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Power Supply Help

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September 20, 2011 1:05:11 AM

My computer situation is getting beyond frustrating.

I recently

2x Radeon 6950
Asrock 68 extreme4
Processor i7 2600k
8gb ram
120 SSD
2 TB HD
3x Monitors

First I connected it to this power supply:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Had serious issues and came to this board for guidance, and was recommended this power supply:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Here my current problems with it:

1) When I turn the computer on, this psu is loud.
2) During one incident the power just shut off. very similar to the other psu.

A few things that I want to cover:

This computer does NOT have a virus nor do I believe at all this is a software issue. Definitely hardware (I'm 95% certain it's the psu)

My question to you guys is, is this psu also just too weak to handle this type of setup?

More about : power supply

a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 1:18:36 AM

The 6950s in Crossfire draws about 329W or ~27 amps. Both of the listed PSUs should handle these cards but with the first one you'd need to make sure that you power balance the load to provide enough power to the cards. It's highly unlikely the second PSU is bad so I'd suspect something else, possibly a short.

Try removing one 6950 and see if all works well. If not, swap 6950s and see if everything is OK with the other Vid card. You could have a bad Vid card drawing too much power?

http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-560-ti-sli-re...
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a c 90 ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 1:20:39 AM

Seasonic is a reputable brand like Corsair (which I usually recommend). 750 watts is fine for what you are doing.

It may be that you just got a defective unit. These things happen to the best of brands occasionally.
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a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 1:26:18 AM

The Seasonic is an an excellent PSU, one of the best and i believe i recommended that to you.

What it shouldn't do is make a loud noise at startup. The fan in that thing is a special one in that it doesn't even run until you put a good 300-400w load on it. You might've got a defective unit but don't let it taint Seasonic's image for you. These do happen from time to time but first, make sure it's actually coming from the PSU before you contact newegg rma services. Also try running your comp on a breadboard with the basic components and see if the noise goes away.
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September 20, 2011 1:27:08 AM

So I unplugged one of my video cards and now it's more quiet. still a slight humming but far better than what i was dealing with earlier.

What does this mean? The PSU can't handle my two video cards?
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a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 1:28:26 AM

first, try with 1 VGA, what happen ?
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a c 90 ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 1:28:54 AM

dalexc said:
So I unplugged one of my video cards and now it's more quiet. still a slight humming but far better than what i was dealing with earlier.

What does this mean? The PSU can't handle my two video cards?

750 watts can definitely handle 2 video cards!
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a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 1:29:16 AM

Oh it definitely can but can you explain the "humming" noise? I have a feeling that it is the coils whining which is annoying as hell but can go away with time. Either way, i'd contact newegg and ask for a RMA and another unit just to be on the safe side.

Sounds like you got one with some kind of problem. Sorry mate but these things do happen from time to time and it sucks =[.
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September 20, 2011 1:33:08 AM

Actually after two mins the humming noise complete disappeared. It's completely quiet now with no problems of running so far.

I'm starting to believe my main problem was having this second video card in here. But like someone else said, that should not be a problem for this psu, then why exactly is it?

Also, should I be connecting power plugs into both psu's? I didn't, but just wanted to know. Thanks.
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September 20, 2011 1:34:45 AM

I really don't think the PSU is too weak to handle that setup. From the description you have given, the issue could be coming from any number of components. Here are a few simple things I would do to eliminate some potential issues:


1.) Make sure your power cable is fully plugged in, not loose. Also use a surge protector, they are cheap and worth it.

2.) Download and run some CPU/GPU temperature monitoring software such as HWMonitor from CPUID. If your computer shuts off when you start stressing the computer, I would suspect that your CPU heatsink might not be correctly seated. In this case, you would see excessively high temperatures under load (~70+ Celsius for a stock clock i7-2600k).

http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor.html

3.) Make sure the RAM modules are seated correctly in the RAM slots on the motherboard.

4.) Make sure all the cables going from the power supply to the components are fully plugged in, especially the CPU power and Motherboard Power cables.


Those are the most common things worth checking in my opinion. Usually when you are talking about a new build shutting off randomly, it will be related to the PSU or CPU.
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a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 1:35:57 AM

connecting power plugs to both PSU's?

I'm confused...

Anyways make sure you use both the PCI-E connectors for both cards plugged in FROM ONE PSU (the x750).

