$1500 - 2000 Gaming PC - First Time Building a Computer

Approximate Purchase Date: June 30, 2011 (closer the better)

Budget Range: $1500 - $2000 (I'm okay if it goes somewhat over $2000)

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, surfing the web, music, movies, schoolwork.

Parts Not Required: Mouse.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: www.newegg.com

Country of Origin: I am in the U.S.

Parts Preferences: Intel processors, Nvidia cards, ASUS motherboards

Overclocking: Yes, not too extreme. I'm somewhat of a computer noob, so I don't think I'll be able to handle too much overclocking.

SLI or Crossfire: Yes, eventually.

Monitor Resolution: I don't know.

Additional Comments: I want this computer to last about 4 years, not sure if that's too much to ask for, haha! I don't want the PC to be unreasonably loud. I want it to have sufficient cooling. I don't think an SSD is necessary. Feel free to explain to me as to why I should get one, because I am kind of a noob about computers (I don't see the benefit compared to the price). If someone could suggest some nice, surround-sound gaming headsets and a mechanical keyboard (preferably backlit), that would be nice. I don't have to have all the video cards right away. I'm thinking about starting with a single card, and steadily adding more. I have chosen a lot or parts already. Please tell me if they are incompatible or if I made a bad decision and should choose something else. Matching colors are nice, too.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Motherboard:
ASUS MAXIMUS IV EXTREME (REV 3.0) LGA 1155 Intel P67 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Extended ATX Intel Motherboard
OR
ASUS Maximus IV Extreme-Z LGA 1155 Intel Z68 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Extended ATX Intel Motherboard


CPU:
Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) 4 x 256KB L2 Cache 8MB L3 Cache LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor


RAM:
G.SKILL Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866 (PC3 14900) Desktop Memory Model F3-14900CL9D-8GBSR


Video Card:
ASUS ENGTX580 DCII/2DIS/1536MD5 GeForce GTX 580 (Fermi) 1536MB 384-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card


Storage:
SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ 1TB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive


Thank you, for your time.
54 answers Last reply
More about 1500 2000 gaming time building computer
  1. You can get the i-5 2500K it's just as fast for your needs.
    Mobo
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128507
    All the RAM will work at 1333 so:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231445
    or
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231440
    The latencies matter, the lower the better

    You can get a HD 6970 (slightly slower, much cheaper)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102918&cm_re=hd_6970-_-14-102-918-_-Product

    he GTX 580 has a bad performance/price ratio. For one monitor you can get a GTX 570 if you want Nvidia.
  2. a true fps pusher:

    this is a build that i built for this competition: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/312826-31-bestconfigs-high-intel-gaming

    Intel i5 2500k: 220$ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115072&cm_re=i5_2500k-_-19-115-072-_-Product

    SAPPHIRE PURE Black P67: 230$ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813154018

    G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB): 75$ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231445&cm_re=gskill_ram_8gb_1600-_-20-231-445-_-Product

    MSI R6950 Twin Frozr II Radeon HD 6950 2GB: x3=840$ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127588&cm_re=6950-_-14-127-588-_-Product

    Samung Spinpoint F3 1TB HDD: 60$ http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-Spinpoint-3-5-Inch-Internal-HD103SJ/dp/B002MQC0P8/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1308753807&sr=8-2

    Corsair Force Series 3 120GB: 210$ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233181&cm_re=force_3-_-20-233-181-_-Product

    IN WIN Ironclad: 120$ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811108230&cm_re=full_tower_case-_-11-108-230-_-Product

    PC Power and Cooling Silencer Mk II 950W: 150$ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817703028&cm_re=pc_power_and_cooling-_-17-703-028-_-Product

    CORSAIR CWCH60 Hydro Series H60: 70$ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835181015&cm_re=h60-_-35-181-015-_-Product

    ASUS 24X DVD Burner: 21$ http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B0033Z2BAQ/ref=dp_olp_new?ie=UTF8&qid=1308845145&sr=1-1&condition=new

