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Will these things fit and work well together?

Last response: in Systems
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June 11, 2011 2:49:00 AM

I'm getting close to ordering the parts for my new computer, but this is my first time, and I just wanted to check with some more experienced people before I took the plunge. I've done a good amount of my own research, but I still have some lingering questions:

1. Will the PSU fit in this case? How do I tell if the dimensions aren't listed?

2. I think the PSU has enough connectors for my mobo, video card, hard drive, and optical drive. Is there anything else that I'm missing?

3. Is this enough power?

4. I will use this computer for gaming. However, I am not a huge gamer, so it'll probably just be a little bit here and there. Do I need to worry about cooling?

SAMSUNG CD/DVD Burner Black SATA Model SH-222AB - OEM
APEX TX-381-C Black Steel Micro ATX Tower Computer Case
Recertified: Western Digital Caviar Blue WD3200AAKS 320GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
HIS H687F1G2M Radeon HD 6870 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity
Patriot Signature 4GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10600) Desktop Memory Model PSD34G13332
Open Box: ASRock H61M-VS LGA 1155 Intel H61 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard
Intel Core i5-2400 Sandy Bridge 3.1GHz (3.4GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I52400

I gave myself two choices for the PSU depending on if I want another SATA connector so I can put another hard drive in there.
For one hard drive: LOGISYS Computer PS575XBK 575W ATX12V SLI Ready Power Supply
For two hard drives: ePOWER EP-600NE-XV 600W ATX12V v2.2 / ESP12V v2.92 Power Supply - OEM

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June 11, 2011 3:21:22 AM

Pretty much any computer case that accepts an ATX/micro-ATX motherboard will also accept an ATX12V power supply. It's pretty much the standard. However, I don't like either of your selections for a power supply. The power supply is probably the most important component in any computer. If it goes, it may take the rest of your system with it. Therefore, you should always look for a power supply from a trusted manufacturer; those being, Antec, Corsair, PC Power and Cooling, or Seasonic. Yes, they cost more, but would you rather spend more now and get a quality PSU or a lot more later replacing destroyed parts (and getting a quality PSU)?

You state that you're not a huge gamer so drop down to an HD6770 and put the cash saved on the graphics card into a better power supply.

Recertified Components: I tend to stay away from them. Essentially, it means someone purchased the item and had an issue. The item was returned and tested (not necessarily to your specifications). It passed the manufacturer's test and was sent to be re-sold.

Open Box Components: I stay away from these even more than recertified components; particularly with motherboards. The last thing you want is to get an open-box motherboard only to find out it's missing some items (SATA cables and/or an I/O shield).

I'm guessing you're on a strict budget, and it's up to you if you want to take the risk of ordering recertified/open-box items, but personally, I wouldn't.

-Wolf sends
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June 11, 2011 3:35:42 AM

do yourself a favor and dont go cheap on the PSU. Both of those PSUs have tons of reviews where it has failed. A cheap PSU like that can kill other parts in your system too. Get a trusted brand such as antec, corsair or xfx and make sure it has fairly good reviews.

If you are not a huge gamer, then you dont need such a powerful card video card. You can save some money getting a radeon 6850 or gtx 460.

Also if you dont need a micro atx case then you might not want to get one. Things will be tightly packed and some compnents will run hot. You can be sure a larger case will fit everything and keep things cooler.

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June 11, 2011 8:27:00 PM

Thanks for the responses, guys! I've made a new list without recertified or open-box items. I've also chosen an Antec power supply now. I'm the type of person who uses the same computer for up to five years, so that's why I chose the video card that I did. I left it the same while I think about if I want to get something cheaper. Now I have some new questions:

1. Will 520W PSU be enough? (The only upgrade that I would potentially do for this system is adding another 4gb memory stick.)

2. The reviewers of the mobo mentioned that it doesn't have a PCI slot. I don't need to worry about this, because my video card uses PCIe, right?

3. I'm choosing a small case, because I plan to move twice in the next 12 months. I know it's going to be more prone to overheating, but how big of a problem do you guys think this will be? Would you say it is unlikely, moderately likely, likely, or certain to be a problem.

4. If my computer does begin overheating, what are the consequences? I know for my laptop, it starts to run way slower, which is annoying. But what about for desktops? Do the components break?

SAMSUNG CD/DVD Burner Black SATA Model SH-222AB - OEM
APEX TX-381-C Black Steel Micro ATX Tower Computer Case
Western Digital Caviar Blue WD5000AAKS 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
HIS H687F1G2M Radeon HD 6870 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity
Antec NEO ECO 520C 520W Continuous Power ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC Power Supply
Patriot Signature 4GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10600) Desktop Memory Model PSD34G13332
ASRock H61M-VS LGA 1155 Intel H61 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard
Intel Core i5-2400 Sandy Bridge 3.1GHz (3.4GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I52400
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June 11, 2011 10:38:00 PM

1. Yes, the 6870 needs 500w minimum

2. Right again. Only sound cards or netowrks cards use PCI slots

3. Reading some reviews of the case, i would say you dont have to worry about it. If you plan to overclock at all then you might want to add a aftermarket heatsink.

4. Only at very high temperatures ( 90 C for intel CPUs, 100c + for GPUs) components will shut your computer off to prevent the parts from melting. I doubt you will need to worry about this, but be sure to monitor temperatures with a program such as coretemp or CPUID hwmonitor
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June 11, 2011 10:50:27 PM

Also most memory these days is dual channel, so having 2x2GB instead of 1x4GB will give you a performance boost.

So i would say that if you really think you need 8GB at some point down the road, spend the extra 35 bucks and get the 2nd memory stick now.
However if you think that 4GB will be enough for you go for 2x2GB kit, it will cost a couple of more bucks but will double the memory bandwidth.
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June 11, 2011 11:28:31 PM

I agree with what both attackllama and rvilkman say. I would only add that you may want to consider adding a front 120mm fan. The specs for your case state you have room for it, so I'd look at adding something like this front intake fan to add in cooling your system.

-Wolf sends
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June 12, 2011 7:03:47 PM

Thanks for all the responses, guys! I'll be ordering these parts this week.
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June 12, 2011 7:04:06 PM

Best answer selected by Victoriousness.
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