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Windows 98 Install On Laptop with No CD-Drive?

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 8, 2005 2:13:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

OK, here's the problem. I have a Dell Latitude XPi. It came with only
a 3.5 floppy drive. The 3.5 floppy is built in. I bought it off eBay
and thought I would just swap out the floppy drive for a cd drive, and
then do the install from the cd-drive, but when I got it I found out
the 3.5 was built in (it isn't one of the pull out and replace kind,
it's just a slit in the front case). So, now I'm wondering how the hell
to install an OS. I've decided to use Windows 98 SE and I have the
install kit, Windows 98 and startup diskette.

The hard drive I will be installing this on is brand new, so
obviously I will have to format it. This is what I was thinking:

I bought an external HD case that my new HD will fit in. Put the new
HD in the external case, connect it to my desktop (windows xp home),
format it (FAT32), transfer all the files from the Windows 98 disk to
the HD, put the HD in my laptop and run the 98 setup.

Does this sound like might work?

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated?

Thanks
June 8, 2005 5:24:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

should make two partitions one big one small copy all 98 files to the
smaller partition. Boot with a 98 disk login on
to the 98 partition and install. This way if 98 corrupts you can reinstall
it from the second partition.

<RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1118207614.779291.217260@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>
> OK, here's the problem. I have a Dell Latitude XPi. It came with only
> a 3.5 floppy drive. The 3.5 floppy is built in. I bought it off eBay
> and thought I would just swap out the floppy drive for a cd drive, and
> then do the install from the cd-drive, but when I got it I found out
> the 3.5 was built in (it isn't one of the pull out and replace kind,
> it's just a slit in the front case). So, now I'm wondering how the hell
> to install an OS. I've decided to use Windows 98 SE and I have the
> install kit, Windows 98 and startup diskette.
>
> The hard drive I will be installing this on is brand new, so
> obviously I will have to format it. This is what I was thinking:
>
> I bought an external HD case that my new HD will fit in. Put the new
> HD in the external case, connect it to my desktop (windows xp home),
> format it (FAT32), transfer all the files from the Windows 98 disk to
> the HD, put the HD in my laptop and run the 98 setup.
>
> Does this sound like might work?
>
> Any ideas would be greatly appreciated?
>
> Thanks
>
June 8, 2005 5:32:51 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

BigJim wrote:
> should make two partitions one big one small copy all 98 files to the
> smaller partition. Boot with a 98 disk login on
> to the 98 partition and install. This way if 98 corrupts you can reinstall
> it from the second partition.

That's a good idea if the hard drive is big enough to make it practical.
Works just fine with one partition.

I'd recommending formatting the drive in the laptop. I've had problems
with older laptops recognizing the drive geometry differently, on some
drives, from the desktop. The thing would load but not boot in the
laptop. Formatting in the laptop solved the problem.

Pulling the drive to load the 98 CD files is faster, but you can
also use laplink on the parallel port to transfer the files.
You only need about 100MB of them. If you do it while you're
sleeping, you won't care how long it takes.

You didn't mention how big the drive is. There may be BIOS issues.
If you have to use a drive overlay, that complicates loading it in the
desktop.
mike

>
> <RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1118207614.779291.217260@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>
>> OK, here's the problem. I have a Dell Latitude XPi. It came with only
>>a 3.5 floppy drive. The 3.5 floppy is built in. I bought it off eBay
>>and thought I would just swap out the floppy drive for a cd drive, and
>>then do the install from the cd-drive, but when I got it I found out
>>the 3.5 was built in (it isn't one of the pull out and replace kind,
>>it's just a slit in the front case). So, now I'm wondering how the hell
>>to install an OS. I've decided to use Windows 98 SE and I have the
>>install kit, Windows 98 and startup diskette.
>>
>> The hard drive I will be installing this on is brand new, so
>>obviously I will have to format it. This is what I was thinking:
>>
>> I bought an external HD case that my new HD will fit in. Put the new
>>HD in the external case, connect it to my desktop (windows xp home),
>>format it (FAT32), transfer all the files from the Windows 98 disk to
>>the HD, put the HD in my laptop and run the 98 setup.
>>
>> Does this sound like might work?
>>
>> Any ideas would be greatly appreciated?
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>
>
>



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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 8, 2005 9:11:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

It's a 6 GB HD.

I saw someone say to format it in the laptop. Is that the FDISK
command?.

Put the HD in the laptop, and format it with the startup diskette,

Then do the transfer from my desktop?

P.S. This is a nice Dell Laptop and I got it for $40. Only thing is the
HD was missing.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 8, 2005 4:55:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com wrote:
>I saw someone say to format it in the laptop. Is that the FDISK
>command?.

Fdisk followed by format/s

>Put the HD in the laptop, and format it with the startup diskette,
>
>Then do the transfer from my desktop?

Yes, format it in the laptop, get it to the point where it will boot
DOS on the laptop, and give you a C:> prompt.

Then pull the drive, put it in your case, connect it to your other
machine, and copy all the install files over to (say) c:\win98se.

Then put it back in your laptop, boot, cd \win98se and run setup.

