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How about this combo for 3D video editing?

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June 16, 2011 12:23:07 AM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboBundleDetails.aspx?I...
I plan to do editing of 3d videos using Sony vegas 10 pro, not full time prodution work. Most will be short, less than 20 minutes with minimal special effects. I need to burn videos to DVD and BluRay.
I also want to be able to drive a future 3d monitor or my 3d TV (Panasonic Viera VT25.)
I would expect to get another fast HDD. Recommendatiions?
Are there any gotchas in this package?
Do I need more RAM, cooling?
Should I overclock?
Anything additional that is "must have"?
Thanks

More about : combo video editing

June 16, 2011 3:57:07 PM

Does that combo deal include an operative system??

That should do 3D as I believe most of the Nvidia cards support 3d and HDMI 1.4. The GTX570 should be no exception!

RAM should be sufficient for the moment!

For another HDD ... A simple Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB or 2TB should do. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136533

cooling should do ... Sandy Bridge runs pretty cool!
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July 2, 2011 10:26:15 PM

I have been researching and investing in a 3-D Video System Build. It's been an informative process. I've spent thousands so far. I might be taking some stuff back to the store because this 3-D editing area is not clear yet. It's all still being figured out industry-wise. I don't want to custom-build my system to match the camera I am currently using, which is MVC file format, because that might change down the road as soon as a few months from now.

Are you setting yourself up to shoot/edit for YouTube on 3D? If so, I believe the top two 3D cameras are the ones by Sony and JVC which run under $2k. They have two lenses and shoot one file format. The Sony shoots an MVC format. The only other one is a Panasonic which goes for $21k. Sony is coming out with a few 3D Production cameras in the $5k range, supposedly. Both are file-based, MVC and the more expensive one SxS cards (left/right).

Although Sony Vegas Professional 10 offers the only native ingestion out there, I've heard professionals don't go there. I would definitely entertain using it because it will be cheaper in the short run to edit 3-D videos for YouTube. As for getting broadcast quality acceptable video and Blu-Ray/DVDs produced, that might require a $5k+ production monitor that has the brains to color correct or you can get rejected by the buyer of the video product. Otherwise, if you color correct off the computer monitor, it could be inaccurate and rejectable. You can get away with it for YouTube, for now. I do know that producers often search for good content on-line there. You never know if someone will offer to buy it from you other than the many that try to get it for free.

You must decide if you are a hobbyist, a YouTube Program Participate to earn money with Google Adsense, or if you really want to take it to the next level to make money being able to deliver video content to emerging 3-D broadcast channels (perhaps even on-line ones) and producing content for Blu-ray/DVD too. THAT will determine your system.

The other option, 3-D-editing-wise other than Sony Vegas Pro 10 and Sony Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum 11, is the more expensive but more standard Adobe route. You basically have to spend a lot more money to do it and it would put you through at least three conversions to start editing:

- Prosumer or Professional 3-D Video Card
- Adobe Production Suite
- Cineform Neo 3D (or less features on HD) Plugin
- Prosumer or Professional 3-D Capture Card
- MVC to AVI convertor third party software
- RAID array (for storage of large uncompressed HD files to avoid dropped frames if professional delivery is in your future) that comes with your tower or buy one or two (scratch and storage)
- Fast CPU without integrated graphics, same with motherboard (see the videoguys' recommendation against I7s for NLE systems)
- Fast Boot drive (SSD or 10000RPM)
- Fast Scratch Drive/s (SSD is cost prohibitive, try 7200RPM or 10000RPM)
- Decently fast Storage Drives (5200 RPM or 7200RPM)
- CPU Water cooling helps (enclosed)
- Nicely cooled tower (check for noisiness)
- For real time preview: Production 3D Monitor to connect to Prosumer/Professional 3D Capture Card (if you care about color correcting for broadcast quality)
- For Storyline editing: Computer monitor 3D (a gaming one like Acer or Alienware) with nVidia 3D Vision Ready + Active Shutter Glasses
- Alternately: for storyline editing or real-time preview (if you don't need color correcting for broadcast quality) 3DTV HD LED 32"-42" but you must use nVIDIA 3DTVPlay software and the TV's manufacturer active or passive shutter glasses for this to work, but it's your preference how you want to edit on 3D, passive or active. Passive would give me a headache working on it too long, but maybe just for reference and then once settings are set, use the left eye to continue the editing process.

