually do (although, I agree that Kingston is very stable regardless of the lower than specified specs). I will however be exchanging the bad Patriot kit for a kit of Crucial memory today based on the numbers provided.
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August 5, 2014 9:24:38 AM

sublime2k said:
Good point, but still, if you're unlucky to be in that 5%, just RMA it and get a working pair. When they work, they work.


If only it were that simple:

A couple of years ago, I had 4 x 2GB XMS3 DDR3 modules from Corsair, they caused file corruption and after sending them all back (they asked to return kit not just the faulty module), I kept receiving faulty replacements. I had to return their replacements twice (that's 3 RMAs) before receiving one that worked for a few months then failed.

After all the frustration, I demanded they replace them with new ones (so I could resell them and get my money back).

They sent me two brand new Dominator DDR3 kits of the same capacity and I sold them on eBay. Funny thing is, immediately after doing so, the buyer contacted me to get an invoice because he needed to RMA a faulty module!!

I switched over to Kingston Hyper-X series and they haven't once caused me any problems.

To sum up, my impression of Corsair is that they are component cancer. Stay away!
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