You may want to goto the Dell WWWebsite, put in your Service Code,
download all the drivers, and put them on the drive while you are
copying the win98 files.
June 8, 2005 5:40:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

The command to format is format and is used to format partitions not disk
drives. Fdisk is used to create partitions on a hard drive. So you need to
run fdisk first and create a partition, then run format to format that
partition.

<RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1118232673.940945.284070@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
It's a 6 GB HD.

I saw someone say to format it in the laptop. Is that the FDISK
command?.

Put the HD in the laptop, and format it with the startup diskette,

Then do the transfer from my desktop?

P.S. This is a nice Dell Laptop and I got it for $40. Only thing is the
HD was missing.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 8, 2005 8:46:19 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

How do I make the drive bootable?

I partitioned the drive, formatted(in the laptop) then transfered the
files to the HD. put it back in my laptop without the boot disk in, and
it prompted me to re-insert disk and press any key. I did this and was
able to get to the C:/> prompt. I am lost from this point. I tried
typing 'setup'. no luck, got a "no file found" or something like that.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 8, 2005 9:42:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

You are very close. Copy the \Win98 folder from the CD to the hard
drive. That's all you need, and it has the setup program in it. Make
the hard drive bootable to a C:\> prompt (you can do this from a floppy
after it's back in the laptop).

Note, leave the \Win98 folder on the hard drive if you have room.


RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com wrote:

> OK, here's the problem. I have a Dell Latitude XPi. It came with only
> a 3.5 floppy drive. The 3.5 floppy is built in. I bought it off eBay
> and thought I would just swap out the floppy drive for a cd drive, and
> then do the install from the cd-drive, but when I got it I found out
> the 3.5 was built in (it isn't one of the pull out and replace kind,
> it's just a slit in the front case). So, now I'm wondering how the hell
> to install an OS. I've decided to use Windows 98 SE and I have the
> install kit, Windows 98 and startup diskette.
>
> The hard drive I will be installing this on is brand new, so
> obviously I will have to format it. This is what I was thinking:
>
> I bought an external HD case that my new HD will fit in. Put the new
> HD in the external case, connect it to my desktop (windows xp home),
> format it (FAT32), transfer all the files from the Windows 98 disk to
> the HD, put the HD in my laptop and run the 98 setup.
>
> Does this sound like might work?
>
> Any ideas would be greatly appreciated?
>
> Thanks
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 8, 2005 9:51:30 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

No, FDISK is to partition the drive, Format is to format it. You will
use both FDISK and Format, in that order.

I would not recommend the two partition approach. Rather, FDISK and
Format (in the laptop), and make the hard drive DOS bootable (also in
the laptop), then copy the \Win98 folder from the 98SE CD to the root
directory of the hard drive. Then put it back into the laptop and run
the setup program. If space is a concern (it's not, really), you can
delete the "tour" and "OLS" folders that are within the Win98 folder.
On some cds, it's "Win9x" instead of "Win98".


RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com wrote:

> It's a 6 GB HD.
>
> I saw someone say to format it in the laptop. Is that the FDISK
> command?.
>
> Put the HD in the laptop, and format it with the startup diskette,
>
> Then do the transfer from my desktop?
>
> P.S. This is a nice Dell Laptop and I got it for $40. Only thing is the
> HD was missing.
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 8, 2005 10:42:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com wrote:
>
> I bought an external HD case that my new HD will fit in. Put the
> new HD in the external case, connect it to my desktop (windows xp
> home), format it (FAT32), transfer all the files from the Windows 98
> disk to the HD, put the HD in my laptop and run the 98 setup.
>
> Does this sound like might work?
>
It'll work fine. You only need the files in the Win98 folder, unless
there's some model specific drivers elsewhere. These are likely to be
outdated anyway. Download those off the Dell site after the OS is
installed. You really should have some way to load big files, however.
Either a large USB 'thumb' drive, or a USB CD would work (might as well get
a burner...not much more than a simple CD ROM these days).

OTOH, if you have a network--even a USB network cable--you might not need
any of the above. Simply load anything you need from there. Most software
will even allow you install from over a network (not the OS, unfortunately).

jak
> Any ideas would be greatly appreciated?
>
> Thanks
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 9, 2005 1:29:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Cd win98
setup /is
PS... Hope you used WIN98SE

then drivers
then IE remove (google time)
then IE6SP_1
Then DX8.1
then DX9C if it will take it
Then the unofficial cumulative update file (major geeks)
then AVG (grisoft) free and spybot search&destroy
Wheeeeeeeeeeee!