Leave your comp running for like 15 mins and see if the noise goes away. It might be just your unit needs "breaking in" but if the problem still consists for next couple of days then i'd definitely look at RMA'ing it.
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a c 90 ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 1:37:23 AM

lilotimz said:
Oh it definitely can but can you explain the "humming" noise? I have a feeling that it is the coils whining which is annoying as hell but can go away with time. Either way, i'd contact newegg and ask for a RMA and another unit just to be on the safe side.

Sounds like you got one with some kind of problem. Sorry mate but these things do happen from time to time and it sucks =[.

The 'humming' is from the transformer laminations (called lams), usually 0.5 mm thick. The transformer core is laminated to reduce eddy current losses that result in heat. These lams are put together with the same punch side so that the burr sides conform together, known as 'packetting'. After that the packets are placed in a hydraulic press and either riveted together or secured by a few weld seams.

If the lams are not real tightly held together, the lams will vibrate at the AC (50 Hz or 60 Hz) frequency and result in humming.
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September 20, 2011 1:38:17 AM

I actually thought the CPU was my problem initially and did run a test, temperature went up to 97 degrees Celsius at the most. Never above that talked to a rep from intel and said that is normal.
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a c 90 ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 1:40:13 AM

dalexc said:
I actually thought the CPU was my problem initially and did run a test, temperature went up to 97 degrees Celsius at the most. Never above that talked to a rep from intel and said that is normal.

In use, never let it get over 70 degrees C. The Intel rep won't be there when your CPU goes up in smoke!
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a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 1:46:39 AM

97 Celcius?!?!?!

Isn't 100-105C the point where the CPU shuts itself down to avoid heat damage?
As ubrales say, don't let it keep above 70C that often so look into that as well. Reapply thermal paste, reseat heatsink etc.


-> Ubrales ~ thanks for the info... still learning on electrical circuitry and all those "pretty" things.... 'sigh'
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September 20, 2011 1:52:37 AM

My cpu did not come with a fan that required paste. It's one of the smaller ones that just clicked on the motherboard. Is this my problem?
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a c 90 ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 1:56:08 AM

dalexc said:
My cpu did not come with a fan that required paste. It's one of the smaller ones that just clicked on the motherboard. Is this my problem?

With those things one never knows how well it is in contact with the CPU. For a good system go with a good after-market heatsink which has screws type fasteners. And make sure that the thermal compound application is per industry standards. Many posts here (including some from me) on the topic.
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September 20, 2011 1:58:12 AM

97 degrees when I'm gaming. Currently it's at 64 degress.
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a c 90 ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 2:15:59 AM

dalexc said:
97 degrees when I'm gaming. Currently it's at 64 degress.

Mine is currently at 30 degrees C.

In your case, the heatsink/CPU installation is not right. You may also need to check your air flow and fans.
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September 20, 2011 4:20:00 AM

Yeah, I agree with the rest. Reseat that heatsink and see if temperatures drop. Despite what the Intel guy said, you don't want to be anywhere near 97 degrees.

So I think the CPU Heatsink issue solves your problem of a random shutdown, but then you still had the problem with the PSU.

I remember researching the Seasonic Gold PSUs a while ago, and I recall some users also heard a whining/humming noise coming from the PSU. I don't know much about the technical details of PSU hardware, but this is probably an idiosyncrasy of the PSU that should not affect its performance. If your hum goes away after a couple of minutes and the PSU works fine, then it is probably ok.

As far as the single vs. dual 6950 setup in your system is concerned, I'm guessing the issue has to do with cabling. Make sure you plug 2 x 6pin connectors from the PSU to EACH GPU. Basically, each GPU should be getting its own dedicated cable coming from the PSU.
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September 20, 2011 12:14:38 PM

I think it's the cabling as well. I did the exact opposite of what you suggested thinking I was SAVING power that way.

You guys have to excuse my noobiness, my first time I ever built a pc.
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September 20, 2011 11:03:40 PM

Lol no problem, we were all there at some point. The best way to make a build go smoothly though is to read the manuals and follow the instructions. With my first build, I had little prior knowledge of how the computer should be put together, but I just took my time and followed those manuals, and it worked out fine.

And yea trying to save power that way is like giving two hungry lions one piece of meat and telling them to fight for it. Your computer is pretty beastly, gotta feed the animals!
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