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Leave the battery in?

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 19, 2005 6:40:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I have a Clevo M27ES with a battery model M22BAT-9. The battery seems to
have finally bitten the dust and is not responding to recalibrating. It
drops to 8% to 10% within a few minutes, and when I plug the power adapter
in it stays there for several minutes and then rockets up to 100%. But it
still drops fast when the power is unplugged. I guess it's toasted and it's
not a major issue as I am on power most of the time. A replacement is listed
by the New Zealand supplier at $NZ278.49, so that's another reason why it's
not a major issue.

My question is this - it still seems to act as a sort of UPS for momentary
power dropouts. Is it OK for me to just leave it in the machine for this
purpose, or is it better to take it out? If the latter please what is the
best way to dispose of a dead LiOn battery?

Many thanks, Peter.

--
Peter in New Zealand. (Pull the plug out to reply.)
Collector of old cameras, tropical fish fancier, good coffee nutter, and
compulsive computer fiddler.

More about : leave battery

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 19, 2005 6:40:45 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 14:40:44 +1200, "Peter in New Zealand"
<peterbalplug@xtra.co.nz> wrote:

>I have a Clevo M27ES with a battery model M22BAT-9. The battery seems to
>have finally bitten the dust and is not responding to recalibrating. It
>drops to 8% to 10% within a few minutes, and when I plug the power adapter
>in it stays there for several minutes and then rockets up to 100%. But it
>still drops fast when the power is unplugged. I guess it's toasted and it's
>not a major issue as I am on power most of the time. A replacement is listed
>by the New Zealand supplier at $NZ278.49, so that's another reason why it's
>not a major issue.
>
>My question is this - it still seems to act as a sort of UPS for momentary
>power dropouts. Is it OK for me to just leave it in the machine for this
>purpose, or is it better to take it out?

Since the only reason to take it out is to avoid a premature death,
there's no reason now not to leave it in.

>If the latter please what is the
>best way to dispose of a dead LiOn battery?
>
Drop it off at a Radio Shack store.

>Many thanks, Peter.

Charlie Hoffpauir
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 19, 2005 9:43:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Thank you for your help. Taking it out involved removing screws and opening
part of the housing, so it wasn't the sort of thing that was easy or quick.
Unfortunately that may have shortened it's life I agree. I am not sure if we
have Radio Shack in New Zealand. Certainly there are none in the southern
towns and cities near where I live. There is a Dick Smith Electronics in
Dunedin, about an hour's drive away. Should I try them do you think? If no
one wants it at all what should I do with it please? I know they are not
really the sort of thing to toss into the general rubbish bin, but I am
unsure what to do.

Thanks for your help, Peter.

"Charlie Hoffpauir" <invalid@invalid.com> wrote in message
news:p mu9b1hcoo8isagso1mk18o514uqrvetgb@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 14:40:44 +1200, "Peter in New Zealand"
> <peterbalplug@xtra.co.nz> wrote:
>
>>I have a Clevo M27ES with a battery model M22BAT-9. The battery seems to
>>have finally bitten the dust and is not responding to recalibrating. It
>>drops to 8% to 10% within a few minutes, and when I plug the power adapter
>>in it stays there for several minutes and then rockets up to 100%. But it
>>still drops fast when the power is unplugged. I guess it's toasted and
>>it's
>>not a major issue as I am on power most of the time. A replacement is
>>listed
>>by the New Zealand supplier at $NZ278.49, so that's another reason why
>>it's
>>not a major issue.
>>
>>My question is this - it still seems to act as a sort of UPS for momentary
>>power dropouts. Is it OK for me to just leave it in the machine for this
>>purpose, or is it better to take it out?
>
> Since the only reason to take it out is to avoid a premature death,
> there's no reason now not to leave it in.
>
>>If the latter please what is the
>>best way to dispose of a dead LiOn battery?
>>
> Drop it off at a Radio Shack store.
>
>>Many thanks, Peter.
>
> Charlie Hoffpauir
> http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 19, 2005 9:43:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 17:43:15 +1200, "Peter in New Zealand"
<peterbalplug@xtra.co.nz> wrote:

>Thank you for your help. Taking it out involved removing screws and opening
>part of the housing, so it wasn't the sort of thing that was easy or quick.
>Unfortunately that may have shortened it's life I agree. I am not sure if we
>have Radio Shack in New Zealand. Certainly there are none in the southern
>towns and cities near where I live. There is a Dick Smith Electronics in
>Dunedin, about an hour's drive away. Should I try them do you think? If no
>one wants it at all what should I do with it please? I know they are not
>really the sort of thing to toss into the general rubbish bin, but I am
>unsure what to do.
>
>Thanks for your help, Peter.
>
"Most" retail stores that sell batteries will also take them in to
dispose of them properly. Just ask a few, I'm sure you can find one
locally.

