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Radeon 6850 vs GTX 460 1gb

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June 16, 2011 8:13:05 PM

Hi guys, I'm currently building a new computer. So far I've decided on the i3-2100 w/ mobo bundle deal from microcenter, 8 gb gskill ram (2x4gb), 1 tb western digital caviar blue hdd. I'm trying to decide which video card to purchase. The graphics hierarchy chart on Tom's states they're about even, and currently Amazon has the 6850 for 159.99 (149.99 AR) and the PNY oc'd gtx 460 1 gb for 169.99 (139.99 AR). I'm trying to decide which one is the better deal?

Also, does anybody know what kind of PSU I should get? I know this would probably require a ~550W psu, but I hear the higher quality ones can support the same amount even though they are rated at a lower wattage. I was thinking of the RaidMax 530W psu, but I hear not-so-good things about these. I don't want to overspend if I can help it because I'm on a budget, so I would like to buy the required amount and not too much more. I don't really plan on overclocking or sli/xfire-ing
June 16, 2011 8:23:30 PM

Get a corsair, antec, XFX or seasonic psu, they are reliable and will last you years. dont know on the gpu front :) 
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June 16, 2011 8:23:56 PM

They are about the same so go with the cheaper price plus if you ever go with 2 cards in the future the AMD card will scale better :) . A good 500w will be fine for that card but not for crossfire.
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June 16, 2011 8:31:21 PM

How do you guys feel about Cooler Master?
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June 16, 2011 8:34:46 PM

they make good cases but Get a corsair, antec, XFX or seasonic psu, they are reliable and will last you years.
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June 16, 2011 8:59:40 PM

You can in most cases google the model number and name of the PSU you are looking at and find a professional review. A review like that will tell you things like the tru max output and dependability and noise. For instance alot of really good PSU can in fact produce more power that is said on the box and it works the other way as well. A cheap 600w PSU may ony be good for 400-450w max befor it starts to get hot and fail or be on the edge of failing. All the brands that mobohobo listed are good but you can find good PSU's from other brands as well.
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June 16, 2011 9:27:37 PM

I'd say the 6850 since it uses less power and it's easier to add a second one later on since it only uses one PCI-E power connector. If you get a sufficient GPU with 4x PCi-E connectors then you may want to go with the 460 since it's cheaper ^_^.
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Best solution

June 16, 2011 9:41:30 PM

http://www.guru3d.com/article/radeon-hd-6850-6870-cross...
Considering that this review states that an entire system with two 6850s only uses ~400W at the wall. Taking efficiency into account and a worst case scenario of 350W actual system power draw, 350 is still only ~65% of a 550W units capacity, which is not going to be stressful to a good unit.
Also take into account that sunglee's power consumption is going to be lower than what was shown by Guru3D because the system they used had an i7-965 which is much more power hungry than an i3-2100. Also take into account that such a system would only draw ~350W under a furmark type load, obviously if you (sunglee) know that your system is going to be under that kind of load for extended periods of time then you probably should go for a higher wattage unit.
I know that Guru3D says to use a 650W PSU for 6850 crossfire, but I disagree with that conclusion based on everything I have just said.

Obviously the 550W PSU needs to be of high quality, and I'm not sure that the Raidmax one fits that bill, so I would recommend finding one whose quality is known.
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June 17, 2011 1:16:18 AM

I own a Ati Radeon 6850 from Gigabyte that i bought from MicroCenter in my area. Ive owned for less than 2 months and i love it. I bought it to replace my Gt430. I haven't had any problems with AMD/Ati graphic card drivers make sure to use the ones from the amd/ati website instead of disk that comes with the card
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June 17, 2011 3:23:01 AM

wildman78 said:
I own a Ati Radeon 6850 from Gigabyte that i bought from MicroCenter in my area. Ive owned for less than 2 months and i love it. I bought it to replace my Gt430. I haven't had any problems with AMD/Ati graphic card drivers make sure to use the ones from the amd/ati website instead of disk that comes with the card




I'm very glad you haven't had any ATI driver bugs. Now you have something to look forward to.
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June 17, 2011 3:26:12 AM

sunglee2 said:
so if I don't plan on going the oc/sli route, will this psu be viable?:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004W2T2TM/ref=ox_sc_a...

it's a corsair builder series cx v2 430W psu



I never want to run any PSU at over 50% of it's rating. Think of the extra money you spend on the PSU as an insurance policy but remember there are crappy PSUs in all sizes.
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June 17, 2011 3:42:01 PM

ram1009 said:
I'm very glad you haven't had any ATI driver bugs. Now you have something to look forward to.