    Total: 1996$

    change ram to this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145324&cm_re=8gb_1600-_-20-145-324-_-Product -19$ the other ram is faster. just trying to keep it under 2000$

    that ssd is out of stock: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227726&cm_re=agility_3_120gb-_-20-227-726-_-Product -15$

    +20$ for the case's shipping

    -20$ for the psu's rebate

    change the cpu cooler to the noctua nh-d14 +13$- http://www.amazon.com/Noctua-Heatpipe-Bearing-Cooler-NH-D14/dp/B002VKVZ1A/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1308793391&sr=1-1

    change the motherboard to this one- http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=MB-8P67WS3&c=FR&pid=3b62c1f83100b7c9009b869e1fe8c6389f82ab2d7196881ae47393d5c72278b7 +25$
  3. Is $2000 enough for a multi-monitor setup?
  4. Which is better: 2 Radeon HD 6970's or 2 Geforce GTX 570's?
  5. This build includes dual HDMI Full HD LED 2ms gaming monitors, dual MSI 6950 2GB vid cards, after market cpu h/s (thermal paste included), Windows 7, etc...

    http://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Enforcer-Interior-SGC-1000-KWN1/dp/B004WK3KKQ/ref=sr_1_10?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1309083820&sr=1-10 $79.99 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
    Cooler Master Storm Enforcer USB 3.0 Mid Tower ATX Case with Window and Black Interior (SGC-1000-KWN1)

    http://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Computer-Cooling-R4-LUS-07AR-GP/dp/B002LE8BJA/ref=pd_bxgy_e_img_b $14.76 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25
    Cooler Master Computer Case Cooling R4-LUS-07AR-GP 200mm Red LED Case Fan

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371049 $99.99 - $84.99 after mail-in rebate FREE SHIPPING
    Antec High Current Gamer Series HCG-750 750W ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.91 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.674958 $188.98
    GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
    G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.656677 $266.98
    Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I52500K
    Seagate Barracuda ST31000524AS 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002G1YPH0/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER $29.51 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
    Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler, RR-B10-212P-G1

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127588 $279.99 FREE SHIPPING
    MSI R6950 Twin Frozr II Radeon HD 6950 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127588 $279.99 FREE SHIPPING
    MSI R6950 Twin Frozr II Radeon HD 6950 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106289 $18.99 FREE SHIPPING
    LITE-ON DVD Burner - Bulk 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM Black SATA Model iHAS124-04 - OEM

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116986 $99.99 FREE SHIPPING
    Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236099 $169.99 - $154.99 after mail-in rebate card FREE SHIPPING
    Asus ML228H 21.5" 1920X1080 2ms Full HD LED BackLight LED Monitor Slim Design 250 cd/m2 10,000,000 :1 (ASCR)

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236099 $169.99 - $154.99 after mail-in rebate card FREE SHIPPING
    Asus ML228H 21.5" 1920X1080 2ms Full HD LED BackLight LED Monitor Slim Design 250 cd/m2 10,000,000 :1 (ASCR)

    Total: $1,699.15 *not including shipping, mail in rebates, etc...

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16823126087 $64.99 FREE SHIPPING
    Logitech G110 Black USB Wired LED Backlighting Gaming Keyboard

    http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-PC-350-Collapsible-Microphone/dp/B0012XFDWO/ref=sr_1_3?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1309087763&sr=1-3 $170.60 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
    Sennheiser PC 350 Collapsible Gaming Headset with Vol Control & Microphone Mute

    http://www.coolermaster-usa.com/product.php?category_id=19&product_id=3038 <----- more pics, specs, and professional reviews on that CM case.
  6. Why_Me said:
    This build includes dual HDMI Full HD LED 2ms gaming monitors, dual MSI 6950 2GB vid cards, after market cpu h/s (thermal paste included), Window 7, etc...