On 8 Jun 2005 16:46:19 -0700, RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com wrote:

>How do I make the drive bootable?
>
>I partitioned the drive, formatted(in the laptop) then transfered the
>files to the HD. put it back in my laptop without the boot disk in, and
>it prompted me to re-insert disk and press any key. I did this and was
>able to get to the C:/> prompt. I am lost from this point. I tried
>typing 'setup'. no luck, got a "no file found" or something like that.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 9, 2005 5:23:55 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On 7 Jun 2005 22:13:34 -0700, RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com wrote:

>
> OK, here's the problem. I have a Dell Latitude XPi. It came with only
>a 3.5 floppy drive. The 3.5 floppy is built in. I bought it off eBay
>and thought I would just swap out the floppy drive for a cd drive, and
>then do the install from the cd-drive, but when I got it I found out
>the 3.5 was built in (it isn't one of the pull out and replace kind,
>it's just a slit in the front case). So, now I'm wondering how the hell
>to install an OS. I've decided to use Windows 98 SE and I have the
>install kit, Windows 98 and startup diskette.
>
> The hard drive I will be installing this on is brand new, so
>obviously I will have to format it. This is what I was thinking:
>
> I bought an external HD case that my new HD will fit in. Put the new
>HD in the external case, connect it to my desktop (windows xp home),
>format it (FAT32), transfer all the files from the Windows 98 disk to
>the HD, put the HD in my laptop and run the 98 setup.
>
> Does this sound like might work?
>
> Any ideas would be greatly appreciated?
>
> Thanks

The way I do it:

Go to the Dell website (on the Desktop) and download all the drivers
for the laptop.

Put the HD in the laptop, partition it into a 5GB partition and a 1 GB
partition. Format each partition.(I usually label the 1GB partition
'Software').The reason for doing this is if you have to install
something later it'll do it from that partition and not demand the
CD). The reason for having the separate partition is if something
screws up you can reformat the C: drive and still re-install the OS.
The reason for 1GB is so you can transfer any files over to it for
safekeeping in case of a format (documents, whatever). Maybe even make
the partitions 4.5 and 1.5 GB.. Your choice.

Now, you want to copy the W98 CD (the stuff in the root directory, and
the 'add-ons', 'drivers', 'tools', and 'win98' directories) to the 1GB
partition. Also include all the drivers for the Dell.

One other way of transfering the files over from the desktop is to get
a 3.5" to 2.5" adapter and plug the drive right into the IDE on the
Desktop.



--
If you can't figure out my address from this,
then we probably don't have a lot to talk about:
bpoulton$vcn:bc:ca
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 9, 2005 8:03:32 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

You can do it when you format with the "/s" switch:

A:\>Format/s

or you can do it later with the "SYS" command:

A:\>SYS C:

[makes C: bootable]


RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com wrote:
> How do I make the drive bootable?
>
> I partitioned the drive, formatted(in the laptop) then transfered the
> files to the HD. put it back in my laptop without the boot disk in, and
> it prompted me to re-insert disk and press any key. I did this and was
> able to get to the C:/> prompt. I am lost from this point. I tried
> typing 'setup'. no luck, got a "no file found" or something like that.
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 9, 2005 4:06:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

1) get the win98 floppy disk install set
2) pull HD, add to 2.5" to 3.5" IDE converter for $10, attach to
desktop, fdisk,format, make it primary, active & bootable partitioned,
and and copy \win98 folder to the HD, then drop HD into laptop to
continue the setup process by running setup.exe from the \win98 folder.
3) copy everything onto multiple floppy disks, and copy onto the laptop
HD. You can use dos, pkzip, etc. to do this to move the entire \win98
folder to the laptop (assuming it's already fdisk/formatted with a
primary active bootable partition).
4) laplink/dos interlink/etc the \win98 folder over by serial or
parallel cables.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 9, 2005 9:47:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

William, P., N., Smith wrote:
>
> RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com wrote:
> >I saw someone say to format it in the laptop. Is that the FDISK
> >command?.
>
> Fdisk followed by format/s
>
> >Put the HD in the laptop, and format it with the startup diskette,
> >
> >Then do the transfer from my desktop?
>
> Yes, format it in the laptop, get it to the point where it will boot
> DOS on the laptop, and give you a C:> prompt.
>
> Then pull the drive, put it in your case, connect it to your other
> machine, and copy all the install files over to (say) c:\win98se.
>
> Then put it back in your laptop, boot, cd \win98se and run setup.
>
> You may want to goto the Dell WWWebsite, put in your Service Code,
> download all the drivers, and put them on the drive while you are
> copying the win98 files.

Good idea to d/l all the drivers needed for 98 at the same time... It is REALLY
smart to create two partitions, C and D, and keep all the install files on the D
drive. If the HD is large enough (bigger than 6-8GB) then data can be
backed-up/saved on the D also in case C drive crashes. I do that to ALL my HD's
in addition to saving back-ups off the machine in case the HD dies.

TJ
=================================================================
Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
as if any other time isn't worth noting....
Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 9, 2005 9:52:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:
>
> No, FDISK is to partition the drive, Format is to format it. You will
> use both FDISK and Format, in that order.
>
> I would not recommend the two partition approach.

can you explain why? Having the install files on the D drive just makes sense.
If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're constantly having
to search for the Install CD. If you're out on the road and Windows goombs up,
unless you packed your install CD, you're screwed.

TJ
=================================================================
Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
as if any other time isn't worth noting....
Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 9, 2005 9:52:28 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote:
>If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're constantly having
>to search for the Install CD. If you're out on the road and Windows goombs up,
>unless you packed your install CD, you're screwed.

What's wrong with having them in either c:\win98 or
c:\windows\options\cabs ???
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 9, 2005 10:03:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com wrote:
>
> How do I make the drive bootable?
>
> I partitioned the drive, formatted(in the laptop) then transfered the
> files to the HD. put it back in my laptop without the boot disk in, and
> it prompted me to re-insert disk and press any key. I did this and was
> able to get to the C:/> prompt. I am lost from this point. I tried
> typing 'setup'. no luck, got a "no file found" or something like that.