It could be possible that after AMD purchase ATI they made a point to have as few bugs as possible. I have a Msi 6950 and have also had no problems. I think Nvidia fans keep bringing that up because they are upset that AMD cards now scale better in 2-3 card setups lol.
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June 17, 2011 3:44:39 PM

ram1009 said:
I never want to run any PSU at over 50% of it's rating. Think of the extra money you spend on the PSU as an insurance policy but remember there are crappy PSUs in all sizes.

You sound like a PSU salesman lol. The reason to spend good money on a PSU is so that you can run it at more than half its rating. A good PSU will be able to run more than what it says on the box and a good corsair can run at 80% no prob. To manny people get cheap PSU and have trouble but also there are lots of people spending way to much on a PSU they dont need.
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June 17, 2011 8:15:37 PM

cburke82 said:
It could be possible that after AMD purchase ATI they made a point to have as few bugs as possible. I have a Msi 6950 and have also had no problems. I think Nvidia fans keep bringing that up because they are upset that AMD cards now scale better in 2-3 card setups lol.



I quit buying ATI cards years ago because of buggy drivers. I decided to give them another try last year and found their drivers as buggy as ever. I have no reason to be partial to Nvidia except that they perform better for me and I only use them one at a time. I actually look forward to the day when I, and many others, consider their competitive. Competition helps everyone.
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June 17, 2011 8:24:16 PM

cburke82 said:
You sound like a PSU salesman lol. The reason to spend good money on a PSU is so that you can run it at more than half its rating. A good PSU will be able to run more than what it says on the box and a good corsair can run at 80% no prob. To manny people get cheap PSU and have trouble but also there are lots of people spending way to much on a PSU they dont need.



Well, I don't sell PSUs or anything else, but I do design commercial products that use power supplies. I never said you can't run a power supply above 50% I just said I'd never do it and I'd never design a product that would either. You may very well get away with it for a while but I guarantee a PSU running at 50% will last longer than one running at 80%. For my money, it's the cheapest insurance policy anybody can buy for the machine.
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June 17, 2011 9:28:09 PM

The GeForce 400 series cards were rushed out the door by nVidia and were quickly replaced by the 500 series cards after 3 months. For whatever reason the 460 1gb still remains viable, although I think nVidia would prefer people buy their 560ti. T problem is that the 460's suck up a lot of juice and produce a lot more heat then the 500 series, along with some other poor design choices.

As for your power supply: you'll be safe with an Antec EarthWatts 380W.

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June 17, 2011 10:26:51 PM

grody said:
The GeForce 400 series cards were rushed out the door by nVidia and were quickly replaced by the 500 series cards after 3 months. For whatever reason the 460 1gb still remains viable, although I think nVidia would prefer people buy their 560ti. T problem is that the 460's suck up a lot of juice and produce a lot more heat then the 500 series, along with some other poor design choices.

As for your power supply: you'll be safe with an Antec EarthWatts 380W.



One of our major failings as a species is our inability to learn from each other's mistakes especially our elders. We all prefer to make our own mistakes and I'm no exception. Have a nice life.
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June 18, 2011 10:38:19 AM

ram1009 said:
You may very well get away with it for a while but I guarantee a PSU running at 50% will last longer than one running at 80%.

Yes you are right about this, but just because you use a PSU at 80% doesn't necessarily mean that it will stop working before it's useful lifetime is over. And then there are degrees; using a PSU at 80% for say an hour a day isn't going to be that stressful, but using a PSU at 80% for five hours a day 7 days a week would definitely be stressful, even to a good, well built PSU.