    http://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Enforcer-Interior-SGC-1000-KWN1/dp/B004WK3KKQ/ref=sr_1_10?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1309083820&sr=1-10 $79.99 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
    Cooler Master Storm Enforcer USB 3.0 Mid Tower ATX Case with Window and Black Interior (SGC-1000-KWN1)

    http://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Computer-Cooling-R4-LUS-07AR-GP/dp/B002LE8BJA/ref=pd_bxgy_e_img_b $14.76 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25
    Cooler Master Computer Case Cooling R4-LUS-07AR-GP

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371049 $99.99 - $84.99 after mail-in rebate FREE SHIPPING
    Antec High Current Gamer Series HCG-750 750W ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.91 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.674958 $188.98
    GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
    G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.656677 $266.98
    Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I52500K
    Seagate Barracuda ST31000524AS 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002G1YPH0/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER $29.51 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
    Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler, RR-B10-212P-G1

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127588 $279.99 FREE SHIPPING
    MSI R6950 Twin Frozr II Radeon HD 6950 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127588 $279.99 FREE SHIPPING
    MSI R6950 Twin Frozr II Radeon HD 6950 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106289 $18.99 FREE SHIPPING
    LITE-ON DVD Burner - Bulk 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM Black SATA Model iHAS124-04 - OEM

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116986 $99.99 FREE SHIPPING
    Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236099 $169.99 - $154.99 after mail-in rebate card FREE SHIPPING
    Asus ML228H 21.5" 1920X1080 2ms Full HD LED BackLight LED Monitor Slim Design 250 cd/m2 10,000,000 :1 (ASCR)

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236099 $169.99 - $154.99 after mail-in rebate card FREE SHIPPING
    Asus ML228H 21.5" 1920X1080 2ms Full HD LED BackLight LED Monitor Slim Design 250 cd/m2 10,000,000 :1 (ASCR)

    Total: $1,699.15 *not including shipping, mail in rebates, etc...

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16823126087 $64.99 FREE SHIPPING
    Logitech G110 Black USB Wired LED Backlighting Gaming Keyboard

    http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-PC-350-Collapsible-Microphone/dp/B0012XFDWO/ref=sr_1_3?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1309087763&sr=1-3 $170.60 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
    Sennheiser PC 350 Collapsible Gaming Headset with Vol Control & Microphone Mute


    Why Me, this is a really thoughtful and interesting build.
  7. Why_Me said:
    This build includes dual HDMI Full HD LED 2ms gaming monitors, dual MSI 6950 2GB vid cards, after market cpu h/s (thermal paste included), Window 7, etc...

    http://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Enforcer-Interior-SGC-1000-KWN1/dp/B004WK3KKQ/ref=sr_1_10?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1309083820&sr=1-10 $79.99 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
    Cooler Master Storm Enforcer USB 3.0 Mid Tower ATX Case with Window and Black Interior (SGC-1000-KWN1)

    http://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Computer-Cooling-R4-LUS-07AR-GP/dp/B002LE8BJA/ref=pd_bxgy_e_img_b $14.76 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25
    Cooler Master Computer Case Cooling R4-LUS-07AR-GP

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371049 $99.99 - $84.99 after mail-in rebate FREE SHIPPING
    Antec High Current Gamer Series HCG-750 750W ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.91 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.674958 $188.98
    GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
    G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.656677 $266.98
    Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I52500K
    Seagate Barracuda ST31000524AS 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002G1YPH0/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER $29.51 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
    Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler, RR-B10-212P-G1

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127588 $279.99 FREE SHIPPING
    MSI R6950 Twin Frozr II Radeon HD 6950 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127588 $279.99 FREE SHIPPING
    MSI R6950 Twin Frozr II Radeon HD 6950 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106289 $18.99 FREE SHIPPING
    LITE-ON DVD Burner - Bulk 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM Black SATA Model iHAS124-04 - OEM

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116986 $99.99 FREE SHIPPING
    Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236099 $169.99 - $154.99 after mail-in rebate card FREE SHIPPING
    Asus ML228H 21.5" 1920X1080 2ms Full HD LED BackLight LED Monitor Slim Design 250 cd/m2 10,000,000 :1 (ASCR)

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236099 $169.99 - $154.99 after mail-in rebate card FREE SHIPPING
    Asus ML228H 21.5" 1920X1080 2ms Full HD LED BackLight LED Monitor Slim Design 250 cd/m2 10,000,000 :1 (ASCR)

    Total: $1,699.15 *not including shipping, mail in rebates, etc...