Put the floppy in, restart the computer, when you get the C: prompt, switch back
to the floppy drive, type "SYS C:" and enter. You'll get a msg "SYSTEM
TRANSFERRED". Remove the floppy and reboot, it should boot from the HD now.

TJ
=================================================================
Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
as if any other time isn't worth noting....
Michael Rarfit
June 10, 2005 2:47:28 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Thu, 09 Jun 2005 17:52:27 GMT, Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC
wrote:

>Having the install files on the D drive just makes sense.
>If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're
>constantly having to search for the Install CD.

And if I remember correctly W98 wants access to the
installation files even when you just want to *remove*
a comm protocol, not to mention when you add one.


Lars
Stockholm
http://web.telia.com/~u84406120/
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 3:42:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

It's only a 6 gig drive; on a drive that small, I don't think that
partitioning the drive buys you anything.

I certainly do agree that the install files should be on the drive, but
just put them in C:\Win98 (do not put them in the more common location,
C:\Windows\Options\Cabs). Also, create a folder C:\DOS, that has all of
the DOS utilities (copied from C:\Windows\Command), and also the
"missing" utilities copied from the \Tools\Oldmsdos folder of the
Windows CD. Then if you ever need to reinstall, all you do is:

C:\>Deltree \Windows
C:\>Deltree \Program Files

and you are ready to do a clean install without reformatting, and
without losing any data in "My Documents":

C:\>CD \Win98
C:\Win98>Setup

The matter of partitioning or not isn't a big deal, but for a 6 gig
drive, I'd just keep everything in one partition. Now if the drive was
30 gigs or larger, things would be different. But even then, I'd keep
the install files and DOS commands in C:\Win98 and C:\DOS.


Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:

> Barry Watzman wrote:
>
>>No, FDISK is to partition the drive, Format is to format it. You will
>>use both FDISK and Format, in that order.
>>
>>I would not recommend the two partition approach.
>
>
> can you explain why? Having the install files on the D drive just makes sense.
> If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're constantly having
> to search for the Install CD. If you're out on the road and Windows goombs up,
> unless you packed your install CD, you're screwed.
>
> TJ
> =================================================================
> Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
> as if any other time isn't worth noting....
> Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 3:42:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:42A8D3FB.6070906@neo.rr.com...
> It's only a 6 gig drive; on a drive that small, I don't think that
> partitioning the drive buys you anything.
>
> I certainly do agree that the install files should be on the drive, but
> just put them in C:\Win98 (do not put them in the more common location,
> C:\Windows\Options\Cabs). Also, create a folder C:\DOS, that has all of
> the DOS utilities (copied from C:\Windows\Command), and also the
> "missing" utilities copied from the \Tools\Oldmsdos folder of the
> Windows CD. Then if you ever need to reinstall, all you do is:
>
> C:\>Deltree \Windows
> C:\>Deltree \Program Files
>
> and you are ready to do a clean install without reformatting, and
> without losing any data in "My Documents":
>
> C:\>CD \Win98
> C:\Win98>Setup
>
If you do this--and you use Outlook or OE--make sure that you change the
default location of the address book and message folders. By default they
reside in the Windows directory. Although they are easy to change, I
followed the advice given above and lost every email and every addy.
Fortunately I had a 'not too old' backup to restore from....

jak
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 3:42:56 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

It's only a 6 gig drive; on a drive that small, I don't think that
partitioning the drive buys you anything.

I certainly do agree that the install files should be on the drive, but
just put them in C:\Win98 (do not put them in the more common location,
C:\Windows\Options\Cabs). Also, create a folder C:\DOS, that has all of
the DOS utilities (copied from C:\Windows\Command), and also the
"missing" utilities copied from the \Tools\Oldmsdos folder of the
Windows CD. Then if you ever need to reinstall, all you do is:

C:\>Deltree \Windows
C:\>Deltree \Program Files

and you are ready to do a clean install without reformatting, and
without losing any data in "My Documents":

C:\>CD \Win98
C:\Win98>Setup

The matter of partitioning or not isn't a big deal, but for a 6 gig
drive, I'd just keep everything in one partition. Now if the drive was
30 gigs or larger, things would be different. But even then, I'd keep
the install files and DOS commands in C:\Win98 and C:\DOS.


Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:

> Barry Watzman wrote:
>
>>No, FDISK is to partition the drive, Format is to format it. You will
>>use both FDISK and Format, in that order.
>>
>>I would not recommend the two partition approach.
>
>
> can you explain why? Having the install files on the D drive just makes sense.
> If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're constantly having
> to search for the Install CD. If you're out on the road and Windows goombs up,
> unless you packed your install CD, you're screwed.
>
> TJ
> =================================================================
> Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
> as if any other time isn't worth noting....
> Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 3:42:57 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:4u4qe.22053$iu.4699@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
> It's only a 6 gig drive; on a drive that small, I don't think that
> partitioning the drive buys you anything.
<snip>

Another issue with partitioning: Windows programs 'want' to install
automatically in C:\Program Files. Usually you can change the default, but
it's a bother. Then you end up with two 'program files' directories, one in
the C drive, and one in the extended portion; because some programs will NOT
install on D and some never give you the option. I used to religously
partition every drive into two sections, but decided it wasn't worth it.

jak
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 5:05:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

The statement was "Having the install files on the D drive just makes
sense."

