Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

HDD makes clicking noise with HD Radeon 5770.

Last response: in Components
Share
September 6, 2011 10:41:18 AM

I pin pointed the noise, it's coming from the HDD. My graphics card makes the HDD click, and when it's clicking it clicks for 30 seconds then boots up going through bios and normal start up procedure.But it doesn't click when i remove the graphics card and use onboard graphics.So I did a test I thought the HDD wasn't getting power first (because the GFX card has two power connectors) so I didn't use the one that powered the HDD unpluged the power from the CD-ROM drive and used the CD-ROM and the spare one, still that mysterious ticking noise continued XD.

I have the AMD Athlon x2 2.8 ghz, 2gb DDR2 kingston RAM, M61PME-S2 mobo and 550 watt power suply.
Clicks go as follows: Click, click 1 second pause, Click, click 1 second pause... It does that for 30 seconds then boots up.
September 6, 2011 11:40:47 AM

Is the drive either a Western Digital or Maxtor? I still think you having a power consumption issue, wether you using a single or double 6 pin ATX you are still using a high power draw. My best recommendation would be to take you system to your local IT store and ask hem to quickly fit a higher wattaged PSU and see what happens.

Taken from Wikipedia:

6-pin Most modern computer power supplies include 6-pin connectors which are generally used for PCI Express graphics cards, but a newly introduced 8-pin connector should be seen on the latest model power supplies. Each PCI Express 6-pin connector can output a maximum of 75 W.

This might help a bit, maybe try change your ata transfer cable (sata or IDE cable)
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
September 7, 2011 4:05:29 AM

It sounds like your PSU isn't up to the task, and the hard drive is starving for enough power to function properly. If voltage sags or dips, hard drives will sometimes reinitalize.
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 144 ) Power supply
a b U Graphics card
September 7, 2011 4:37:23 AM

Pilk said:

Taken from Wikipedia:
6-pin Most modern computer power supplies include 6-pin connectors which are generally used for PCI Express graphics cards, but a newly introduced 8-pin connector should be seen on the latest model power supplies. Each PCI Express 6-pin connector can output a maximum of 75 W.

Standard conventions are that a 6 pin connector is good for 75 watts and an 8 pin connector is good for 150 watts. I do not believe that.

A 6 pin connector has 3 hot (12 volt yellow) wires and 3 ground (black) wires. An 8 pin connector has 2 extra ground wires (3 hot and 5 ground). Now, I have been doing this for a while: military computers and radars for 35 years, military communications for 45 years, and hobby electronics for nearly 55 years. So can someone who knows more than I do (lots of people :) ) please explain to me how adding 2 extra ground wires can double the power capacity of a cable.

I agree with mavroxur. The PSU is the first place I would look.
m
0
l
September 7, 2011 5:43:24 AM

Thanks for your replies.
It's a bit anoying I have exactly the same power suply in a diferent computer and the same GFX works fine.
m
0
l
September 7, 2011 6:18:49 AM

JSC is right they are only grounded power cables linking to the PSU, surely shouldn't double.

JSC has seen this answer before this is also all i can assume it makes the most sense as nowhere on the net can you find anything regarding the extra 2 ground cables LOL. Looks like a lost cause, we need the rite answer for this it is bugging me =)


Taken from JohnLucky from toms hardware:

The original 6 pin, 75 watt specification was for a minimum current of 2.08 amps for each +12 volt line, hence 75 watts.

3 +12 volt lines x 2.08 amps each = 75 watts.

However, The 6 pin PCI-e power connector is actually capable of handling more than 75 watts.

3 +12 volt wires x 4.16 amps each = 150 watts maximum wattage.

The two black ground wires were added to handle the increased current

JSC we must solve this. )
m
0
l
September 7, 2011 6:27:10 AM

Just a quick touch on that when it comes to entry level power supplies, no power supply is the same they will output within the same region but never at the exact rate of power output of each other, similar to sca-electric motors, they built in the same factory but not one is identical to the next, i think this has something to do with the electrical coiling system. Try change the power supply into that other chassis, couldn't hurt to try, as i still think its the PSU.
m
0
l
September 7, 2011 6:36:24 AM

Sigh,
I swapped around a HDD and disconnected the other one. The one I put in, was sitting on top of the mounts for the CD-ROM and the ticking noise wasnt coming from the HDD it was comimg from the front pannel power on and usb ports. Right in front of where the usual HDD was sitting. I feel so dumb :( 
m
0
l
September 7, 2011 8:09:41 AM

I still have no clue what to do or who to fix it.
m
0
l
September 7, 2011 10:15:31 AM

ok so you are saying that there is a front mounted speaker thats making that noise and not the HDD?
m
0
l
September 7, 2011 10:52:09 AM

I'm pretty sure it's not a speaker, it sounds mechanical not beep like. It sounds like clicking your thumbs but quieter. Maby I'll reord a video and put a link up.
m
0
l
September 7, 2011 3:40:23 PM

And not the optical disk drive either?
m
0
l
September 8, 2011 7:45:23 AM

It's not coming from optical drive either. I might be upploading the video tonight but It will definitly be on youtube tomorow.
m
0
l
September 8, 2011 9:44:50 AM

Awesome please post link that would be fantastic.
m
0
l
September 10, 2011 2:03:55 AM

Sorry I forgot to post yesterday but the problem is gone :D 
I don't know how or why but it's working fine!
m
0
l
September 10, 2011 5:20:52 AM

Change the PSU. That's all have to say.
m
0
l
September 10, 2011 8:26:45 AM

Awesome Apansy glad you got it all solved, please done hesitate to shout should you need anything further =)
m
0
l
!