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16823126087 $64.99 FREE SHIPPING
    Logitech G110 Black USB Wired LED Backlighting Gaming Keyboard

    http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-PC-350-Collapsible-Microphone/dp/B0012XFDWO/ref=sr_1_3?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1309087763&sr=1-3 $170.60 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
    Sennheiser PC 350 Collapsible Gaming Headset with Vol Control & Microphone Mute

    you always have to outdo us huh? ;)
  8. Would this single monitor set-up work well? Will it have any heat problems or lack of performance? I chose the GTX 580 (starting with one), because I don't have the patience to wait until the GTX 590s are back in stock. I didn't get two Radeon HD 6970s, because dual SLI GTX 580 would preform better. Please, correct me if I'm wrong.


    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.662162 $339.97
    COOLER MASTER Silent Pro Gold Series RSA00-80GAD3-US 1000W ATX 12V v2.3 / EPS 12V v2.92 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
    COOLER MASTER HAF 932 Blue RC-932-KKN3-GP Black Steel ATX Full Tower Computer Case

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.674836 $234.98
    GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
    Crucial RealSSD C300 CTFDDAC064MAG-1G1 2.5" 64GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.656677 $266.98
    Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I52500K
    Seagate Barracuda ST31000524AS 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233147 $86.99
    CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMZ8GX3M2A1600C8

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130590 $489.99
    EVGA SuperClocked 015-P3-1582-AR GeForce GTX 580 (Fermi) 1536MB 384-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827135204 $19.99
    ASUS 24X DVD Burner - Bulk 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM Black SATA Model DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS - OEM

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835100007 $11.98
    Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound - OEM

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002G1YPH0/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&tag=vglnk-c1001-20 $29.51
    Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler, RR-B10-212P-G1

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116986 $99.99
    Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16826402014 $92.54
    Audio-Technica ATH-AD700 3.5mm/ 6.3mm Connector Circumaural Open-Air Dynamic Headphone

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003XQE040/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=&seller= $126.09
    XARMOR-U9BL Backlit Keyboard Illuminated Mechanical Keyboard

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=24-254-052&SortField=0&SummaryType=0&Pagesize=10&PurchaseMark=&SelectedRating=-1&VideoOnlyMark=False&VendorMark=&IsFeedbackTab=true&Page=2#scrollFullInfo $269.99
    Hanns-G HZ281HPB 27.5'' 3ms Full HD 1080P HDMI WideScreen LCD Monitor 400cd/m2 X-Contrast 15,000:1(800:1)Built-in Speakers

    Total: $2,069.00 *not including shipping, mail in rebates, etc...


    I know that I will not be able to use the ATH-AD700 headset to its full capabilities with the on-board sound card, so I hope someone can suggest a good quality sound card that is not too expensive, preferably under $150 (unless it's REALLY good). I will be using the headset mostly for gaming (including FPS) and music (a lot of genres). Also, please tell me if I left something essential out of my build.
  9. Is a Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler enough if I plan on overclocking to about 4.5 GHz occasionally?
  10. ya that will be fine
  11. mjmjpfaff said:
    ya that will be fine


    To the build or the question about the CPU cooler?
  12. cpu cooler question
  13. Parts ordered, went with the GTX 580 Lightning as my video card. O:
  14. you'll sli in the future?
  15. mjmjpfaff said:
    you'll sli in the future?

