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Please recommend a PSU for my parts

Last response: in Components
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September 20, 2011 9:35:42 PM

Hello,
I'm building a new computer and I have my parts picked, Im just not sure what PSU to use for it.

these are the parts im planning to use:

Case: T6027 10-Bay ATX Mid Tower
HDD:hitachi deskstar 7k3000
PSU: Someone please make a recommendation here, I have no idea!
Motherboard: ASUS P8P67 LE LGA 1155
CPU: i7-2600 or 2600k
RAM: PNY 4GB DDR3 PC3-10666 1333MHZ DIMM (x2 = 8GB)
Graphics card: ATI Radeon 5450 (because i already have this)
Cooling: I have a large fan from my old computer, says cooler master on it...maybe i need more, im not sure

if anyone can help me out here i would appreciate it very much! thanks

More about : recommend psu parts

a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 9:45:22 PM

Any chance of upgrading your graphics card anytime soon?

A good 400-500w unit will power your system no problem. Hell probably an Antec EA 380D can power that.

The heaviest load on the power supply usually comes from the graphics card but since you got a HTPC one that doesn't take in that much power....

here's a few suggestions.

Antec EA 380D
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Corsair CX 430 V2
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Seasonic S12II 520
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Antec HCG 520
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2011 11:47:18 PM

Are you set on that parts list? If it's budgetary concerns, I well understand and in that case any of the PSUs listed will be more than adequate.

I guess the first question is what you're planning to do with the system. An i7 seems like a lot of overkill paired with a Radeon 54xx. If you want a little extra longevity to the system, I'd recommend a Z68 mboard and a slightly beefier graphics card. You can get a very solid Z68 board for $120 and a Radeon 6850 for about $150, if that's in your price range. The extra threads on the i7 will only help in serious design and productivity software, not in current games. If you don't need the extra threads, save yourself $100 and get the i5-2500K and put the $100 towards a better graphics card or mboard.
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a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2011 12:41:18 AM

Before you buy any PSU you should read accurate, objective PSU reviews at reputable sites such as www.jonnyguru.com or www.hardwaresecrets.com on the EXACT model PSU that you are interested in as some brands have good and poor quality PSUs.

You can also get an accurate rating of how much PSU power is required for your current or future system at the PSU calculator link below. Once you know the total PSU watts required then you need to confirm that the 12v rail has enough amps. to support your Vid card(s) and the rest of the PC system.

There are several websites that show the Vid card power consumption in watts. Divide the watts by 12 to determine the amps. required on the 12v rail(s). Add 15 amps for the rest of the PC on the 12v rail and you now know the Minimum total 12v rail amps required under full load. It's best to have at least 5-10 amps. reserve on the 12v rail available under full load so the PSU is not loaded to 100%.

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-560-ti-sli-re...

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/NVIDIA/GeForce_GTX_5...
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September 21, 2011 9:07:44 AM

RedJaron said:
Are you set on that parts list? If it's budgetary concerns, I well understand and in that case any of the PSUs listed will be more than adequate.

I guess the first question is what you're planning to do with the system. An i7 seems like a lot of overkill paired with a Radeon 54xx. If you want a little extra longevity to the system, I'd recommend a Z68 mboard and a slightly beefier graphics card. You can get a very solid Z68 board for $120 and a Radeon 6850 for about $150, if that's in your price range. The extra threads on the i7 will only help in serious design and productivity software, not in current games. If you don't need the extra threads, save yourself $100 and get the i5-2500K and put the $100 towards a better graphics card or mboard.


I will be using this computer primarily for applications like maya, after effects, blender, etc. (no gaming)
im not set on the parts list; the video card is there because i already have it, and i havent been able to determine how much difference a better one would make. would a 6850 increase power consumption quite a bit? also, what is the advantage of a z68 mboard? thanks for the help
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Best solution

a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2011 7:19:32 PM

goselton said:
I will be using this computer primarily for applications like maya, after effects, blender, etc. (no gaming)
im not set on the parts list; the video card is there because i already have it, and i havent been able to determine how much difference a better one would make. would a 6850 increase power consumption quite a bit? also, what is the advantage of a z68 mboard? thanks for the help

I'm not sure, but I think Maya and the like will use the extra CPU threads of the i7 ( and if not the threads, than definitely the extra L3 cache, ) so that's good reason to stay there.

As for the Z68, well since you're not gaming, then no, there's not a real NEED for you to get one. Before the Z68, you had to get the P67 to overclock the Sandy Bridge or the H67 to really utilize the integrated graphics. The Z68 chipset lets you do both of these. Another big change was the support for using an SSD drive as a HDD cache ( which improves disk read performance, but no writes. ) But SSD caching is only useful for those people that can only afford small SSD drives. If you've got the money for a larger SSD, say 80 GB or bigger, it's generally best to use that as a system drive and the HDD for basic storage. Overall, with the price differences between P67 and Z68 dropping, there really isn't a reason to NOT get a newer board either.

