Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

1st build - opinion

Last response: in Systems
Share
June 10, 2011 8:12:14 PM

Here is the parts I would like to order for my new computer. It is my first build and would like to know your opinion.

I just want to do basic stuff with this computer (web surfing, watching HD video on Youtube, maybe a little bit of gaming like my old NHL '09)

Here it is:
-Case: Antec Sonata III (includes a EarthWatts 500 Watt power supply)
-Motherboard: ASUS P8H67-M PRO/CSM REV3.0 H67
-CPU: Intel Core i5 2500 3.3ghz
-RAM: Corsair XMS CMX8GX3M2A1333C9 (2 X 4 GB)
-Hard drive: Western Digital WD Caviar Blue 1TB SATA 6GB/S 7200RPM
-Hard drive 2: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB SATA2 7200RPM 16MB (from the computer I am using right now)
-Optical drive: ASUS DRW-24B1ST 24X SATA DVD Writer

What I am not sure is: compatibility, enough power with a 500W power supply and the RAM (not sure if it is good or not)

Thanks!

More about : 1st build opinion

June 10, 2011 8:30:24 PM

Looks good to me.

The parts are reasonable, and compatible.


Antec psu's are good, and will power a decent graphics card if you should ever want to upgrade graphics for fast action gaming.
As it is, the sandy bridge integrated graphics are fine for HD video and many games.

I think the ram is good, but go to the corsair web site and enter your motherboard. You should get a list of compatible parts.
It is always best to have documented compatibility if an issue should ever arise.

If you can find room in your budget, try to add a ssd for your OS and apps. It will make everything feel much quicker.
60-80gb should be available for $2 per gb.

Take the time now to download and read your case and motherboard manuals, cover to cover.
Many issues will be answered.

--------good luck------------
m
0
l
June 12, 2011 9:47:54 PM

Thanks! I am not going to go for a SSD yet but maybe later. Thanks for the advices.

geofelt said:
Looks good to me.

The parts are reasonable, and compatible.


Antec psu's are good, and will power a decent graphics card if you should ever want to upgrade graphics for fast action gaming.
As it is, the sandy bridge integrated graphics are fine for HD video and many games.

I think the ram is good, but go to the corsair web site and enter your motherboard. You should get a list of compatible parts.
It is always best to have documented compatibility if an issue should ever arise.

If you can find room in your budget, try to add a ssd for your OS and apps. It will make everything feel much quicker.
60-80gb should be available for $2 per gb.

Take the time now to download and read your case and motherboard manuals, cover to cover.
Many issues will be answered.

--------good luck------------

m
0
l
Related resources
June 12, 2011 10:07:57 PM

For what you described for the use of the machine the cost of the i5 2500 seems quite a bit more horse power than is needed.

You could get a i3 2100 instead which would do the things you want to do and use the savings to get a decent discrete graphics card such as Radeon 5670 at about 60-70$.
It will definitely let you play your game at much higher settings than the interated graphics would.

Regardless of the previous the following Z68 based MB will give you much better upgrade path at the same cost.
Gigabyte GA-Z68A-D3-B3
m
0
l
June 12, 2011 10:11:03 PM

Correction to the previous:

If you decide to go with the discrete graphics the Gigabyte board would be better.
If you go with the integrated graphics on the chip you would need something like:Asrock Z68 pro3 that has the needed video connectivity.
m
0
l
June 12, 2011 11:02:05 PM

rvilkman brings up a good point.
For your usage, a 2100 or 2120 will do the job.
the 2120 will have the same clock speed, and have two cores plus hyperthreading.
The normal desktop user, and many gamers will not use more than two cores.
You could use the difference in cost to pay for a ssd.

On the other hand, if you look at a 2500, you might as well look at a 2500K which is only a bit more, and can be clocked at 4.0 with ease.

Regardless, a Z68 based motherboard will give you options, and the cost increase is minimal.
m
0
l
June 13, 2011 1:31:40 AM

ya oc'ing is really easy but probably out of your price range. the i3 2120 seems right for you. also i would go with a 5670
m
0
l
June 13, 2011 4:34:39 AM

Thanks for the advices! The reason why I wanted the i5 2500 was because I am the kind of guy who keeps is computers for 4-5 years. I don't want to buy the minimum right away...

What about the RAM.... I want 8 gigs... will it actually make a difference if I had only 4 gigs? RAM is cheap now and 4 gigs will only make a difference of about 40-50$.
m
0
l

Best solution

June 13, 2011 7:08:01 AM

Generally if you want to go with future proofing your machine so that you don't have to upgrade it other than possibly the video card it seems you should spend a couple of bucks extra and get a Z68 based MB allowing overclocking, get the 2500k which is only 20 or so bucks more than the i5 2500 allowing you to overclock if it is needed and the 4 cores should be enough horsepower for the next couple of years even if your use changes to a more demanding direction.

While you may be able to scrape by with the built in graphics i would still highly recommend a cheap discrete card like the 5670.

If you get the 8GB now I am pretty confident you don't have to add any more any time soon.
Just make sure you run an OS that can support the extra memory such as a 64bit version of Windows or Linux.

So i would say that about 100$ extra ( 20 bucks MB, 20 bucks CPU, 60 bucks video card ) to what you initial list shows will give you a good amount of future proofing and a much better experience overall having the use of a discrete GPU.
Share
July 23, 2011 1:46:48 AM

Best answer selected by jeffjeff666.
m
0
l
!