    Yes.
  16. Nubcake said:
    Yes.

    sounds pretty awesome
  17. Got any tips on building it?
  18. its really simple. the hardest part was putting on the cpu cooler. For that, just be patient because it will fit, and also dont force anything
  19. Is it necessary to select a best answer?
  20. nope
  21. I know this may be late and take my reply with a grain of salt. Ignore if you wish...your option but

    If this is your first build, I wouldn't sink >$1000. There are millions (Yes, look at motherboards. They have millions---BILLIONS of possible problems) of things to go wrong and, as a first time builder, you may run into 1, 2, 7+ of these. I would buy the case and PSU that wou want, the buy a cheap Celeron/mobo combo and get the basics of building a machine. This would also give you a unit to bench test possible faulty equipment for your future builds and upgrades.

    I always sigh when I see first time builder dumping LOADS of money into a new computer. All the forums you read and questions you post and reviews you read do not make up for experience working with parts. If you want my suggestions for test builds on the cheap, I can point you to eBay and Newegg for super cheap parts to learn the basics.

    Good luck, ask MANY questions and HAVE FUN!!

    I will ALWAYS recommend a <250 first build that will move to a crap case for component testing. It would be MUCH more worth the cost of this than to purchase another graphics card. That way you won't damage your GOOD computer.
    But go on as you wish. If you want, I'll post specs for a beginner build. (usually i3 systems now.)
  22. puttsy said:
    I know this may be late and take my reply with a grain of salt. Ignore if you wish...your option but

    If this is your first build, I wouldn't sink >$1000. There are millions (Yes, look at motherboards. They have millions---BILLIONS of possible problems) of things to go wrong and, as a first time builder, you may run into 1, 2, 7+ of these. I would buy the case and PSU that wou want, the buy a cheap Celeron/mobo combo and get the basics of building a machine. This would also give you a unit to bench test possible faulty equipment for your future builds and upgrades.

    I always sigh when I see first time builder dumping LOADS of money into a new computer. All the forums you read and questions you post and reviews you read do not make up for experience working with parts. If you want my suggestions for test builds on the cheap, I can point you to eBay and Newegg for super cheap parts to learn the basics.

    Good luck, ask MANY questions and HAVE FUN!!

    I will ALWAYS recommend a <250 first build that will move to a crap case for component testing. It would be MUCH more worth the cost of this than to purchase another graphics card. That way you won't damage your GOOD computer.
    But go on as you wish. If you want, I'll post specs for a beginner build. (usually i3 systems now.)


    That is a very interesting viewpoint. Do you think it has changed because of the ease of which new mobos offer step by step guidance? I have a friend who knows nothing about building computers and he just built a 2600K rig with an aftermarket cooler. He took a long time (about two days working off and on) and stopped to ask questions but he got through it with no problems. The Asus Pro Z68 was very user friendly and he just carefully followed the instructions.

    It appears the the K CPUs are easier to build with than the I-7 9xx CPUs, especially when it comes to overclocking.
  23. I know you already built but, for anyone else that comes across this, a nice, cheap little build that you could use to learn and make mistakes on is here:

    MSI Motherboard: (Decent brand of motherboard. One tick below Asus and Gigabyte in my book. About on par with Foxconn*, maybe a bit higher.)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130588

    That mobo. would allow you to learn about BIOS (Well, UEFI but, it's the new incarnation of. Not nearly the same but, it is necessary to understand the mobo information)

    And a nice little Intel i3 Processor:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115078

    This will allow you to learn how to install processors and INTEL heatsinks. The heatsinks suck, but, they work well for what they are. I buy aftermarket HSF's that screw onto the board and allow a more easy installation.


    Obviously you can buy the RAM that you intended on buying for your more expensive RIG and use it in this little one, that saves some change. After a while, go ahead and buy parts to finish this little one out AFTER your major build and you'll have a nice little diagnostics setup. Now you can repair others computers and start making money!
    If you are willing, you can build a REALLY cheap, GOOD system

    If you are looking for an even cheaper build, look into Intel socket 775 motherboards and processors on eBay. I just bought an Intel Workstation motherboard for $20 (including shipping) and used a Pentium D from a machine long ago upgraded. It is a solid workstation that is on par with C2D's for general, everyday use. You can find Decent 775 processors for dirt cheap. Such as Pentium 4 HT's for <$10 and PD's for <$25. That makes a $50 build, plus some ValueRAM and you have a great educational experience.

