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Restoring HP Pavilion? ? ?

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June 22, 2005 3:10:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Recently I bought a HP Pavillion ZE5375US laptop which is quite good with
one exception: The previous owner customized the HDD in a way that I don't
like.

Chiefly, the HDD seems to be partitioned so that Windows XP home is loaded
into both the C and the D drives. I'm sure this has something to do with
"partitioning," which I've never understood.

Also some of the main components of the original configuration are missing.

I reinstalled Windows XP from scratch, but it didn't correct the problem.
Still have two active drives.

In addition to the Operating System disc, I have four recovery discs that
came with the laptop. These have never been opened.

I'm sure there must be some way to restore the laptop to the way it was when
it came out of the factory. Any guidance on how to do this will be
appreciated. Please keep it simple. Thanks.

More about : restoring pavilion

June 22, 2005 7:34:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Ray <rayj.balt@verizondelethis.net> wrote:
: Recently I bought a HP Pavillion ZE5375US laptop which is quite good with
: one exception: The previous owner customized the HDD in a way that I don't
: like.

: Chiefly, the HDD seems to be partitioned so that Windows XP home is loaded
: into both the C and the D drives. I'm sure this has something to do with
: "partitioning," which I've never understood.

Partitioning is merely splitting a physical hard drive into smaller
parts. Suppose you wanted a 25GB drive and a separate 15GB drive.
You could just use one 40GB drive and split it into two. There are
good reasons for doing this. For one, you might want to install two
operating systems on the same physical hard drive. Maybe you want
Windows 98 and Windows XP on separate installs but you want to share
data between them - then you would make three partitions, one for 98,
one for XP, and one for data and programs.

For most people a single partition makes sense, though. You should
try to combine the partitions together. I don't know why he had XP on
both partitions, but there are reasons. Maybe it wasn't originally
that way?

: Also some of the main components of the original configuration are missing.

: I reinstalled Windows XP from scratch, but it didn't correct the problem.
: Still have two active drives.

One recovery disk should have Windows on it. Are you saying you have a
separate disk from Microsoft with the Windows install on it (and you
had to type in a key to activate Windows XP)? If recovery disks have
Windows XP on them you might want to use those instead of the regular
Windows disk.

Windows lets you blow away old partitions and re-format your drive
before your install. Did you not do that because you have files and
programs on the original partition that you don't want to lose?

Programs like Partition Magic will allow you to shrink and combine
partitions. You'd start by erasing files in the 2nd partition (if
that's OK) and blowing away the 2nd partition, then using a Partition
Magic-like program to enlarge the first partition to use the free
space.

: In addition to the Operating System disc, I have four recovery discs that
: came with the laptop. These have never been opened.

: I'm sure there must be some way to restore the laptop to the way it was when
: it came out of the factory. Any guidance on how to do this will be
: appreciated. Please keep it simple. Thanks.

It should be very easy if you are willing to wipe the hard drive
completely and lose everything. Just use the recovery CDs to
re-install Windows and delete all partitions as part of the install.
If you don't want to lose everything, use Partition Magic as described
above.

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
*******************************************************************
----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
*******************************************************************
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 22, 2005 7:57:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Ray" <rayj.balt@verizonDELETHIS.net> wrote in message
news:xGbue.3661$dN.659@trnddc04...
> Recently I bought a HP Pavillion ZE5375US laptop which is quite good with
> one exception: The previous owner customized the HDD in a way that I don't
> like.
>
> Chiefly, the HDD seems to be partitioned so that Windows XP home is loaded
> into both the C and the D drives. I'm sure this has something to do with
> "partitioning," which I've never understood.
>
> Also some of the main components of the original configuration are
missing.
>
> I reinstalled Windows XP from scratch, but it didn't correct the problem.
> Still have two active drives.
>
> In addition to the Operating System disc, I have four recovery discs that
> came with the laptop. These have never been opened.
>
> I'm sure there must be some way to restore the laptop to the way it was
when
> it came out of the factory. Any guidance on how to do this will be
> appreciated. Please keep it simple. Thanks.
>

Run the recovery disks (Disk 1 should be bootable). This will^h^h^h^h
should restore the factory supplied disk image. If you have access to a
spare hard disk drive, it may be prudent to try it out first, because once
you start, there is no way back unless you have the software to make an
image of the disk you have.
Related resources
June 23, 2005 2:08:08 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Thanks for the detailed answer, Andrew --

What is peculiar is that both the C and the D drives contain Windows XP --
an unnecessary redundancy, it would seem to me.

The original definitely was a single drive, because I have an identical
laptop which I bought new.

There is a separate Windows XP install disc in addition to the four HP
recovery discs.

I definitely have no need for disc space. I'd just like to have the damn
thing the way it came out of the factory. But I don't know how to get rid of
that damned partition.

