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New Gaming Build

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June 29, 2011 10:50:57 PM

how is this build??

http://i51.tinypic.com/dblaoo.png

Does everything work together? Will it run well?

More about : gaming build

June 29, 2011 11:29:47 PM

Should work together fine, but...

I see no need to go with a P67 board if you don't intend to SLI or didn't bother selecting a CPU (the i5-2500K) that can be overclocked. A more basic H61 board would suffice in such a situation, and save a lot of money in the process.
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June 30, 2011 3:06:07 AM

Well, I was thinking of something more along the lines of this $60 board: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I suppose I really just wanted you to know that there are far less-expensive boards available that may suit your needs. The H67 board you selected as an alternative is a nice board, but doesn't really offer too much in terms of necessary features for a simple build. But I don't really know what features you actually need from a motherboard.
June 30, 2011 3:58:43 AM

A 2500K is only "worth it" if it's user is willing to overclock it. Otherwise, the 2400 is usually "enough." Plus, a 2500K requires a P67 or Z68 motherboard. An expense I was attempting to explain may not be necessary.

The current price of that GTX460 is $189.99, not $209.99, so the jump in price to a 560Ti is $60, not $40. But, there are some nice GTX460's in the $160 range you could consider as well, with some dropping as low as $130 w/ their mail-in rebates. That's something I'd consider.

Troy, maybe it's best you explain what you really need this PC to do. That would help us figure out what selections may need adjustment and why.
June 30, 2011 4:07:35 AM

RazberyBandit said:
A 2500K is only "worth it" if it's user is willing to overclock it. Otherwise, the 2400 is usually "enough." Plus, a 2500K requires a P67 or Z68 motherboard. An expense I was attempting to explain may not be necessary.

The current price of that GTX460 is $189.99, not $209.99, so the jump in price to a 560Ti is $60, not $40. But, there are some nice GTX460's in the $160 range you could consider as well, with some dropping as low as $130 w/ their mail-in rebates. That's something I'd consider.

Troy, maybe it's best you explain what you really need this PC to do. That would help us figure out what selections may need adjustment and why.



well personally i think everything I have in my first build is want i want i was just making sure everything was compatible with each other. :D 
June 30, 2011 4:16:56 AM

In that case, yes, it's all compatible and the system should function fine. But, there's simply room for changes. The "hows and whys" for any changes others may recommend should be based upon your computing needs, though, not their own personal preferences.
June 30, 2011 4:56:05 AM

Well should I change anything, and if so why should I change it?
June 30, 2011 6:55:47 AM

It depends on what you want this PC to do, and what potential upgrade paths you may desire in the future.

The example I've already given regarding motherboard selection is just one variable. H61 and H67 boards limit you to CPUs that can't be OC'd and only support single-GPU graphics solutions. P67 and Z68 offer the ability to OC Intel "K-series" CPUs and support multi-GPU graphics solutions. And each model motherboard within the selections available of each chipset will offer different features, such as different expansion slots and their layout. Slot layout can effect the cooling effectiveness of the 2nd card in a dual-GPU graphics solution.

Maybe I'm just delving too deeply into details that you're simply not concerned with...
June 30, 2011 3:14:24 PM

you should upgrade the video card to a 560ti. about the same price, and well worth the extra performance
July 1, 2011 12:06:27 AM

how about this razbery bandit could you do a setup for me that has an i5, nvidia video card, and 8 gb ram for around the same price because i DONT want to overclock and if u think i can get it for way cheaper then im all aboard


The 560 ti is 60 dollars more that isnt the same price..
July 1, 2011 1:44:14 AM

I have to guess the system's main purpose would be gaming then...? A system builder has to know a client's usage needs in order to provide a proper product that fits them. Not that I perceive you as a client... I just worded it like that to prove the point.

And it's not like your original choices are bad in any way. I said originally it would all work together just fine. But, one has to consider it's applied use, intended longevity, and other factors when making a final decision. Now that I've actually managed to find the words to express those needs, maybe you can help fill-in the blanks. Besides it's intended use and longevity, another such blank is what resolution monitor will the system be used with. That alone is a major factor when deciding a system's required graphics horsepower.

As for rexxer's 560Ti recommendation, he based it on the price difference. But, since creating that Wish List, the eVGA 460 you chose dropped to $190, so the difference between it and a 560Ti isn't $40, it's $60. Additionally, there are actually cheaper GTX460 1GB cards anyway. (Several are $160-ish, and drop to $130 or so w/ rebates.)
July 2, 2011 3:04:27 AM

OK I DID IT! im getting the 560 ti :D  60 bucks worth it imo, anything else i should do?
July 2, 2011 5:03:16 AM

PSU. I'd go with something like the Antec Neo-Eco 620 instead of that Corsair Builder-series one. It's on sale this weekend for about the same price as the Corsair. Just be sure to apply the coupon code!!!
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Other than that, it's just motherboard selection, really. P67 boards can offer SLI potential down the road, but H61 & H67 can't. P67 would also allow you to upgrade to a K-series CPU should you decide you want one.