On the graphics front, I really don't know how much a newer graphics card will help graphics production apps. I use Photoshop and though it will use some of the GPU, it still relies heavily on the CPU and RAM. Granted Maya is 3D and PS isn't so maybe it will benefit more from an advanced GPU. But any current card you buy will indeed step up the power requirements. Then again, the integrated graphics on the i7 are arguably better than your existing 5450 so you may not even need a new card. If you opt for this route, just be sure your mboard has enough video out ports for your use.

As for PSUs, beenthere gives some good advice. However that math is problematic for PSUs with more than one 12V rail ( many models have two - four now. ) Sometimes it's hard to know what power connectors are on what rail, so simply adding them up could potentially leave a component or two starved for power. If you check the PSU packaging, it should list the amps on each rail, so that you can get a better idea of how power is distributed among the rails. So long as each 12V rail has ~18A available on it, you'll be just fine. Be careful of the cheapo PSUs because they sometimes load up the amps on the 5V rail ( which very few components use, ) so they can advertise a 400W PSU that really only has 120W available on the 12V rail. Personally, I like the Asus PSU Calculator. It's not quite as detailed, but it's faster and gives you a good general idea.

You also mention cooling. If you're not overclocking this thing, most stock cooling should be adequate. Aftermarket cooling and fans can result in a quieter system, but you definitely won't need the actual cooling benefit.

Hope that helps. Any other questions?
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a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2011 9:06:15 PM

RedJaron said:


As for PSUs, beenthere gives some good advice. However that math is problematic for PSUs with more than one 12V rail ( many models have two - four now. ) Sometimes it's hard to know what power connectors are on what rail, so simply adding them up could potentially leave a component or two starved for power.


1. actually just about every PSU under 1000w has only one 12v rail, some OEMs/brands simply split that rail 2,3,4,5 x
2. you never add the amps on each split to get a total on the 12v rail. there should be a figure on the label that states "total 12v power 540w" or something similar. you then divide the rail into that figure to get the amps.
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a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2011 9:52:01 PM

dirtyferret said:
1. actually just about every PSU under 1000w has only one 12v rail, some OEMs/brands simply split that rail 2,3,4,5 x
2. you never add the amps on each split to get a total on the 12v rail. there should be a figure on the label that states "total 12v power 540w" or something similar. you then divide the rail into that figure to get the amps.

I didn't want to go into a lot of detail, but since you brought it up.

First, Antec, FSP, Rosewill, Cougar, Seasonic, Xigmatek, and Enermax all have PSUs in the 500W - 850W range listed as two, three, and four rails. Whether the +12V rail is actually physically split or not, the label ( and therefore marketing ) considers it to have multiple rails so most retailers will have them listed as such when searching for them.

Second, I expressly said NOT to add up the rail amperage.

Check Tom's Article on PSUs, and pay special attention to the label picture toward the bottom of the page ( between the be quiet! PSU and the el cheapo one. ) Now, each "rail" is rated at 18A, meaning each rail can supply 216W on its own, but all four together can only supply 41A, or 492W. So you can have two rails maxed out and be fine, but not all four. Same thing goes for my FSP Aurum powering my new build at home. Each of its four rails is rated at 18A, but the maximum draw altogether is 56A ( not 72A as you would get with straight addition. )

Goselton, just be sure to check the actual label on a PSU. If it's marked as a split rail, most quality PSUs will have similar amperage ratings across all of the +12V rails. And don't forget to check the +12V rail total output limits too.
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a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2011 10:06:26 PM

RedJaron said:
I didn't want to go into a lot of detail, but since you brought it up.

First, Antec, FSP, Rosewill, Cougar, Seasonic, Xigmatek, and Enermax all have PSUs in the 500W - 850W range listed as two, three, and four rails. Whether the +12V rail is actually physically split or not, the label ( and therefore marketing ) considers it to have multiple rails so most retailers will have them listed as such when searching for them.

Second, I expressly said NOT to add up the rail amperage.

Check Tom's Article on PSUs, and pay special attention to the label picture toward the bottom of the page ( between the be quiet! PSU and the el cheapo one. ) Now, each "rail" is rated at 18A, meaning each rail can supply 216W on its own, but all four together can only supply 41A, or 492W. So you can have two rails maxed out and be fine, but not all four. Same thing goes for my FSP Aurum powering my new build at home. Each of its four rails is rated at 18A, but the maximum draw altogether is 56A ( not 72A as you would get with straight addition. )

Goselton, just be sure to check the actual label on a PSU. If it's marked as a split rail, most quality PSUs will have similar amperage ratings across all of the +12V rails. And don't forget to check the +12V rail total output limits too.


none of this disproves that you where wrong on both counts listed above and I corrected your errors.
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a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2011 10:18:39 PM

dirtyferret said:
none of this disproves that you where wrong on both counts listed above and I corrected your errors.

Right, if it makes you feel better about yourself . . . Try reading it again. Or better yet, try helping the OP instead of trying to boost yourself with erroneous accusations.
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September 21, 2011 11:35:00 PM

Best answer selected by goselton.
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September 21, 2011 11:35:25 PM

thanks for all the help everyone!
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a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2011 11:40:58 PM

Thanks for Best Answer, glad I could be of assistance.
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