Yes, I take issue with that, but not in the sense that everyone seems to
be presuming. If I was rewriting the statement, I would write it as:

"Having the install files on the hard drive just makes sense."

Where I differ from the original recommendation isn't in keeping the
installation files on the hard drive, but rather with the presumption
that if they are to be kept on the hard drive, it needs to be on D:,
given that this is a relatively small hard drive. They will do just
fine in C:\Win98, and you can still do a full, clean, fresh install of
Windows on C: if necessary.


Lars@fake.com wrote:

> On Thu, 09 Jun 2005 17:52:27 GMT, Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC
> wrote:
>
>
>>Having the install files on the D drive just makes sense.
>>If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're
>>constantly having to search for the Install CD.
>
>
> And if I remember correctly W98 wants access to the
> installation files even when you just want to *remove*
> a comm protocol, not to mention when you add one.
>
>
> Lars
> Stockholm
> http://web.telia.com/~u84406120/
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 5:06:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

The statement was "Having the install files on the D drive just makes
sense."

Yes, I take issue with that, but not in the sense that everyone seems to
be presuming. If I was rewriting the statement, I would write it as:

"Having the install files on the hard drive just makes sense."

Where I differ from the original recommendation isn't in keeping the
installation files on the hard drive, but rather with the presumption
that if they are to be kept on the hard drive, it needs to be on D:,
given that this is a relatively small hard drive. They will do just
fine in C:\Win98, and you can still do a full, clean, fresh install of
Windows on C: if necessary.


Lars@fake.com wrote:

> On Thu, 09 Jun 2005 17:52:27 GMT, Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC
> wrote:
>
>
>>Having the install files on the D drive just makes sense.
>>If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're
>>constantly having to search for the Install CD.
>
>
> And if I remember correctly W98 wants access to the
> installation files even when you just want to *remove*
> a comm protocol, not to mention when you add one.
>
>
> Lars
> Stockholm
> http://web.telia.com/~u84406120/
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 5:09:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Exactly. But I'd argue in favor of C:\Win98 and against (the admittedly
more common) Windows/options/cabs for two reasons:

1. Sometimes, you have to actually manually type the path to the files,
and Win98 is a LOT shorter

and

2. If you want to do a clean install, you can do that by blowing away
C:\Windows and C:\Program Files. However, if the cab files are located
within C:\Windows or C:\Program Files, it creates one additional issue
to deal with.

Therefore, for both reasons, C:\Win98 is a better place to put them.


William P. N. Smith wrote:

> "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote:
>
>>If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're constantly having
>>to search for the Install CD. If you're out on the road and Windows goombs up,
>>unless you packed your install CD, you're screwed.
>
>
> What's wrong with having them in either c:\win98 or
> c:\windows\options\cabs ???
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 5:10:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Exactly. But I'd argue in favor of C:\Win98 and against (the admittedly
more common) Windows/options/cabs for two reasons:

1. Sometimes, you have to actually manually type the path to the files,
and Win98 is a LOT shorter

and

2. If you want to do a clean install, you can do that by blowing away
C:\Windows and C:\Program Files. However, if the cab files are located
within C:\Windows or C:\Program Files, it creates one additional issue
to deal with.

Therefore, for both reasons, C:\Win98 is a better place to put them.


William P. N. Smith wrote:

> "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote:
>
>>If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're constantly having
>>to search for the Install CD. If you're out on the road and Windows goombs up,
>>unless you packed your install CD, you're screwed.
>
>
> What's wrong with having them in either c:\win98 or
> c:\windows\options\cabs ???
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 5:18:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I totally agree with you about moving the message stores for outlook and
outlook express and cannot understand, for the life of me, why Microsoft
would have put them in \Windows instead of in \My Documents, the logical
place to put what are, in fact, data or "document" files.

[In my own case, I put them in \My Documents\E-Mail]

jakdedert wrote:
>
> If you do this--and you use Outlook or OE--make sure that you change the
> default location of the address book and message folders. By default they
> reside in the Windows directory. Although they are easy to change, I
> followed the advice given above and lost every email and every addy.
> Fortunately I had a 'not too old' backup to restore from....
>
> jak
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 7:39:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

William, P., N., Smith wrote:
>
> "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote:
> >If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're constantly having
> >to search for the Install CD. If you're out on the road and Windows goombs up,
> >unless you packed your install CD, you're screwed.
>
> What's wrong with having them in either c:\win98 or
> c:\windows\options\cabs ???

Bill,

Just -how- are you going to reformat/reinstall from C: when C: is crashed?
=================================================================
Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
as if any other time isn't worth noting....
Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 7:39:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:
> William, P., N., Smith wrote:
>>
>> "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote:
>>> If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're
>>> constantly having to search for the Install CD. If you're out on
>>> the road and Windows goombs up, unless you packed your install CD,
>>> you're screwed.
>>
>> What's wrong with having them in either c:\win98 or
>> c:\windows\options\cabs ???
>
> Bill,
>
> Just -how- are you going to reformat/reinstall from C: when C: is
> crashed?
> =================================================================

You 'do' have a emergency start floppy...if not, how are you going to even
boot from C?