Charlie Hoffpauir
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 20, 2005 5:16:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Peter in New Zealand" <peterbalplug@xtra.co.nz> wrote in message
news:ZW4te.8389$U4.1160733@news.xtra.co.nz...
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2005 14:40:44 +1200

... My question is this - it still seems to act as a sort of UPS
for momentary power dropouts. Is it OK for me to just leave it in
the machine for this purpose, or is it better to take it out?

Hi Peter... I've seen weak Li-Ion batteries behave nice to a laptop
until it won't last a few minutes on its own power. Then you wouldn't
believe the amount of heat the laptop will generate. I don't think the
battery is getting hot per se, but mostly rather the computer's charging
circuits are getting hot. I refuse to leave weak or dead batteries in a
laptop anymore.


Cheers!


___________________________________________
Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
-- written and edited within Word 2000
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 20, 2005 12:39:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Will do. Thank you for your help.

Regards, Peter.

"Charlie Hoffpauir" <invalid@invalid.com> wrote in message
news:D jvab1d4obaognf45e4fo59rpgvvo6tc1l@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 17:43:15 +1200, "Peter in New Zealand"
> <peterbalplug@xtra.co.nz> wrote:
>
>>Thank you for your help. Taking it out involved removing screws and
>>opening
>>part of the housing, so it wasn't the sort of thing that was easy or
>>quick.
>>Unfortunately that may have shortened it's life I agree. I am not sure if
>>we
>>have Radio Shack in New Zealand. Certainly there are none in the southern
>>towns and cities near where I live. There is a Dick Smith Electronics in
>>Dunedin, about an hour's drive away. Should I try them do you think? If no
>>one wants it at all what should I do with it please? I know they are not
>>really the sort of thing to toss into the general rubbish bin, but I am
>>unsure what to do.
>>
>>Thanks for your help, Peter.
>>
> "Most" retail stores that sell batteries will also take them in to
> dispose of them properly. Just ask a few, I'm sure you can find one
> locally.
>
> Charlie Hoffpauir
> http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
June 20, 2005 12:39:36 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Try calling your local government offices. They regulate such things and
should be able to tell you how to dispose of it. Most of the replies are
from the US and the regulations will be different. As for leaving it in or
out with LiIon batteries it doesn't make much difference. 1 to 2 years is
about all you will get. The charging circuits in today's laptops will
control the charge and will not overcharge the battery. Most information you
get here is outdated information that was valid in the old days with nicad
batteries and poor regulation in the laptops.........


"Peter in New Zealand" <peterbalplug@xtra.co.nz> wrote in message
news:qKkte.8541$U4.1173542@news.xtra.co.nz...
> Will do. Thank you for your help.
>
> Regards, Peter.
>
> "Charlie Hoffpauir" <invalid@invalid.com> wrote in message
> news:D jvab1d4obaognf45e4fo59rpgvvo6tc1l@4ax.com...
>> On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 17:43:15 +1200, "Peter in New Zealand"
>> <peterbalplug@xtra.co.nz> wrote:
>>
>>>Thank you for your help. Taking it out involved removing screws and
>>>opening
>>>part of the housing, so it wasn't the sort of thing that was easy or
>>>quick.
>>>Unfortunately that may have shortened it's life I agree. I am not sure if
>>>we
>>>have Radio Shack in New Zealand. Certainly there are none in the southern
>>>towns and cities near where I live. There is a Dick Smith Electronics in
>>>Dunedin, about an hour's drive away. Should I try them do you think? If
>>>no
>>>one wants it at all what should I do with it please? I know they are not
>>>really the sort of thing to toss into the general rubbish bin, but I am
>>>unsure what to do.
>>>
>>>Thanks for your help, Peter.
>>>
>> "Most" retail stores that sell batteries will also take them in to
>> dispose of them properly. Just ask a few, I'm sure you can find one
>> locally.
>>
>> Charlie Hoffpauir
>> http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 20, 2005 12:39:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Woody" <TheDuck@pond.net> wrote in message
news:utnte.280$re.117@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2005 23:46:34 GMT

... As for leaving it in or out with LiIon batteries it doesn't
make much difference. 1 to 2 years is about all you will get...