As for AMD having buggy graphics drivers, if they do then they are not in isolation. Intel and Nvidia both have problems with their drivers from time to time.
I wonder how many people on these forums have bought AMD graphics cards in the past year, how many of them have reported back about problems with their drivers? I know I haven't seen any, but that is probably because I have not looked, but they also haven't jumped out at me.
You may not consider them competitive, but many others do.

Frankly I think alot of what you've said in this thread is theoretical, especially in regards to sunglee's question about PSU, you haven't told him what size of PSU he should get.
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June 18, 2011 2:41:57 PM

Silvune said:
Yes you are right about this, but just because you use a PSU at 80% doesn't necessarily mean that it will stop working before it's useful lifetime is over. And then there are degrees; using a PSU at 80% for say an hour a day isn't going to be that stressful, but using a PSU at 80% for five hours a day 7 days a week would definitely be stressful, even to a good, well built PSU. You're splitting hairs, IMHO. There are no absolutes when talking about the lifespan of electronic components. The best you can do is improve the odds. I've said many times on this board that using an oversize PSU is an insurance policy and a cheap one at that.

As for AMD having buggy graphics drivers, if they do then they are not in isolation. Intel and Nvidia both have problems with their drivers from time to time. Everybody has buggy drivers occasionally. ATI's problems are the rule rather than the exception, IMHO.
I wonder how many people on these forums have bought AMD graphics cards in the past year, how many of them have reported back about problems with their drivers? I know I haven't seen any, but that is probably because I have not looked, but they also haven't jumped out at me. I doubt everybody on this forum runs to their computer to report every anomaly. I certainly don't. Over the years I've read of MANY driver problems on ATI boards and my personal experience mirrors those reports. To me the difference (when compared to Nvidia) is night & day.
You may not consider them competitive, but many others do. I'm sure you're right.
Would you prefer I keep my opinions to myself?


Frankly I think alot of what you've said in this thread is theoretical, especially in regards to sunglee's question about PSU, you haven't told him what size of PSU he should get.Nor will I. I have neither the time nor inclination to select individual components for individual board members. Perhaps you do. Since I don't, I have provided some guidelines that I would use to select my own components. If you wish to call that theoretical it's OK with me. Frankly, the whole tone of your response seems to be telling me I should mind my own business and keep my opinions to myself. I doubt the staff or members would agree.

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June 18, 2011 4:20:36 PM

I just disagree with a lot of your opinions, so I was sharing my opinions on the matters you raised.
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Anonymous
June 18, 2011 4:36:20 PM

The 6850 of course, why did Tom's Hardware choose it over the GTX 460 in the "Best Graphics Cards for the Money" thing and for the $500 build.

No need to complicate things, the 6850 gives slightly better scaling, less power use and multi-display support, and FYI I'm actually an Nvidia fanboy, I choose Nvidia when the cards are exactly the same on average, but here AMD wins. The AMD drivers for the 6 series aren't screwed up, forget the past.

As for the power supply, the Antec Earthwatts 380w (which costs $40) is just enough to power a 6850 and a 95w processor- As shown in the Tom's Hardware $500 budget build. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/budget-gaming-pc-ph...


Also the i3-2100 is a 65w processor so the 380w Earthwatts green should be fine. But if you crossfire, or upgrade other parts, you will have to upgrade the PSU, but that's not a problem since it's only $40.

You should just get this build-

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/budget-gaming-pc-ph...

EXCEPT get the i3-2100 with a motherboard of your choice instead of the AMD processor.
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June 18, 2011 5:41:38 PM

Silvune said:
I just disagree with a lot of your opinions, so I was sharing my opinions on the matters you raised.



Well, I'm sure we both know what's often said about opinions. Whatever our divergent opinions are I don't think this person's thread is the place to compare them. As you now see there's always someone around who knows exactly how to answer every question.
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June 19, 2011 3:58:27 AM

grody said:
The GeForce 400 series cards were rushed out the door by nVidia and were quickly replaced by the 500 series cards after 3 months. For whatever reason the 460 1gb still remains viable, although I think nVidia would prefer people buy their 560ti. T problem is that the 460's suck up a lot of juice and produce a lot more heat then the 500 series, along with some other poor design choices.