I can think of several ways, but if the disk is 'crashed' it's unlikely to
be formattable anyway, partitioned or not. Define 'crashed....'

If the disk is salvable, you're gonna have better luck doing anything with
it as a slave in another computer.

jak
> Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
> as if any other time isn't worth noting....
> Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 7:43:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:
>
> It's only a 6 gig drive; on a drive that small, I don't think that
> partitioning the drive buys you anything.

Even with a 6GB drive, I'd make a D, sized to 300mb, put the W .cabs and a DOS
folder on it. NO ONE will miss 300mb, make it smaller if you want but it's just
plain smart... and partitions on a 30GB is ok? I'd make D: 's on anything 5GB
and bigger.

TJ
=================================================================
Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
as if any other time isn't worth noting....
Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 7:43:28 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:
> Barry Watzman wrote:
>>
>> It's only a 6 gig drive; on a drive that small, I don't think that
>> partitioning the drive buys you anything.
>
> Even with a 6GB drive, I'd make a D, sized to 300mb, put the W .cabs
> and a DOS folder on it. NO ONE will miss 300mb, make it smaller if
> you want but it's just plain smart... and partitions on a 30GB is
> ok? I'd make D: 's on anything 5GB and bigger.
>
But why?

jak
> TJ
> =================================================================
> Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
> as if any other time isn't worth noting....
> Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 7:45:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:
>
> The statement was "Having the install files on the D drive just makes
> sense."
>
> Yes, I take issue with that, but not in the sense that everyone seems to
> be presuming. If I was rewriting the statement, I would write it as:
>
> "Having the install files on the hard drive just makes sense."
>
> Where I differ from the original recommendation isn't in keeping the
> installation files on the hard drive, but rather with the presumption
> that if they are to be kept on the hard drive, it needs to be on D:,
> given that this is a relatively small hard drive. They will do just
> fine in C:\Win98, and you can still do a full, clean, fresh install of
> Windows on C: if necessary.

fine, you do it your way, I'll do it mine and see who saves more data in a crash
=================================================================
Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
as if any other time isn't worth noting....
Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 7:45:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:
> Barry Watzman wrote:
>>
>> The statement was "Having the install files on the D drive just makes
>> sense."
>>
>> Yes, I take issue with that, but not in the sense that everyone
>> seems to be presuming. If I was rewriting the statement, I would
>> write it as:
>>
>> "Having the install files on the hard drive just makes sense."
>>
>> Where I differ from the original recommendation isn't in keeping the
>> installation files on the hard drive, but rather with the presumption
>> that if they are to be kept on the hard drive, it needs to be on D:,
>> given that this is a relatively small hard drive. They will do just
>> fine in C:\Win98, and you can still do a full, clean, fresh install
>> of Windows on C: if necessary.
>
> fine, you do it your way, I'll do it mine and see who saves more data
> in a crash
>

How often does that happen to you, anyway? IME, if the disk goes
south--considering it's the same physical drive anyway--*everything* on it's
gonna go bye bye. If you've had a bunch of disasters with just your C:
partition which didn't affect the D: (viruses are the only reason that come
to mind), you're not taking enough care with your data anyway.

I'm going to save all or most of my data, because it's backed up over the
network to another computer.

I've followed this advice on at least half a dozen machines, and avoided it
on at least half a dozen more. I fail to see any difference...other than
it's a pain in the butt to do.

jak
=================================================================
> Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
> as if any other time isn't worth noting....
> Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 10, 2005 8:15:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote:
>William, P., N., Smith wrote:

>> What's wrong with having them in either c:\win98 or
>> c:\windows\options\cabs ???

>Just -how- are you going to reformat/reinstall from C: when C: is crashed?

As 'jak' pointed out, I've never seen a c: crash that didn't take out
all the other partitions on that physical drive. I'd do it the same
way I did the first time, format/s the drive in the laptop, put it in
one of my other machines for file transfer, and rebuild from there.

Well, actually, I'd boot from floppy and restore the most recent Ghost
backup over the network interface, but that's a detail...
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 11, 2005 3:11:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:

> You can do it when you format with the "/s" switch:
>
> A:\>Format/s
>
> or you can do it later with the "SYS" command:
>
> A:\>SYS C:
>
> [makes C: bootable]

It may also be necessary to go into fdisk and set the partition (there
should be only one at this point) active.

> RaoulDuke.73@gmail.com wrote:
>> How do I make the drive bootable?
>>
>> I partitioned the drive, formatted(in the laptop) then transfered the
>> files to the HD. put it back in my laptop without the boot disk in, and
>> it prompted me to re-insert disk and press any key. I did this and was
>> able to get to the C:/> prompt. I am lost from this point. I tried
>> typing 'setup'. no luck, got a "no file found" or something like that.
>>

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 11, 2005 3:13:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:

> Barry Watzman wrote:
>>
>> No, FDISK is to partition the drive, Format is to format it. You will
>> use both FDISK and Format, in that order.
>>
>> I would not recommend the two partition approach.
>
> can you explain why? Having the install files on the D drive just makes
> sense. If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're
> constantly having
> to search for the Install CD. If you're out on the road and Windows
> goombs up, unless you packed your install CD, you're screwed.