    Not that you are not capable of building your $2000 system but, I have had about 15 people bring a custom built machine to me that they could not get working this past year alone. That leaves me having to figure out what the heck they screwed up and also work with hardware I don't often deal with. Just a thought.
  24. flong said:
    That is a very interesting viewpoint. Do you think it has changed because of the ease of which new mobos offer step by step guidance? I have a friend who knows nothing about building computers and he just built a 2600K rig with an aftermarket cooler. He took a long time (about two days working off and on) and stopped to ask questions but he got through it with no problems. The Asus Pro Z68 was very user friendly and he just carefully followed the instructions.

    It appears the the K CPUs are easier to build with than the I-7 9xx CPUs, especially when it comes to overclocking.


    Thanks for bringing that up. But, You can read the manual for a car, learn a heck of a lot about driving but, you still don't know how to drive, let alone drive well by simply reading the owners manual. Same goes for computers. Yes, the motherboard comes with a step-by-step guide, maybe even on a poster of how a computer is assembled but, at the point he was at, taking days to build it and following ever little motion as-per the directions, is he really building that computer or simply assembling it? Like it is a toy we got as children which stated (some assembly required. Batteries not included). Whe you are just going off of the guide, you are utterly and completely clueless as to what you are actually doing. I don't know all of how computer components work, few people actually do but, I DO know why I am assembling them and what I expect to gain, what the differences are between my i5 build vs my C2D build etc... (memory management is a HUGE thing here) Also, motherboards have been shipping with those guides for as long as I can remember. I have old, brand new Asus boards back from the P1 era that have the directions with them.

    I find the joy in looking for parts that work together (Making sure I don't have a 1366 proc. with a 1156 board) or making sure my RAM will perform as it should. (NOT overclocked to achieve it's true speed. I want to overclock my ram PAST it's default, not up to. Some may not know what I am referring to here, ask and I'll elaborate but irrelevant to this topic) Being able to look that up and quote someone a price in minutes is an amazing feat and I have been doing that for years. (Not so much anymore). that is building computers though. We have all been cheated by barebones systems that do the leg work for us. I don't buy them, I don't want them but, a lot of people get them because they are EASY to pick out a build with them.

    Short answer? No, I don't think it has changed BUT, thank you for bringing it up. Intel processors come with similar manuals as well, that walk you through the installation, physically.

    All of this paperwork should be used as a reference, not a set of instructions or as a guide. That is what they were designed for. They are not Lego's that have designated directions for you to follow. You should glance at the motherboard guide in moments of confusion or needing clarification but, you should not use them as instructions for building your computer from.

    Not to sound mean and this is nothing against you but first time builders everywhere. I am tired of cleaning up their mess and bailing them out on online forums. But I do it to help the community. And I didn't have these resources on my first builds, count yourself lucky...
  25. puttsy said:
    Thanks for bringing that up. But, You can read the manual for a car, learn a heck of a lot about driving but, you still don't know how to drive, let alone drive well by simply reading the owners manual. Same goes for computers. Yes, the motherboard comes with a step-by-step guide, maybe even on a poster of how a computer is assembled but, at the point he was at, taking days to build it and following ever little motion as-per the directions, is he really building that computer or simply assembling it? Like it is a toy we got as children which stated (some assembly required. Batteries not included). Whe you are just going off of the guide, you are utterly and completely clueless as to what you are actually doing. I don't know all of how computer components work, few people actually do but, I DO know why I am assembling them and what I expect to gain, what the differences are between my i5 build vs my C2D build etc... (memory management is a HUGE thing here) Also, motherboards have been shipping with those guides for as long as I can remember. I have old, brand new Asus boards back from the P1 era that have the directions with them.