Note. I was considering buying the Matrox MXO2 with Max and before that, the Mini-Max, but then I discovered they don't yet offer 3-D features. They have a wonderful feature that turns a monitor into broadcast quality which is a wonderful asset if you're looking to save thousands on a production monitor. It only works on HD from what I've learned. Can't wait to see if they will make 3-D available!
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July 3, 2011 12:47:40 PM

While the Videoguys hit the mark on most things their, not recommending Sandybridge systems to be used in video editing without a factual explanation, damages their credibility immensely. I haven't heard of anyone have in any issues with the using a Sandybridge setup. here is their link to see for yourself. http://www.videoguys.com/Guide/E/Videoguys+System+recom...

Other than their Sandybridge hang up their advice is pretty solid. Things you want to add to the combo (which is very good quality stuff btw) you want to use the 1.5TB drive for storage and get a smaller fast drive (250-500GBs) or SSD (80-128Gbs) for the OS/APPS. you also want to set a drive for a Work "scratch" area. this should be a fast drive like a 450/600gb WD velociraptor or 2 to 3 x 250-500GB drives is Raid 0. these should be quality drives made for raid like the WD RE3 or RE4 or Seagate Constellation series drives.

The i7-2600k over clocks very easy and is stable up to about 4.3Ghz on air. so I don't think it will be a bad thing. I generally would not recommend any OC on a workstation. but for the SB's I would make an exception at least to 4Ghz.

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July 4, 2011 3:32:35 AM

Gina Blackhawk said:
I have been researching and investing in a 3-D Video System Build. It's been an informative process. I've spent thousands so far. I might be taking some stuff back to the store because this 3-D editing area is not clear yet. It's all still being figured out industry-wise. I don't want to custom-build my system to match the camera I am currently using, which is MVC file format, because that might change down the road as soon as a few months from now.

Are you setting yourself up to shoot/edit for YouTube on 3D? If so, I believe the top two 3D cameras are the ones by Sony and JVC which run under $2k. They have two lenses and shoot one file format. The Sony shoots an MVC format. The only other one is a Panasonic which goes for $21k. Sony is coming out with a few 3D Production cameras in the $5k range, supposedly. Both are file-based, MVC and the more expensive one SxS cards (left/right).

Although Sony Vegas Professional 10 offers the only native ingestion out there, I've heard professionals don't go there. I would definitely entertain using it because it will be cheaper in the short run to edit 3-D videos for YouTube. As for getting broadcast quality acceptable video and Blu-Ray/DVDs produced, that might require a $5k+ production monitor that has the brains to color correct or you can get rejected by the buyer of the video product. Otherwise, if you color correct off the computer monitor, it could be inaccurate and rejectable. You can get away with it for YouTube, for now. I do know that producers often search for good content on-line there. You never know if someone will offer to buy it from you other than the many that try to get it for free.

You must decide if you are a hobbyist, a YouTube Program Participate to earn money with Google Adsense, or if you really want to take it to the next level to make money being able to deliver video content to emerging 3-D broadcast channels (perhaps even on-line ones) and producing content for Blu-ray/DVD too. THAT will determine your system.