You might want to look into some of the Combo offers on certain products. Here's a link to all the combos for the i5-2400: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductCombos.aspx?Item=N...
I'm sure you can find a combo there that can save a few bucks. And you'd be wise to look into combos for other individual items as well.
July 2, 2011 5:22:57 AM

RazberyBandit said:
PSU. I'd go with something like the Antec Neo-Eco 620 instead of that Corsair Builder-series one. It's on sale this weekend for about the same price as the Corsair. Just be sure to apply the coupon code!!!
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Other than that, it's just motherboard selection, really. P67 boards can offer SLI potential down the road, but H61 & H67 can't. P67 would also allow you to upgrade to a K-series CPU should you decide you want one.

You might want to look into some of the Combo offers on certain products. Here's a link to all the combos for the i5-2400: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductCombos.aspx?Item=N...
I'm sure you can find a combo there that can save a few bucks. And you'd be wise to look into combos for other individual items as well.



is there a reason BESIDES THE PRICE that i should change PSUs just wondering
July 2, 2011 5:40:55 AM

Not really... It does offer more available power for the same money, but you don't truly need that extra headroom, either.
July 2, 2011 5:46:49 AM

Yeh the reason I ask is because I wont be able to buy till after that code goes away xD
July 2, 2011 5:58:04 AM

wat is the z68 sandyBBBBB?
July 2, 2011 7:06:50 AM

I'd suggest ignoring USMC-FURY. Most of the stuff he's listed is way beyond budget, unnecessarily over-powered (PSU-wise), or just plain unnecessary. And future-proof? Are you kidding me? There's no such thing... Systems don't require more power and more power year after year, so A 900+W PSU for this system is ridiculous. Continued die-shrinks and increased power efficiency have created a balance when it comes to power consumption.

Z68 enables things like overclocking, SLI/CrossFireX, SSD caching, and with Lucid Logix tech, Sandy Bridge hardware trans-coding while using a discrete GPU. Not gonna use any of that right? So no use worrying about Z68... Moving on.

I already went over the differences between H61, H67, and P67.
July 2, 2011 7:51:38 AM

i cant seem to see where u explained the difference between the H61 and H67, I just see where you explained the difference of the H61/H67 and P67. Could you pleas explain difference of the H61 and H67
July 2, 2011 8:05:42 AM

Quote:
H61 vs. H67: the H61 is cheaper because it has fewer USBs (10 vs. 14), fewer SATA3 (4 vs. 6) and it has no SATA6, so if you want to go SSD later on your stuck. It also has fewer PCIe lanes (6 vs. 8), no RAID. And, of course, there is no GPU boost on the H61.


Best budget:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Why build backwards? $60-$70 to get ur ( T ) kicked gaming, or $99.99 to be right in there! ;)  DO NOT BUILD BACKWARDS !!!!!!!



can u stfu seriously you are annoying
July 2, 2011 8:11:22 AM

Quote:
HEY DOOSH! THEN DONT *F*ing ASSk, throw ur $ away for a Dinosaur! NOOB!

"i cant seem to see where u explained the difference between the H61 and H67, I just see where you explained the difference of the H61/H67 and P67. Could you pleas explain difference of the H61 and H67."



i wasnt asking u first off and second off quit spamming to get the z68
July 2, 2011 9:52:14 AM

Well he did nail the deeper 61 and 67 differences. I should have gone into more detail.

H61 would actually work fine, but you do have somewhat limited upgrades later. It's the H61's 4 SATA ports which is the major limitation. 4 is the absolute bare-minimum in that regard, so H67 would be the better choice in the end should you ever want to add more storage or optical drives later.

As for the SATA-III argument, most SSD's still can't saturate SATA-II. Only the really high-end ones use the bandwidth SATA-III opens up.

And USB? As if 10 vs 14 USB ports is really an issue... I've got a 10-port hub that only uses one of those up.

I hadn't mentioned this yet... With the 2500K CPU only $30 more than the 2400, I can't help but wonder what it might be about overclocking that you don't find interesting or attractive.
July 2, 2011 9:59:23 AM

RazberyBandit said:
Well he did nail the deeper 61 and 67 differences. I should have gone into more detail.

H61 would actually work fine, but you do have somewhat limited upgrades later. It's the H61's 4 SATA ports which is the major limitation. 4 is the absolute bare-minimum in that regard, so H67 would be the better choice in the end should you ever want to add more storage or optical drives later.

As for the SATA-III argument, most SSD's still can't saturate SATA-II. Only the really high-end ones use the bandwidth SATA-III opens up.

And USB? As if 10 vs 14 USB ports is really an issue... I've got a 10-port hub that only uses one of those up.