Why would you have search for the install CD? Just copy all the files from
the CD into a folder. It doesn't have to have its own partition.
>
> TJ
> =================================================================
> Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
> as if any other time isn't worth noting....
> Michael Rarfit

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 11, 2005 3:16:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:

> William, P., N., Smith wrote:
>>
>> "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote:
>> >If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're constantly
>> >having
>> >to search for the Install CD. If you're out on the road and Windows
>> >goombs up, unless you packed your install CD, you're screwed.
>>
>> What's wrong with having them in either c:\win98 or
>> c:\windows\options\cabs ???
>
> Bill,
>
> Just -how- are you going to reformat/reinstall from C: when C: is crashed?

If C is crashed so badly that you can't get it to boot to a DOS prompt or
access the files after a boot from diskette then you probably aren't going
to be able to get at any other partition on the drive.


> =================================================================
> Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
> as if any other time isn't worth noting....
> Michael Rarfit

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 11, 2005 3:19:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:

> Barry Watzman wrote:
>>
>> The statement was "Having the install files on the D drive just makes
>> sense."
>>
>> Yes, I take issue with that, but not in the sense that everyone seems to
>> be presuming. If I was rewriting the statement, I would write it as:
>>
>> "Having the install files on the hard drive just makes sense."
>>
>> Where I differ from the original recommendation isn't in keeping the
>> installation files on the hard drive, but rather with the presumption
>> that if they are to be kept on the hard drive, it needs to be on D:,
>> given that this is a relatively small hard drive. They will do just
>> fine in C:\Win98, and you can still do a full, clean, fresh install of
>> Windows on C: if necessary.
>
> fine, you do it your way, I'll do it mine and see who saves more data in a
> crash

In a real crash you won't save any data at all because it will all be chips
bouncing around inside the drive capsule. But you've probably never
encountered a real crash.

Regardless, there is no manner in which one can operate a single machine
with a single storage device so as to guarantee that your data will never
be lost. That's what backups and redundant hosts and the like are all
about.

> =================================================================
> Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
> as if any other time isn't worth noting....
> Michael Rarfit

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 12, 2005 8:09:23 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"J. Clarke" wrote:
>
> Barry Watzman wrote:
>
> > You can do it when you format with the "/s" switch:
> >
> > A:\>Format/s
> >
> > or you can do it later with the "SYS" command:
> >
> > A:\>SYS C:
> >
> > [makes C: bootable]
>
> It may also be necessary to go into fdisk and set the partition (there
> should be only one at this point) active.

One what? Partition or -active- partition? You can make as many partitions as
you want/need but make just one active.

=================================================================
Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
as if any other time isn't worth noting....
Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 12, 2005 8:10:53 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"J. Clarke" wrote:
>
> Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:
>
> > Barry Watzman wrote:
> >>
> >> No, FDISK is to partition the drive, Format is to format it. You will
> >> use both FDISK and Format, in that order.
> >>
> >> I would not recommend the two partition approach.
> >
> > can you explain why? Having the install files on the D drive just makes
> > sense. If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98, you're
> > constantly having
> > to search for the Install CD. If you're out on the road and Windows
> > goombs up, unless you packed your install CD, you're screwed.
>
> Why would you have search for the install CD? Just copy all the files from
> the CD into a folder. It doesn't have to have its own partition.

Hey, follow the thread here...

If you copy the files into a folder on C, and C crashes, you could still get to
D to reinstall. If you copy everything onto C, and you cant get to it anymore,
UNLESS you packed the CD, you're hosed...

Having a D partition gives you a place to put backups, install files, or
drivers.

If the -whole- drive dies, yeah, you cant get to anything, but it it goombs up
from a bad update or virus, you have a good partition to boot from/get to.

> > TJ
> > =================================================================
> > Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
> > as if any other time isn't worth noting....
> > Michael Rarfit
>
> --
> --John
> to email, dial "usenet" and validate
> (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)

--
=================================================================
Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
as if any other time isn't worth noting....
Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 12, 2005 8:15:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"J. Clarke" wrote:
>
> Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:
>
> > Barry Watzman wrote:
> >>
> >> The statement was "Having the install files on the D drive just makes
> >> sense."
> >>
> >> Yes, I take issue with that, but not in the sense that everyone seems to
> >> be presuming. If I was rewriting the statement, I would write it as:
> >>
> >> "Having the install files on the hard drive just makes sense."
> >>
> >> Where I differ from the original recommendation isn't in keeping the
> >> installation files on the hard drive, but rather with the presumption
> >> that if they are to be kept on the hard drive, it needs to be on D:,
> >> given that this is a relatively small hard drive. They will do just
> >> fine in C:\Win98, and you can still do a full, clean, fresh install of
> >> Windows on C: if necessary.
> >
> > fine, you do it your way, I'll do it mine and see who saves more data in a
> > crash
>
> In a real crash you won't save any data at all because it will all be chips
> bouncing around inside the drive capsule. But you've probably never
> encountered a real crash.

