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Why so few Pentium Ms with Dedicated video?

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 16, 2005 10:45:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Is this observation off-base? It seems with the current crop of notebooks,
from different vendors, manufacturers are reluctant to make Pentium M
machines with dedicated video circuitry. I'm not saying they're ALL doing
this, but it seems to me like a surprising amount. They make you choose
between:

PM w/shared graphics
P4 w/dedicated graphics
AMD w/dedicated graphics

Of course, there are plenty of:
AMD w/shared graphics
P4 w/shared graphics

But far fewer of:
PM w/dedicated graphics

Why is this? Do the dedicated graphics take that much of a toll on battery
life on the PM? And since battery life (along with decent performance) is a
selling point for the PM, do manufacturers want to really preserve this
advantage?

OK, Dell, for example, has a few PMs w/dedicated video (I can't tell from
their website about the 600m or 700m) I think, but I was looking at the new
Toshibas....most are shared video memory.

So, am I missing something, or is this really the state of notebook design
right now? Thanks for your comments.


Fr@nk
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 16, 2005 11:01:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Fr@nk" <Fr@nkATwizardDOT.net> wrote:
>manufacturers are reluctant to make Pentium M
>machines with dedicated video circuitry.

My Dell Latitude D600 has a Pentium M @ 1.8GHz and a Mobility Radeon
9000. Wasn't that hard to come by. Many modern gaming laptops have
(theoretically) upgradable video!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 16, 2005 11:43:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Fr@nk wrote:

> Is this observation off-base? It seems with the current crop of notebooks,
> from different vendors, manufacturers are reluctant to make Pentium M
> machines with dedicated video circuitry. I'm not saying they're ALL doing
> this, but it seems to me like a surprising amount. They make you choose
> between:
>
> PM w/shared graphics
> P4 w/dedicated graphics
> AMD w/dedicated graphics
>
> Of course, there are plenty of:
> AMD w/shared graphics
> P4 w/shared graphics
>
> But far fewer of:
> PM w/dedicated graphics
>
> Why is this? Do the dedicated graphics take that much of a toll on battery
> life on the PM? And since battery life (along with decent performance) is
> a selling point for the PM, do manufacturers want to really preserve this
> advantage?
>
> OK, Dell, for example, has a few PMs w/dedicated video (I can't tell from
> their website about the 600m or 700m) I think, but I was looking at the
> new Toshibas....most are shared video memory.
>
> So, am I missing something, or is this really the state of notebook design
> right now? Thanks for your comments.

If you're talking Centrino the Intel spec restricts the video I believe. If
you froogle '"pentium M" nvidia' and '"pentium m" ati' (don't include the
single quotes) you should get about 22,000 hits, most of which are for
machines with the Pentium M and nvidia or ATI video.


--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 17, 2005 1:59:27 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Fr@nk" <Fr@nkATwizardDOT.net> wrote in
news:Hfnse.10882$FP2.1359@lakeread03:

> Is this observation off-base? It seems with the current crop of
> notebooks, from different vendors, manufacturers are reluctant to make
> Pentium M machines with dedicated video circuitry. I'm not saying
> they're ALL doing this, but it seems to me like a surprising amount.
> They make you choose between:

they are out there for sure, just look. my acer is a pentium m 1.6 and a
64MB Radeon Mobility 9200.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 17, 2005 2:34:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:D 8t3qh01nr6@news1.newsguy.com...
>
> If you're talking Centrino the Intel spec restricts the video I believe.
If
> you froogle '"pentium M" nvidia' and '"pentium m" ati' (don't include the
> single quotes) you should get about 22,000 hits, most of which are for
> machines with the Pentium M and nvidia or ATI video.
>
>
> --
> --John
> to email, dial "usenet" and validate
> (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)

Yeah, but that's not the way I shop for a notebook. I look to the vendors'
offerings first (and the ones I trust the most, for better or worse!), then
see what meets my requirements. Your explanation (Intel spec restricts...)
makes sense, even though that's a dumb situation. Thanks for your comments!


Fr@nk
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 17, 2005 1:48:32 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Fr@nk wrote:
> Is this observation off-base? It seems with the current crop of notebooks,
> from different vendors, manufacturers are reluctant to make Pentium M
> machines with dedicated video circuitry. I'm not saying they're ALL doing
> this, but it seems to me like a surprising amount. They make you choose
> between:
>
> PM w/shared graphics
> P4 w/dedicated graphics
> AMD w/dedicated graphics
>
> Of course, there are plenty of:
> AMD w/shared graphics
> P4 w/shared graphics
>
> But far fewer of:
> PM w/dedicated graphics
>
> Why is this? Do the dedicated graphics take that much of a toll on battery
> life on the PM? And since battery life (along with decent performance) is a
> selling point for the PM, do manufacturers want to really preserve this
> advantage?
>
> OK, Dell, for example, has a few PMs w/dedicated video (I can't tell from
> their website about the 600m or 700m) I think, but I was looking at the new
> Toshibas....most are shared video memory.
>
> So, am I missing something, or is this really the state of notebook design
> right now? Thanks for your comments.
>
>
> Fr@nk
>
>
99% of the T4x series Thinkpads come with discrete graphics. I guess it
depends what series you are looking for:

1)The cheap consumer,family-style laptops will usually come with
integrated graphics (since I find it hard to believe that many moms play
Doom3). Many Dells and Toshibas fall under this category.

2) The business style notebooks (like the Thinkpad T4x, the Toshiba S1
or the HP nc) usually come with a discrete, but not extremely fast
graphics card (like the Ati 9600/X300 for the Thinkpads). This takes the
burden away from the main memory and also allows the system to run more
graphics-intensive applications.

3) The more specialized notebooks (such as the T43p) come with
OpenGL-enhanced cards. These are not much faster than (2), but they are
better when working with apps such as CAD.

4) The gaming notebooks (see Alienware and some Dell beasts). These are
5kg beasts that usually come with the newest/fastest card there is, in
order to appeal to gamers/multimedia fanatics. Some of the newer ones
even come with upgradeable cards.

The P-M has allowed Intel to create a powerful enough chip that takes
the family customer (1) off the desktop and onto the laptop. For that,
the integrated chip is a cheaper option (since it can do 95% of what the
family wants it to do) and therefore a better one.

However, there is very little to no possibility that you will get
integrated graphics in categories 2,3 and 4. The difference is that (2)
is 50% more expensive than (1), while (4) and especially (3) can be over
100% more expensive. You get what you pay for.

Stavros
!