I hadn't mentioned this yet... With the 2500K CPU only $30 more than the 2400, I can't help but wonder what it might be about overclocking that you don't find interesting or attractive.


first gaming pc ever dont want to overclock just want 2400 i5 and trying to decide between h61 and h67
July 2, 2011 10:08:37 AM

Then I have to think about this from the perspective of building it for someone who won't give it all the tweaking and tender-loving goodness those tweaks sometimes require that I'd provide. Kinda like building for my kid brother - needs to work really well and not need checking-up on.

I'd choose H67, if only for the reason that H61's 4 SATA ports is truly an absolute bare minimum. That would mean 2 HDDs with 2 optical drives, or 3 HDDs with 1 optical drive, maximum, forever. That might be enough for you, though. But if SSDs continue to get faster and drop in price, a year from now you might actually get one for less than $4/GB that can actually make use of SATA-III's additional bandwidth.
July 2, 2011 10:14:26 AM

RazberyBandit said:
Then I have to think about this from the perspective of building it for someone who won't give it all the tweaking and tender-loving goodness those tweaks sometimes require that I'd provide. Kinda like building for my kid brother - needs to work really well and not need checking-up on.

I'd choose H67, if only for the reason that H61's 4 SATA ports is truly an absolute bare minimum. That would mean 2 HDDs with 2 optical drives, or 3 HDDs with 1 optical drive, maximum, forever. That might be enough for you, though. But if SSDs continue to get faster and drop in price, a year from now you might actually get one for less than $4/GB that can actually make use of SATA-III's additional bandwidth.



ohhh you are right because SDDS in 2 years will be so cheap everyone will have em and i wont be able to get one really with a H61 so i should get a H67 can you link me a good H67?
July 2, 2011 10:34:46 AM

There aren't many full-size ATX boards, but MSI, Intel and Gigabyte each make a good one. In that order:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

P.S. And don't worry about the MSI having a 2-egg score. One guy obviously doesn't know wtf he's talking about, and the other 1-egged it cause he claims it was DOA.

Edit: If you go Micro-ATX, their are plenty of other options. Only thing you really lose going Micro-ATX is 2 PCIe X1 slots and two PCI slots, or 1 PCIe X1 slot or 3 PCI slots. (For expansion cards.)
July 2, 2011 10:36:29 AM

RazberyBandit said:
There aren't many full-size ATX boards, but MSI, Intel and Gigabyte each make a good one. In that order:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

If you go Micro-ATX, their are plenty of other options.

P.S. And don't worry about the MSI having a 2-egg score. One guy obviously doesn't know wtf he's talking about, and the other 1-egged it cause he claims it was DOA.



whats the difference between full size ATX and micro?
July 2, 2011 10:41:45 AM

Hehe. You caught me editing... I was adding Micro details! :) 

Micro is shorter - about 3 inches - and only has 4 expansion card slots.
July 2, 2011 11:06:46 AM

I usually love ASUS boards. But I dunno about that one... There are quite a few issues listed within some of Newegg's reviews. But, plenty of H67 and P67 boards seem to have similar complaints along with lots of good ones. Sounds as though many of these boards may still be going through some BIOS teething pains.

I'll see if I can dig up more info on it tomorrow.
July 2, 2011 11:13:22 AM

yes please do c ya tomorrow
July 2, 2011 10:08:40 PM

It's a decent board as well. Really, you can't go wrong with any of the boards either of us has linked or considered previously. They'll all do what you need them to do. It's really just a matter of taste, expansion slot needs, and perhaps brand preference.

I keep looking for boards that offer combos to try and save a little cash, but there aren't many. But the ASUS board I had concerns about does have some combos, which includes two different ASUS GTX560Ti's.
July 2, 2011 10:35:44 PM

im actually going to change all together... Im going to get the 2500k. Now I need to find a mobo to go with it...
July 2, 2011 10:46:30 PM

LOL Man! I gotta ask... what changed your mind?
July 2, 2011 10:59:26 PM

idk i see all these people with the same build as me but 2500k instead
July 2, 2011 11:20:55 PM

did you ever look for more stuff on the h67 asus board just in case i get 2400 i5
July 3, 2011 2:37:37 AM

I looked for more info on the P8P67M-PRO/CSM, but didn't find any website reviews for it. That doesn't shock me, though. It's pretty rare to find reviews for almost all entry-level and mid-range boards.

And yeah, a lot of people will choose the 2500K because it's only another $30. That $30 gets you a CPU that can overclock into the 4.5GHz range fairly easily. Even if you don't overclock now, you might find it valuable to have the potential down the road. Who knows? A year or two from now you might want, or even need, that added CPU horsepower for some game or program. You could then install an aftermarket CPU cooler on it and go to town.

From the beginning, you clearly said you didn't want to overclock. As such, I never bothered trying to change your mind. Consider the above my reason why you may want a 2500K - down the road potential.
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