You'd be wrong on that count. 'Several instant drive deaths. But then they
were MFM and RLL's. Frozen spindle, and a spectacular electrical death.

> Regardless, there is no manner in which one can operate a single machine
> with a single storage device so as to guarantee that your data will never
> be lost. That's what backups and redundant hosts and the like are all
> about.

Depends on what made C: unreadable/die

> > =================================================================
> > Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
> > as if any other time isn't worth noting....
> > Michael Rarfit
>
> --
> --John
> to email, dial "usenet" and validate
> (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)

--
=================================================================
Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
as if any other time isn't worth noting....
Michael Rarfit
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 12, 2005 2:52:50 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:

> "J. Clarke" wrote:
>>
>> Barry Watzman wrote:
>>
>> > You can do it when you format with the "/s" switch:
>> >
>> > A:\>Format/s
>> >
>> > or you can do it later with the "SYS" command:
>> >
>> > A:\>SYS C:
>> >
>> > [makes C: bootable]
>>
>> It may also be necessary to go into fdisk and set the partition (there
>> should be only one at this point) active.
>
> One what? Partition or -active- partition? You can make as many
> partitions as you want/need but make just one active.

I was observing that the disk, as set up per the earlier discussion, would
most likely have only one partition, I was not making a recommendation on
the number of partitions.

Geez.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 12, 2005 2:59:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:

> "J. Clarke" wrote:
>>
>> Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:
>>
>> > Barry Watzman wrote:
>> >>
>> >> The statement was "Having the install files on the D drive just makes
>> >> sense."
>> >>
>> >> Yes, I take issue with that, but not in the sense that everyone seems
>> >> to
>> >> be presuming. If I was rewriting the statement, I would write it as:
>> >>
>> >> "Having the install files on the hard drive just makes sense."
>> >>
>> >> Where I differ from the original recommendation isn't in keeping the
>> >> installation files on the hard drive, but rather with the presumption
>> >> that if they are to be kept on the hard drive, it needs to be on D:,
>> >> given that this is a relatively small hard drive. They will do just
>> >> fine in C:\Win98, and you can still do a full, clean, fresh install of
>> >> Windows on C: if necessary.
>> >
>> > fine, you do it your way, I'll do it mine and see who saves more data
>> > in a crash
>>
>> In a real crash you won't save any data at all because it will all be
>> chips
>> bouncing around inside the drive capsule. But you've probably never
>> encountered a real crash.
>
> You'd be wrong on that count. 'Several instant drive deaths. But then
> they
> were MFM and RLL's. Frozen spindle, and a spectacular electrical death.

A frozen spindle is not a crash. It's a frozen spindle. A crash is a head
impacting the platter with sufficient force to cause damage. "Crash" is
not a generic term meaning "disk failure", it is a specific kind of disk
failure. In any case, a frozen spindle renders the whole disk unreadable,
as does a "spectacular electrical death".

>> Regardless, there is no manner in which one can operate a single machine
>> with a single storage device so as to guarantee that your data will never
>> be lost. That's what backups and redundant hosts and the like are all
>> about.
>
> Depends on what made C: unreadable/die

Read what I wrote again. And remember that failure is not the only mode of
data loss.

>> > =================================================================
>> > Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
>> > as if any other time isn't worth noting....
>> > Michael Rarfit
>>
>> --
>> --John
>> to email, dial "usenet" and validate
>> (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
>

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 12, 2005 3:03:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:

> "J. Clarke" wrote:
>>
>> Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:
>>
>> > Barry Watzman wrote:
>> >>
>> >> No, FDISK is to partition the drive, Format is to format it. You will
>> >> use both FDISK and Format, in that order.
>> >>
>> >> I would not recommend the two partition approach.
>> >
>> > can you explain why? Having the install files on the D drive just
>> > makes sense. If you dont make a D drive, making ANY changes to 98,
>> > you're constantly having
>> > to search for the Install CD. If you're out on the road and Windows
>> > goombs up, unless you packed your install CD, you're screwed.
>>
>> Why would you have search for the install CD? Just copy all the files
>> from
>> the CD into a folder. It doesn't have to have its own partition.
>
> Hey, follow the thread here...
>
> If you copy the files into a folder on C, and C crashes, you could still
> get to
> D to reinstall. If you copy everything onto C, and you cant get to it
> anymore, UNLESS you packed the CD, you're hosed...

If the failure is that severe then you've already lost all your data, so so
what?

> Having a D partition gives you a place to put backups, install files, or
> drivers.

There is no point in putting backups on the same disk.

> If the -whole- drive dies, yeah, you cant get to anything, but it it
> goombs up from a bad update or virus, you have a good partition to boot
> from/get to.

And of course the virus is not going to contaminate executable files on the
second partition. Sure it isn't. As for a "bad update" I've never seen an
"update" "goomb up" a drive so severely that I could not delete the OS
directory and reinstall.

>
>> > TJ
>> > =================================================================
>> > Pilots track their lives by the number of hours in the air,
>> > as if any other time isn't worth noting....
>> > Michael Rarfit
>>
>> --
>> --John
>> to email, dial "usenet" and validate
>> (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
>

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
!