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Woot! 4.2Ghz stable, push any further tips!?!

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September 16, 2011 11:50:08 AM

Hello community,


I'm super stoked i just hit 4.2 Ghz on my phenom II x4 965 BE. The only settings I changed are the following:

voltage 1.425 stock ----> 1.5
multiplier -----> 21x
temps = 38C idle and 58 load (torture testing)


I'm looking to maybe mess around more , what should I do???? Given that my ram is 4 sticks G.Skill DDR2 800, Maybe me OC will benefit from better RAM timings??? I'm not too sure, the more I read about OC'ing RAM the less sure I am on what to do
September 16, 2011 1:12:52 PM

yeh put ur cpu voltage to 10.112 and you shud hit at least 11ghz on air running prime 95 for 2 years stable. AT LEAST
a b à CPUs
September 16, 2011 1:27:46 PM

I don't see any point in going any further.

Overclocking your ram will not give you any benefit, keep it at 800mhz.
Related resources
a c 96 à CPUs
September 16, 2011 1:46:36 PM

highc1157 said:
Hello community,


I'm super stoked i just hit 4.2 Ghz on my phenom II x4 965 BE. The only settings I changed are the following:

voltage 1.425 stock ----> 1.5
multiplier -----> 21x
temps = 38C idle and 58 load (torture testing)


I'm looking to maybe mess around more , what should I do???? Given that my ram is 4 sticks G.Skill DDR2 800, Maybe me OC will benefit from better RAM timings??? I'm not too sure, the more I read about OC'ing RAM the less sure I am on what to do


Congrats. Looks like you got a nice chip.

You could lower your volts in 0.0125v increments and check for stability while maintaining your speeds.

You may also clock-up the IMC/NB by working the multiplier. 2400MHz at stock NB volts would not be uncommon. Enthusiasts are blowing past 3000MHz. I don't really like to take the NB volts above 1.25v but some folks go higher.

For each 10% you increase the IMC/NB, memory bandwidth is increased 3-4% and latency is reduced 3-4%. 2600-2700MHz seems to be the sweet spot with diminishing returns beyond that point.

Without knowing your specific motherboard and RAMs it is hard to go beyond that. Using CPUz you may determine the stock SPD settings -- I would suggest little tinkering until you understand the implications to your system stability and operation.

I'd be interested in seeing some benchie info on your RAMs to compare with those in similar systems at higher memory speeds -- here is a link to Sisoft Sandra which is a handy tool for comparing systems.

Don't mess around and screw things up :lol: 


September 16, 2011 7:14:30 PM

Wisecracker said:
Congrats. Looks like you got a nice chip.

You could lower your volts in 0.0125v increments and check for stability while maintaining your speeds.

You may also clock-up the IMC/NB by working the multiplier. 2400MHz at stock NB volts would not be uncommon. Enthusiasts are blowing past 3000MHz. I don't really like to take the NB volts above 1.25v but some folks go higher.

For each 10% you increase the IMC/NB, memory bandwidth is increased 3-4% and latency is reduced 3-4%. 2600-2700MHz seems to be the sweet spot with diminishing returns beyond that point.

Without knowing your specific motherboard and RAMs it is hard to go beyond that. Using CPUz you may determine the stock SPD settings -- I would suggest little tinkering until you understand the implications to your system stability and operation.

I'd be interested in seeing some benchie info on your RAMs to compare with those in similar systems at higher memory speeds -- here is a link to Sisoft Sandra which is a handy tool for comparing systems.

Don't mess around and screw things up :lol: 



THanks for the lengthy reply, helped me understand some more, and I'll look into the bench stuff too in a bit.


I just upped the NB to 2200 Mhz (2400 was unstable stock volts (BSOD :(  ); however, 2200 stock was stable).

I left my CPU VID to 1.5 , 4.2Ghz with only 21x multiplier. Btw I am water cooling on a new cosair hydro h60.

My idle temps with this current setup are 37-41C, is that too hot for 24/7??

If i up the voltage of the NB to try to test again at 2400, is that worth the performance gain for the extra volts?

Im wondering if say I up the NB volts to +.025, and test
a b à CPUs
September 16, 2011 7:15:56 PM

That's a surprisingly hot idle. Does it stay under 50-60C @ 100%?
September 16, 2011 7:24:46 PM

FinneousPJ said:
That's a surprisingly hot idle. Does it stay under 50-60C @ 100%?


intel burn testing on high , max temp 60C.
a c 96 à CPUs
September 16, 2011 8:06:56 PM

Stock NB volts are in the 1.15v range -- 1.2v to 1.25v may generally be considered safe.

1.5v CPU - probably not so safe if this is a long-term proposition.

You really have not stated what the rig will be used for but increasing the IMC/NB will substantially boost the gains seen from standard over-clocking; i.e., if by over-clocking you increase your gaming fps by 10, upping the IMC/NB to the 2500/2600MHz range will increase that amount by 75% or more.

As an example ...



from here

This also demonstrates the inability of that website to objectively test anything associated with AMD if you ever review their hilariously inconsistent benching statistics.
September 16, 2011 8:07:42 PM

Quote:
4.2ghz is the maximum you will get with your setup. next would be watercooling and you will only gain incremental speed increases to around 4.4ghz maximum.
after this you will do lN2 or dice.



I am watercoolin! :D 

corsair h60
a c 96 à CPUs
September 16, 2011 8:11:23 PM

4.2GHz is not necessarily your maximum but if you do not get your volts down your temps will spiral out of control
!