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Which scanner for films?

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Anonymous
March 7, 2005 10:17:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I have lots of films. Those films were taken using microscope camera.
Could someone advise me which scanner is the best for scanning films.
Satoshi

More about : scanner films

Anonymous
March 7, 2005 11:47:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"satoshi" <satoshi@thuntek.net> writes:

> I have lots of films. Those films were taken using microscope camera.
> Could someone advise me which scanner is the best for scanning films.

35mm? I'm sure you'll find out that there isn't really clear
agreement on *best*. But of the scanners that people buy for
themselves, I'd give the nod to the Nikon Coolscan 5000. It ain't an
Imacon or a drum scanner, but very few people can afford to own those
individually.

Minolta has some scanners that people will argue for. And especially
if you're looking for a very cost-effective package, instead of
heading straight for the *best*, it gets more complicated.

These things are in the $500 to $1000 range. One of the benefits of
the Nikon 5000 is that you can get a slide feeder that iwill go
through a stack of around 50 slides automatically; but that's another
$500 nearly. Might easily be worth it, if your films are mounted as
slides and there are enough of them, though.
--
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Anonymous
March 8, 2005 12:02:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

satoshi wrote:

> I have lots of films. Those films were taken using microscope camera.
> Could someone advise me which scanner is the best for scanning films.
> Satoshi

If you're looking for the *best* you might consider the
Sony UYS 35mm Film Scanner
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Anonymous
March 8, 2005 2:35:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

The Sony UYS is `best`? It might be best in regard to batch scanning a
lot of film, but it has very poor resolution (2200 dpi), and hasn't got
a particularly good dynamic range either. This scanner was often used
by photo labs for their consumer grade (ie low-quality) scanning, but
is getting less popular nowadays.

It also costs about $7,000 if I recall correctly.

You need to ask yourself - do I really want *all* of my images scanned?
(If it's a lot, and you want them done quickly, then that batch scan
attchment will be worth it's weight in gold).. and what quality do I
need? If it is just for web display or printing to 7x5 maximum, then
maybe 2200 dpi scans will suffice (I'm assuming 35mm). But if you want
serious quality, you really need to look at 4000 dpi scans or better.
Anonymous
March 8, 2005 5:50:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"satoshi" <satoshi@thuntek.net> wrote in message
news:D 0j2iq$2si$1@reader2.nmix.net...
>I have lots of films. Those films were taken using microscope camera.
> Could someone advise me which scanner is the best for scanning films.

What size film?

My Nikon Coolscan V ED does a fantastic job with 35mm negatives and slides.
Easy to use, too.

Good shooting,
Bob Scott
Anonymous
March 8, 2005 10:33:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 08 Mar 2005 02:17:06 +0000, satoshi wrote:

> I have lots of films. Those films were taken using microscope camera.
> Could someone advise me which scanner is the best for scanning films.

Are they mounted slides or strips of negatives ?

I have just converted about 600 photomicrograph slides to digital images
using a PF3600Pro3 slide/negative scanner. It is rather on the cheap side
and manually fed, but the outcome is quite good. Highest resolution is
3600 PPI. For viewing on the PC screen & projecting through a standard
projector, I found a resolution of 900 is fine, allowing for some
cropping. It can do 9 or 18 bit colour & three levels of compression
(jpeg) & tiff format are supported.

The software includes digital ICE, very useful for removing dust marks. It
also includes ROC & GEM, useful for restoring colours - though I never had
to use them. A copy of Photoshop Elements II comes with it as well. It can
scan 36 frame negative strips in one go, if you have that long film
strips. For the usual 4 frame strips, you have feed them twice, forward &
reversed, as the scanner ignores the first 2 frames of each strip.

Warn you about one thing. Unless you get a scanner with an automatic
feeder, it is a long boring job. Each slide takes between 3 & 5 minutes
just to scan. Then almost inevitably you will have to do some digital
retouching taking more time.

--

Gautam Majumdar

Please send e-mails to gmajumdar@freeuk.com
Anonymous
March 8, 2005 12:21:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> I have just converted about 600 photomicrograph slides to digital images
> using a PF3600Pro3 slide/negative scanner. It is rather on the cheap side

Hi Gautam,

PF3600Pro sounds good. Who makes this scanner?

Satoshi
Anonymous
March 9, 2005 10:21:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 08 Mar 2005 16:21:56 +0000, Satoshi wrote:

>> I have just converted about 600 photomicrograph slides to digital
>> images using a PF3600Pro3 slide/negative scanner. It is rather on the
>> cheap side
>
> Hi Gautam,
>
> PF3600Pro sounds good. Who makes this scanner?
>
Pacific Image Electronics. It is marketed in UK by Jessops in their own
brand name. In other countries, I think, it is marketed as PrimeFilm
model (that's what PF stands for).

--

Gautam Majumdar

Please send e-mails to gmajumdar@freeuk.com
!