Barry Watzman and I are getting 10 years and counting on our Li-Ion
batteries. The ones that I have left in only last 1 or 2 years. Some of
us believe leaving the battery in all of the time causes the Li-Ion
battery to heat up while the laptop heats up (even if it isn't being
charged at the time). Thus it slowly bakes like cookies.


Cheers!


___________________________________________
Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
-- written and edited within Word 2000
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 20, 2005 12:39:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

That is simply not true. Properly cared for, Litium batteries can last
the better part of, if not more than a decade. But there is tremendous
annectodotal evidence that leaving them in a laptop when it's
continually plugged into AC power will destroy them in 9 to 24 months.

Batteries are for portable operation away from AC power. If you need a
UPS, get a UPS for $30, instead of destroying a $200+ lithium battery.


Woody wrote:

1 to 2 years is about all you will get.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 20, 2005 1:11:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:42B639BE.1050502@neo.rr.com...
> That is simply not true. Properly cared for, Litium batteries can last
> the better part of, if not more than a decade. But there is tremendous
> annectodotal evidence that leaving them in a laptop when it's
> continually plugged into AC power will destroy them in 9 to 24 months.
>

Ni-Cad batteries were certainly slowly destroyed by overcharging when left
in a laptop. This simply does not happen with a Li-ion battery - just as
well, because an overcharged Li-ion battery explosively destructs. However
as others have noted, Li-ion batteries do not like heat. Far too many
laptops put the batteries too close to the major heat producing parts.
Elevated temperatures will destroy Li-ion batteries in a couple of years,
even if they are otherwise unused.

> Batteries are for portable operation away from AC power. If you need a
> UPS, get a UPS for $30, instead of destroying a $200+ lithium battery.
>

This makes perfect sense.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 20, 2005 1:49:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Peter in New Zealand" <peterbalplug@xtra.co.nz> wrote:

>I have a Clevo M27ES with a battery model M22BAT-9. The battery seems to
>have finally bitten the dust and is not responding to recalibrating. It
>drops to 8% to 10% within a few minutes, and when I plug the power adapter
>in it stays there for several minutes and then rockets up to 100%. But it
>still drops fast when the power is unplugged. I guess it's toasted and it's
>not a major issue as I am on power most of the time. A replacement is listed
>by the New Zealand supplier at $NZ278.49, so that's another reason why it's
>not a major issue.
>
>My question is this - it still seems to act as a sort of UPS for momentary
>power dropouts. Is it OK for me to just leave it in the machine for this
>purpose, or is it better to take it out? If the latter please what is the
>best way to dispose of a dead LiOn battery?
>
>Many thanks, Peter.

As long as the laptop is not continually trying to charge the battery it
should be safe to leave it in.

--
Tom in Lower Hutt
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 21, 2005 2:33:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Thanks heaps to everyone for your replies and suggestions. Taking the
overall feeling I think I'll take the battery out of the machine. It's
certainly no use for powering it any more. I've had about two and a half
years out of it. I'll get onto our local council office and see if they have
anything regarding hazardous waste disposal. A UPS is a little more
expensive than that. As the power pack supplies raw 20 volts DC and all
regulation seems to be done in the laptop itself maybe a couple of small
external batteries would be an adequate UPS. Anyway, once again many thanks
to you all for your help. It;s greatly appreciated.

--
Peter in New Zealand. (Pull the plug out to reply.)
Collector of old cameras, tropical fish fancier, good coffee nutter, and
compulsive computer fiddler.



"BillW50" <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote in message
news:vNote.170$Y75.30@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...

"Peter in New Zealand" <peterbalplug@xtra.co.nz> wrote in message
news:ZW4te.8389$U4.1160733@news.xtra.co.nz...
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2005 14:40:44 +1200

... My question is this - it still seems to act as a sort of UPS
for momentary power dropouts. Is it OK for me to just leave it in
the machine for this purpose, or is it better to take it out?

Hi Peter... I've seen weak Li-Ion batteries behave nice to a laptop
until it won't last a few minutes on its own power. Then you wouldn't
believe the amount of heat the laptop will generate. I don't think the
battery is getting hot per se, but mostly rather the computer's charging
circuits are getting hot. I refuse to leave weak or dead batteries in a
laptop anymore.