As for your power supply: you'll be safe with an Antec EarthWatts 380W.



Actually the 460 had a good number of corrections over the GF 100 (480/470/465) to raise yields. The main reason it shipped with one cluster disabled and relatively low clocks was so that it didn't get too close to the GTX 470. The GTX 560 Ti is essentially the same card but revised to more reliably hit higher clock speeds and better yields. The GF110 (580/570) required a bit more work over the GF100 but is essentially how the GF100 should have been done the first time around.

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June 19, 2011 4:04:10 PM

megamanx00 said:
Actually the 460 had a good number of corrections over the GF 100 (480/470/465) to raise yields.

Ah, that explains it. I don't understand why nVidia would make the 460 an upgrade from the 465 though. Deliberately confusing consumers ftl.
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June 19, 2011 4:10:31 PM

what really irks me is introducing the gtx 560 AFTER the superior gtx 560 ti. Since there was no regular gtx 560 when the TI first came out, everyone was casually just calling it the gtx 560. deceptive marketing, imo.
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June 19, 2011 5:34:56 PM

genghiskron said:
what really irks me is introducing the gtx 560 AFTER the superior gtx 560 ti. Since there was no regular gtx 560 when the TI first came out, everyone was casually just calling it the gtx 560. deceptive marketing, imo.



You forget that their goal is to maximize profit. Everything else is secondary.
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Anonymous
June 29, 2011 6:11:15 PM

Why do you guys get into arguments and make big deals out of everything,
I don't find a reason to get the GTX 460. Just get the HD 6850.
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Anonymous
June 29, 2011 6:24:53 PM

There are other areas where the 6850 is better, such as EYEFINITY, where as the GTX 460 only supports 2 displays, and there is also power usage and crossfire scaling, I value those more than the overclocking the capability. But the the OP can get what ever he wants, I feel that the GTX 460 is sorta old, it really wont make a difference at the end, so he will have to choose based on our opinions.
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June 29, 2011 6:40:20 PM

Best answer selected by sunglee2.
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June 29, 2011 7:05:23 PM

Thanks guys! This thread has been very helpful. I decided to go with a EVGA GTX 460 1GB, mainly because it was on sale. After rebate, it came out to $140. One question, for those with experience with EVGA cards, what program can I use to check the card's clock speed? Does one of the utilities that came packaged with this card do that?
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June 29, 2011 7:34:01 PM

Quote:
There are other areas where the 6850 is better, such as EYEFINITY, where as the GTX 460 only supports 2 displays, and there is also power usage and crossfire scaling, I value those more than the overclocking the capability. But the the OP can get what ever he wants, I feel that the GTX 460 is sorta old, it really wont make a difference at the end, so he will have to choose based on our opinions.

By your argument the HD 6850 is also old. The biggest difference is usually the 460 is significantly cheaper. Power consumption is about the same at max load which is what is important.

They have the same performance in dual GPU configuration http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/302?vs=314
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June 29, 2011 8:02:54 PM

sunglee2 said:
Thanks guys! This thread has been very helpful. I decided to go with a EVGA GTX 460 1GB, mainly because it was on sale. After rebate, it came out to $140. One question, for those with experience with EVGA cards, what program can I use to check the card's clock speed? Does one of the utilities that came packaged with this card do that?

MSI Afterburner seems to be all the rage these days.
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Anonymous
September 12, 2011 3:20:39 PM

And GPUZ to double check
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September 12, 2011 3:39:29 PM

Quote:
There are other areas where the 6850 is better, such as EYEFINITY, where as the GTX 460 only supports 2 displays, and there is also power usage and crossfire scaling, I value those more than the overclocking the capability. But the the OP can get what ever he wants, I feel that the GTX 460 is sorta old, it really wont make a difference at the end, so he will have to choose based on our opinions.



Your opinions are welcomed by everybody as long as they remain opinions. When you tell people to stop debating and buy what you say you lose credibility.
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