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Which should I get first,,,?

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June 22, 2011 7:09:27 AM

Hey everyone....just wanted to say Im really loving the forum and just wanted to ask something which I am sure I know which option ill go with.

I have a Windows 7 / Phenom II X4 B55 *3.6GHZ 3 cORES* / 4 gb ram DDR3 / HD 5770.

Im upgrading my CPU and graphics card.

However I am doing it two separate times either the card first then a month or 2 *Hopefully* ill do the next. But in the mean time I wanna play Shogun 2 Total War *My Current setup handles it pretty good but not godly :p * I plan on changing the following:

HD 5770 / 500 WATT > 580 Nvidia / 750 Corsair PSU

Phenom II X4 B55 *Current Stock fan / overclocked* > Upgrading to a 2500k / P67 Motherboard / Hyper 12 + Fan.

Which do you think I should go first? I was thinking the graphics card upgrade first thats going to be a lil over 600$ and the Intel setup will be 450$+.

I was thinking of getting the most expensive out of the way first lol.

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a b B Homebuilt system
June 22, 2011 7:19:09 AM

Yeah, I agree that I would get the video card first. A triple core won't hold you back too much for now. The 5770 isn't bad, but I don't know what resolution you're running.
June 22, 2011 7:33:42 AM

1900 x 1080
Yeah the 5770 has done be good but...from reading benchmarks and such what its a 50% better upgrade....plus in the future I can always SLI it =D which I plan to do lol ...ofc when I need to...and by then price of another 580 will be down a little bit more :D 
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June 22, 2011 7:35:11 AM

or wait I think its 1920 x 1080 lol...Im on my sisters laptop so I cant really check :p  but I know its that one
a b B Homebuilt system
June 22, 2011 7:37:06 AM

Yep, get the 580 first. It will be cpu bound in some games but you'll notice a massive difference. As in, the GTX 580 is 3-4x the 5770. But you wouldn't notice any difference in anything with a new cpu. (if you were to upgrade that first.)
June 22, 2011 7:39:33 AM

Alright I thought so I just wanted to make sure...this is thee best place to check about PC stuff haha.

With a new CPU from the Phenom to the 2500k...I know its not much of a difference for gaming but what will I actually notice? If anything?
a b B Homebuilt system
June 22, 2011 7:58:35 AM

After you get the GTX 580 you will notice a difference, depending on the game. In general, if a game is quad core optimized you'll see less of a difference jumping to the 2500k. It sounds strange, but the games that a new CPU will help most are the ones that are "megathreaded" (one massive thread that hogs one core and leave the others doing very little) as opposed to multithreaded.
a c 83 B Homebuilt system
June 22, 2011 4:28:40 PM

CPU prices are not as competitive as graphics cards. Waiting a bit on one or the other will likely get you a getter price on a GTX580 than on a 2500K.

To get some idea of what each change will buy you, try these two tests:

1) Run your games, but lower your resolution and eye candy.
If your FPS increases, it indicates that your cpu is strong enough to drive a better graphics configuration.

2) Limit your cpu, either by reducing the OC, or, in windows power management, limit the maximum cpu% to something like 70%.
If your FPS drops significantly, it is an indicator that your cpu is the limiting factor, and a cpu upgrade is in order.

It is possible that both tests are positive, indicating that you have a well balanced system, and both cpu and gpu need to be upgraded to get better gaming FPS.

Also, the Corsair 750w is a fine psu, easily capable of handling a GTX580. But a 650w psu will also do the job, so long as it has 42a on the 12v rails.
On the other hand, a 750w psu will not be enough for two GTX580's in sli. I doubt that you will need to sli the GTX580.
Check out a 650 w unit, from XFX also, they seem attractively priced.

I am trying out Shogun2 on a 2560 x 1600 monitor and it seems to run well with a single GTX580 and a 2600K @4.0.
June 22, 2011 6:06:18 PM

Ok thank you guys for your suggestions and information!

geofelt...I am shopping from newegg.com atm and this might sound stupid but when I am looking at the info IM a little confused where I see the amps on the rails....

I am thinking its in this line:
Output
+3.3V@30A, +5V@30A, +12V@62A, -12V@0.8A, +5VSB@3.0A

I think its the third one that says +12V@62A?

If that is right then ill go check out that 650w psu :D !

Yeah I know it wouldn't be enough but...I can always upgrade that in the future as well lol...but yeah I wont be needing SLI anytime soon :p .

When you say it runs "well" how well? Like Max everything?...or..?
a c 83 B Homebuilt system
June 22, 2011 6:21:32 PM

You are correct, it is the 62a number.
Fpr psu's with multiple 12v rails, you have to look at the spec plate image of the psu. It will have the total amp output of all 12v rails. If the number is specified in watts, then divide by 12.

My short list of quality psu brands would include Seasonic, XFX, Corsair, Antec, and PC P&C.
You should be good with a 600w+ unit from any of them. Sales and rebates are common, so look for that.
June 22, 2011 6:27:09 PM

Ok will do I think I found a good 650w 12v rails 52 ams.

I am still a little confused on what you said in your post :

"Fpr psu's with multiple 12v rails, you have to look at the spec plate image of the psu. It will have the total amp output of all 12v rails. If the number is specified in watts, then divide by 12. "

Can maybe you explain that a little bit better for me...maybe use this PSU as an example?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The one I plan to get :) .
a c 83 B Homebuilt system
June 22, 2011 6:43:29 PM

The psu you picked is a single rail model and will do fine.

Here is an example of a two rail model:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
and of the spec plate:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ImageGallery.aspx?CurImag...

The spec plate shows a total of 576w for both rails, or a total of 576w/12v = 48a.
In this case, we have a quality psu, and the sum of the amps from the two rails(24a) is the same 48a.
For other psu's the sum may be somewhat less.

June 22, 2011 8:31:33 PM

Ahhh I see now...so if you have a two rail model...basically two of them together is the true amount of amps?

So if its a 12v you divide that by how many watts and you will get the amps you need?
For cards is it more of the amps you want or the watts *well I know its both* but whats more important? I mean could you have a little less wats it ask for and more amps? Or would that not work?

Thanks for the info!

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a c 83 B Homebuilt system
June 22, 2011 10:50:33 PM
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lentyski said:
Ahhh I see now...so if you have a two rail model...basically two of them together is the true amount of amps?

So if its a 12v you divide that by how many watts and you will get the amps you need?
For cards is it more of the amps you want or the watts *well I know its both* but whats more important? I mean could you have a little less wats it ask for and more amps? Or would that not work?

Thanks for the info!


In electrical terms, watts = amps x volts. So if you are looking at 12v, watts and amps are exactly proportional.
The 12v component is important because that is by far the most used voltage in a PC, particularly by the graphics card.


Cheap psu's will decieve you by claiming high wattage, but it will be for the easier to build 3.3 and 5v components.
June 22, 2011 11:21:23 PM

I get it now...thanks guys!!
June 22, 2011 11:21:43 PM

Best answer selected by lentyski.
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