    I find the joy in looking for parts that work together (Making sure I don't have a 1366 proc. with a 1156 board) or making sure my RAM will perform as it should. (NOT overclocked to achieve it's true speed. I want to overclock my ram PAST it's default, not up to. Some may not know what I am referring to here, ask and I'll elaborate but irrelevant to this topic) Being able to look that up and quote someone a price in minutes is an amazing feat and I have been doing that for years. (Not so much anymore). that is building computers though. We have all been cheated by barebones systems that do the leg work for us. I don't buy them, I don't want them but, a lot of people get them because they are EASY to pick out a build with them.

    Short answer? No, I don't think it has changed BUT, thank you for bringing it up. Intel processors come with similar manuals as well, that walk you through the installation, physically.

    All of this paperwork should be used as a reference, not a set of instructions or as a guide. That is what they were designed for. They are not Lego's that have designated directions for you to follow. You should glance at the motherboard guide in moments of confusion or needing clarification but, you should not use them as instructions for building your computer from.

    Not to sound mean and this is nothing against you but first time builders everywhere. I am tired of cleaning up their mess and bailing them out on online forums. But I do it to help the community. And I didn't have these resources on my first builds, count yourself lucky...

    i understand your point.

    i just built my first computer and i had a faulty motherboard. it is not that hard to figure out that all you have to do is contact rma even though it was my first build. once i got a new motherboard my computer worked fine.

    building computers have become more and more user friendly, different sized slots for where things go, and the cpu can only fit 1 way. and sometimes it isnt the person that screwed things up it is the components. i give the op the benifit of the doubt because im sure when he was a child he fit the square peg into the square hole. :D
  26. Back in the day...a day not so long ago, flashing your bios was like rolling the dice and over clocking wasn't for the feint of heart. All that's changed now and even better yet peeps don't need to be a rocket scientist and have super low timing ram to o/c. It just keeps getting easier and easier...as it should. Technology should help, not hinder.
  27. puttsy said:
    Thanks for bringing that up. But, You can read the manual for a car, learn a heck of a lot about driving but, you still don't know how to drive, let alone drive well by simply reading the owners manual. Same goes for computers. Yes, the motherboard comes with a step-by-step guide, maybe even on a poster of how a computer is assembled but, at the point he was at, taking days to build it and following ever little motion as-per the directions, is he really building that computer or simply assembling it? Like it is a toy we got as children which stated (some assembly required. Batteries not included). Whe you are just going off of the guide, you are utterly and completely clueless as to what you are actually doing. I don't know all of how computer components work, few people actually do but, I DO know why I am assembling them and what I expect to gain, what the differences are between my i5 build vs my C2D build etc... (memory management is a HUGE thing here) Also, motherboards have been shipping with those guides for as long as I can remember. I have old, brand new Asus boards back from the P1 era that have the directions with them.

    I find the joy in looking for parts that work together (Making sure I don't have a 1366 proc. with a 1156 board) or making sure my RAM will perform as it should. (NOT overclocked to achieve it's true speed. I want to overclock my ram PAST it's default, not up to. Some may not know what I am referring to here, ask and I'll elaborate but irrelevant to this topic) Being able to look that up and quote someone a price in minutes is an amazing feat and I have been doing that for years. (Not so much anymore). that is building computers though. We have all been cheated by barebones systems that do the leg work for us. I don't buy them, I don't want them but, a lot of people get them because they are EASY to pick out a build with them.

    Short answer? No, I don't think it has changed BUT, thank you for bringing it up. Intel processors come with similar manuals as well, that walk you through the installation, physically.

    All of this paperwork should be used as a reference, not a set of instructions or as a guide. That is what they were designed for. They are not Lego's that have designated directions for you to follow. You should glance at the motherboard guide in moments of confusion or needing clarification but, you should not use them as instructions for building your computer from.

    Not to sound mean and this is nothing against you but first time builders everywhere. I am tired of cleaning up their mess and bailing them out on online forums. But I do it to help the community. And I didn't have these resources on my first builds, count yourself lucky...


    You didn't sound mean and I appreciate your point of view. I have always bought pre-built computers in the past but with the last few I ended up changing a lot of things anyway because I did not like the components that the pre-built company had used (cheap video cards, etc.).