Cheers!


___________________________________________
Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
-- written and edited within Word 2000
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 21, 2005 2:55:46 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:
> That is simply not true. Properly cared for, Litium batteries can last
> the better part of, if not more than a decade. But there is tremendous
> annectodotal evidence that leaving them in a laptop when it's
> continually plugged into AC power will destroy them in 9 to 24 months.
>
> Batteries are for portable operation away from AC power. If you need a
> UPS, get a UPS for $30, instead of destroying a $200+ lithium battery.

Hi Barry, what do you suggest is better when you're back at base?

1. Leave battery in, but connect/turn on AC power only when the laptop
is actually on.

2. Remove the battery and only insert it when you're going mobile.

I did notice my Toshiba Satellite manual mentioned that the AC power
supply should not be left connected for more than a few hours after the
battery is fully charged, which surprised me a little. Surely it would
have a regulation circuit to prevent overcharging? Anyway, since I saw
that I have been doing (1) above.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 21, 2005 4:04:28 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 22:33:11 +1200, "Peter in New Zealand"
<peterbalplug@xtra.co.nz> wrote:

>I'll get onto our local council office and see if they have
>anything regarding hazardous waste disposal.


What, nuZeelanders are not into recycling??!!!

If u don't want to deal with it now, just place it in your dead
battery box, along with your spent AA, AAA, coins and what not, they
add up after awhile. Then turn them in after u got a pile and found a
proper venue for disposal.

And don't forget all your expired pills, turn them in to the phamacy
too.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 22, 2005 1:27:32 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Not that we don't like to be into recycling, but in smaller centres like my
town (approx. pop. = 450 to 500) there's just nothing like that 'cause it's
uneconomic. Might try next time I go through to Dunedin. Anyway, can't you
tell we're deeply into recycling? After all we seem to recycling the same
tired old govt. term after term after term at the moment. Oh blast! And I
swore I wouldn't git politically incorrect about this thing. Must be the
election coming up later this year. Anyway, I dunno how you would recycle a
dead LiOn battery. Can they be remanufactured somehow?
--
Peter in New Zealand. (Pull the plug out to reply.)
Collector of old cameras, tropical fish fancier, good coffee nutter, and
compulsive computer fiddler.

"bobb" <None@NoWhere.com> wrote in message
news:D eefb1dmd77td46khu98j280eegmakhjuh@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 22:33:11 +1200, "Peter in New Zealand"
> <peterbalplug@xtra.co.nz> wrote:
>
>>I'll get onto our local council office and see if they have
>>anything regarding hazardous waste disposal.
>
>
> What, nuZeelanders are not into recycling??!!!
>
> If u don't want to deal with it now, just place it in your dead
> battery box, along with your spent AA, AAA, coins and what not, they
> add up after awhile. Then turn them in after u got a pile and found a
> proper venue for disposal.
>
> And don't forget all your expired pills, turn them in to the phamacy
> too.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 22, 2005 3:04:46 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

No, remove the battery.


googlegroups@sensation.net.au wrote:
> Barry Watzman wrote:
>
>>That is simply not true. Properly cared for, Litium batteries can last
>>the better part of, if not more than a decade. But there is tremendous
>>annectodotal evidence that leaving them in a laptop when it's
>>continually plugged into AC power will destroy them in 9 to 24 months.
>>
>>Batteries are for portable operation away from AC power. If you need a
>>UPS, get a UPS for $30, instead of destroying a $200+ lithium battery.
>
>
> Hi Barry, what do you suggest is better when you're back at base?
>
> 1. Leave battery in, but connect/turn on AC power only when the laptop
> is actually on.
>
> 2. Remove the battery and only insert it when you're going mobile.
>
> I did notice my Toshiba Satellite manual mentioned that the AC power
> supply should not be left connected for more than a few hours after the
> battery is fully charged, which surprised me a little. Surely it would
> have a regulation circuit to prevent overcharging? Anyway, since I saw
> that I have been doing (1) above.
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 22, 2005 6:03:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

In article <42B945CF.1020805@neo.rr.com>, WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com
says...
> No, remove the battery.

Which isn't always practical - for example on the Dell Latitude L400 the
battery forms part of the casing. When removed the whole machine moves
when you are using the touchpad.

--
AG

Remove removes from address to remove anti-spam measures.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
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