Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

New build, replacing old comp.

Last response: in Systems
Share
June 11, 2011 5:41:40 AM

approx. purch. date : this month .
Budget range : i would say 500 - 800 . But ideally, the lower the better.
System usage from most to least important: Gaming mostly, surfing the internet, watching movies.
Parts not required: Power supply ( 650w tx. corsair )
monitor.
keyboard, mouse, speakers. OS.
preferred website: newegg, but suggest at will
country of origin : USA
parts preferences: intel cpu . i would like to try the antec kuhler H20 liquid cooling, but I doubt that'd be needed lol .
overclocking : maybe
sli or crossfire: no
monitor reso: not sure. I believe it's 1440 x 900. ( 23.6 inch screen ) .



additional comments : I would like a quiet, cool ( temp ) pc. My desktop that was running before it crashed overheated easily, which was very frustrating to manage.

Intel Core i5-2400 Sandy Bridge 3.1GHz (3.4GHz Turbo Boost) 4 x 256KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I52400

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I spotted this processor from a bare bones kit, and although I don't know much about the best processors and all, it seems like a fast, yet not extremely expensive processor.


Let me know what you think, and I thank you all for your help.

More about : build replacing comp

June 11, 2011 8:45:02 PM

Alrighty! Thanks for starting the thread. I have the perfect build for you.


http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite... $305 i5-2400 plus gigabyte Z68

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $46 1600Mhz Ripjaws 4GB

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $60 (50 at Tigerdirect) haf 912


HDD: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB ($60 at amazon)

DVD burner: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $20

That brings you to about $550! Add in a sweet GFX card: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... Brings you to roughly $700 shipped :) 

If you want a bit more GPU horsepower, the 6950 is AWESOME: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

And that's it! Hopefully that helps.

m
0
l
June 12, 2011 2:04:02 AM

That's amazingly helpful.

I honestly would have sleepless nights trying to do research on what part would be the smoothest yet inexpensive, while you just gave me a whole list.

Would it be a hassle to ask your justification ? I would like to know your mindset on what to look for / choose while building.
m
0
l
Related resources
June 12, 2011 2:36:54 AM

Alright, no issues. I know it's kind of hard to figure out why I picked what with just a blank build.

-For the CPU, I picked it partially because you specifically called it out, and because it's an excellent value. It provides the power of the insanely popular 2500k, but drops the price $35. It loses the OC ability, but it's still an amazingly powerful CPU.

-The Ripjaws ram combine 4 things. Cool looks, incredible value and quality, and awesome speed. They run at 1600MHz, which has been the standard for high end builds for quite a while. Despite what some people may say, 4GB is plenty; I hardcore game and rearely ever see my ram usage go above 3GB, even with many windows open.

-The HAF 912 and Antec 300 are awesome. No two ways about it. They provide plenty of space to build in, and are made with very high quality components. The antec 300 Illusion is on sale, so if you like LED's go ahead and buy it RIGHT NOW. It's $15 off!

-The HDD is the fastest/cheapest in it's class. You could go anywhere on the forum with any pricepoint and every right minded individual would recommend this drive.

-DVD burner. It's a DVD burner. Nuff said.

-and ahh, the GPU's. I suggested the GPU's because they both got the Tom's best value nod. They provide incredible performance at a low price. Both are good buys, whichever you can fit in your budget is good.

Yeah, that's pretty much it. If you have any more questions, please ask. We want you to get the best system for your money.
m
0
l
June 12, 2011 3:05:12 AM

oo. I've always read nvidia was a better company, as i didn't really see a justification.

for HDDs, Is it that the more " cache" there is, the better ?

m
0
l
June 12, 2011 3:12:37 AM

Well some say nVidia is better, but nowadays that's not the case.

And for HDD's the short answer is no. It will help slightly when moving large files, but not enough to take it into account when purchasing.
m
0
l
June 12, 2011 4:14:03 AM

Alright. Would the stock processor fan be more than enough to keep the computer at a good temp?
m
0
l
June 12, 2011 4:20:39 AM

With a 2400? For sure. Now worries about cooling. The Sandy Bridge series runs very cool, and you can't OC a 2400. I kinda wish you could, but Intel won't be like AMD and let you do whatever the hell you want. only the "K" chips can be OCed to anything that's actually worth it.
m
0
l
June 12, 2011 4:32:42 AM

I'm glad to hear that lol.

I would like to properly install all the parts, but it's mainly the processor I'm afraid of. How should I do it so that I don't screw up the chips on the bottom ? ( my friend was trying to install a processor, only to somehow allow small chips fall off )

I've also seen in videos people using the anti-static wrist kind of thing, but while putting ram in and gfx cards, I haven't seen a need for it. Is it that I've been very lucky in not getting shocked?
m
0
l
June 12, 2011 4:40:07 AM

Not sure what chips you are talking about.... If you are referring to bending pins, you shouldn't have an issue. Nowadays, there is no force required. If it doesn't drop in, you are doing it wrong.

And as for anti static wristband, it's a good precaution but I never do it. What I do is install the PSU first thing, then plug it in but don't flip the switch. This grounds the entire case (assuming it's metal) and allows you to ground yourself periodically by touching the case. as long as you aren't sliding around with socks on carpet while building this thing, you should be OK.

Here's an excellent guide that covers assembly. http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/274745-31-step-step-g... I recently just used it to help my buddy build his PC. It's always good to double check, even if you think you know what you are doing.

Honestly, the hardest thing about building a PC is picking the parts (athough wiring up the motherboard gives it a run for it's money). It's easy as cake once you get past that.
m
0
l
June 12, 2011 5:12:16 AM

i didnt know how to explain it, it was an amd dual core, like little golden boxes on the bottom . I m sure theres a technical term for it, but I am too lazy to search for it.

Thanks for the link, I will be sure to use it when I am assembling the pc.

Thank you for your help in general as well. I will be sure to ask you or the community if I need help
m
0
l
July 15, 2011 11:20:32 PM

edited with more info
m
0
l
!