    It became apparent to me with the purchase of my last computer that I would be ahead to just build my own. That way I would not be at the mercy of the companies that build computers for you. So I have spent an huge amount of time educating myself as to the best components and the general knowledge of building a computer.

    I just purchased a 6 gb/s Sata III 64 mb cache 1.5 TB Hitachi HDD for $55.00 and a Corsair 3 120 GB SSD for $180 after rebates. I would have paid twice that for similar components in a pre-built computer (if I could get them at all). This will go with my CM HAF X, my Corsair 850 HX and a 2600K CPU. I am still debating the motherboard - probably an ASUS Z68 Pro V.

    Hopefully with all my preparation, I won't be one of the people more experienced builders like you have to rescue :-).
  28. Just to update, I finished the build! Success! Everything is fine, as far as I know. I just need to call FiOS people to come over and move my router, so I don't have to buy a wireless adapter.

    I did consider building a cheaper system first for practice, but I got really hasty and over-confident.
  29. just unscrew the cable line and plug it in to a cable output near your computer and use ethernet from there
  30. He already moved it.

    I'm having some trouble with setting up smart response. Every time I enable acceleration and restart the computer, I get to a screen that says:

    "Loading Operating System...

    Press any key to use XpressRecovery2......"

    It won't let me get into the OS.

    And when I do use it, it says something about unable to find Windows OS in HDD partition.
  31. how big of an ssd do you have? i would only use an ssd by itself using it for smart response is stupid since raid setups can compete with it
  32. My SSD is 64 GB.
  33. ya dont use it for smart response just a boot drive.
  34. But since I already bought a Z68 board, that seems wasteful...
  35. it would be a waste of an ssd. anyways p67's ive heard have problems with ssd's as boot drives and z68's dont
  36. If I buy an identical mechanical hard drive, set it to raid and use the SSD as a boot drive, will that be as fast as smart response?
  37. nearly. using smart response does not speed up os boot times so that is why you use the ssd as a boot drive and dont use it for smart response
  38. I'm not that interested in OS boot times. I'm more interested in overall performance and how fast various programs can start up.

    If I do decide to use RAID and an SSD as a boot drive, do I need to set the RAID up before I start installing all my programs, games, etc.?
  39. Nubcake said:
    I'm not that interested in OS boot times. I'm more interested in overall performance and how fast various programs can start up.

    If I do decide to use RAID and an SSD as a boot drive, do I need to set the RAID up before I start installing all my programs, games, etc.?

    i dont think so
  40. So if I wanted to set up RAID, I can do it after using the computer after a certain amount of time, and I won't lose the stuff I put on the first hard drive?
  41. no you wont lose anything
  42. I'm trying Smart Response one last time. If this doesn't work, I'm gonna go RAID and SSD boot drive. Wish me luck? I hope try #12 is the charm, haha!

    EDIT: It didn't work. Still won't load into Windows. Screen says: Loading Operating System...
    Press any key to startup XpressRecovery2.....

    When I go into XpressRecovery2 and press Backup (only other option than reboot), it says: Not found any MS Windows OS or System partition type is GPT.

    Anyone have any idea to get Smart Response to work? If not I'm just gonna use my SSD as a boot drive.
  43. depending on how many important programs you use most often, a 64 GB drive will work as a boot drive. A lot of people on line have used a 64 GB drive as a boot drive successfully. Keep in mind that you should not load the drive past 3/4 full in most cases.
  44. Is there any option that lets Windows automatically limit what can go on the SSD?
  45. Nubcake said:
    Is there any option that lets Windows automatically limit what can go on the SSD?

    you have to do that yourself. make sure everything you want to load fast goes on the ssd and everything else on your hdd
  46. I was asking, because for some reason, I'm really bad at keeping thing out of a hard drive. Btw, do all the drivers also go one the SSD?
  47. Nubcake said:
    I was asking, because for some reason, I'm really bad at keeping thing out of a hard drive. Btw, do all the drivers also go one the SSD?

    put the drivers on you hdd for sure
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