The other option, 3-D-editing-wise other than Sony Vegas Pro 10 and Sony Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum 11, is the more expensive but more standard Adobe route. You basically have to spend a lot more money to do it and it would put you through at least three conversions to start editing:

- Prosumer or Professional 3-D Video Card
- Adobe Production Suite
- Cineform Neo 3D (or less features on HD) Plugin
- Prosumer or Professional 3-D Capture Card
- MVC to AVI convertor third party software
- RAID array (for storage of large uncompressed HD files to avoid dropped frames if professional delivery is in your future) that comes with your tower or buy one or two (scratch and storage)
- Fast CPU without integrated graphics, same with motherboard (see the videoguys' recommendation against I7s for NLE systems)
- Fast Boot drive (SSD or 10000RPM)
- Fast Scratch Drive/s (SSD is cost prohibitive, try 7200RPM or 10000RPM)
- Decently fast Storage Drives (5200 RPM or 7200RPM)
- CPU Water cooling helps (enclosed)
- Nicely cooled tower (check for noisiness)
- For real time preview: Production 3D Monitor to connect to Prosumer/Professional 3D Capture Card (if you care about color correcting for broadcast quality)
- For Storyline editing: Computer monitor 3D (a gaming one like Acer or Alienware) with nVidia 3D Vision Ready + Active Shutter Glasses
- Alternately: for storyline editing or real-time preview (if you don't need color correcting for broadcast quality) 3DTV HD LED 32"-42" but you must use nVIDIA 3DTVPlay software and the TV's manufacturer active or passive shutter glasses for this to work, but it's your preference how you want to edit on 3D, passive or active. Passive would give me a headache working on it too long, but maybe just for reference and then once settings are set, use the left eye to continue the editing process.

Note. I was considering buying the Matrox MXO2 with Max and before that, the Mini-Max, but then I discovered they don't yet offer 3-D features. They have a wonderful feature that turns a monitor into broadcast quality which is a wonderful asset if you're looking to save thousands on a production monitor. It only works on HD from what I've learned. Can't wait to see if they will make 3-D available!


At the present time, I will be doing this as a hobbyist. I may do some commercial work if there turns out to be a market for it.
Right now I am using a Sony HDR-TD10 and a 3D GoPro pair. I am struggling to edit with Vegas Pro 10. My current system is too slow and I am just learning the software.
I did read the videoguys recommendations against i7s for NLE. I will not be using I/O hardware or a raid card so I thnk the Sandy Bridge processor may be a good choice for me.
Some have suggested that I get 12G of RAM. The kit at newegg only has 8. Can I just add another chip or should they be purchased as a matched set? I may not overclock to start with but I want to make sure that I have this option later. I read some where about interference on some boards with the memory and cooling system.
I am considering the new Acer 27" monitor for 3D. I already have several pairs of the 3D shutter glasses for my panasonic TV which should work with this monitor.
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July 4, 2011 6:22:47 AM

syotr said:
At the present time, I will be doing this as a hobbyist. I may do some commercial work if there turns out to be a market for it.
Right now I am using a Sony HDR-TD10 and a 3D GoPro pair. I am struggling to edit with Vegas Pro 10. My current system is too slow and I am just learning the software.
I did read the videoguys recommendations against i7s for NLE. I will not be using I/O hardware or a raid card so I thnk the Sandy Bridge processor may be a good choice for me.
Some have suggested that I get 12G of RAM. The kit at newegg only has 8. Can I just add another chip or should they be purchased as a matched set? I may not overclock to start with but I want to make sure that I have this option later. I read some where about interference on some boards with the memory and cooling system.
I am considering the new Acer 27" monitor for 3D. I already have several pairs of the 3D shutter glasses for my panasonic TV which should work with this monitor.


The Sandy bridge chipset is dual channel so its 4, 8, or 16 GB of ram. 8Gb should be fine, if you think you need more you can always drop another two 4gb sticks in. If its in your budget, just start out with 16gb. Ram is rather inexpensive right now. just make sure its DDR 1600 C9 or C8 will be fine.
Newegg is out right now, but this what I would get x 2
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

no help with the 3D monitors. sorry. I think 3d is a fad that will pass soon.
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