-- Ray
"Andrew" <usenetMYSHOES@bizaveMYSHOES.com> wrote in message
news:cacaxcrkrhj68224645634611@bizaveMYSHOES.com...
> Ray <rayj.balt@verizondelethis.net> wrote:
> : Recently I bought a HP Pavillion ZE5375US laptop which is quite good
> with
> : one exception: The previous owner customized the HDD in a way that I
> don't
> : like.
>
> : Chiefly, the HDD seems to be partitioned so that Windows XP home is
> loaded
> : into both the C and the D drives. I'm sure this has something to do with
> : "partitioning," which I've never understood.
>
> Partitioning is merely splitting a physical hard drive into smaller
> parts. Suppose you wanted a 25GB drive and a separate 15GB drive.
> You could just use one 40GB drive and split it into two. There are
> good reasons for doing this. For one, you might want to install two
> operating systems on the same physical hard drive. Maybe you want
> Windows 98 and Windows XP on separate installs but you want to share
> data between them - then you would make three partitions, one for 98,
> one for XP, and one for data and programs.
>
> For most people a single partition makes sense, though. You should
> try to combine the partitions together. I don't know why he had XP on
> both partitions, but there are reasons. Maybe it wasn't originally
> that way?
>
> : Also some of the main components of the original configuration are
> missing.
>
> : I reinstalled Windows XP from scratch, but it didn't correct the
> problem.
> : Still have two active drives.
>
> One recovery disk should have Windows on it. Are you saying you have a
> separate disk from Microsoft with the Windows install on it (and you
> had to type in a key to activate Windows XP)? If recovery disks have
> Windows XP on them you might want to use those instead of the regular
> Windows disk.
>
> Windows lets you blow away old partitions and re-format your drive
> before your install. Did you not do that because you have files and
> programs on the original partition that you don't want to lose?
>
> Programs like Partition Magic will allow you to shrink and combine
> partitions. You'd start by erasing files in the 2nd partition (if
> that's OK) and blowing away the 2nd partition, then using a Partition
> Magic-like program to enlarge the first partition to use the free
> space.
>
> : In addition to the Operating System disc, I have four recovery discs
> that
> : came with the laptop. These have never been opened.
>
> : I'm sure there must be some way to restore the laptop to the way it was
> when
> : it came out of the factory. Any guidance on how to do this will be
> : appreciated. Please keep it simple. Thanks.
>
> It should be very easy if you are willing to wipe the hard drive
> completely and lose everything. Just use the recovery CDs to
> re-install Windows and delete all partitions as part of the install.
> If you don't want to lose everything, use Partition Magic as described
> above.
>
> Andrew
> --
> ----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
> *******************************************************************
> ----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
> ----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
> *******************************************************************
>
June 23, 2005 3:15:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

The second partition may contain a copy of the Windows xp disk.
I use this system on my desktop to run xp from so I don't get the 'please
insert your windows xp cd' message.
Although i agree on a laptop it is not that nescessary.
using fdisk from a boot cd or floppy will solve the 2 partions and then you
can run your recovery disk to re-install all your original programs.
Mikey

"Ray" <rayj.balt@verizonDELETHIS.net> wrote in message
news:cjlue.13459$tG.6830@trnddc05...
> Thanks for the detailed answer, Andrew --
>
> What is peculiar is that both the C and the D drives contain Windows XP --
> an unnecessary redundancy, it would seem to me.
>
> The original definitely was a single drive, because I have an identical
> laptop which I bought new.
>
> There is a separate Windows XP install disc in addition to the four HP
> recovery discs.
>
> I definitely have no need for disc space. I'd just like to have the damn
> thing the way it came out of the factory. But I don't know how to get rid
> of that damned partition.
>
> -- Ray
> "Andrew" <usenetMYSHOES@bizaveMYSHOES.com> wrote in message
> news:cacaxcrkrhj68224645634611@bizaveMYSHOES.com...
>> Ray <rayj.balt@verizondelethis.net> wrote:
>> : Recently I bought a HP Pavillion ZE5375US laptop which is quite good
>> with
>> : one exception: The previous owner customized the HDD in a way that I
>> don't
>> : like.
>>
>> : Chiefly, the HDD seems to be partitioned so that Windows XP home is
>> loaded
>> : into both the C and the D drives. I'm sure this has something to do
>> with
>> : "partitioning," which I've never understood.
>>
>> Partitioning is merely splitting a physical hard drive into smaller
>> parts. Suppose you wanted a 25GB drive and a separate 15GB drive.
>> You could just use one 40GB drive and split it into two. There are
>> good reasons for doing this. For one, you might want to install two
>> operating systems on the same physical hard drive. Maybe you want
>> Windows 98 and Windows XP on separate installs but you want to share
>> data between them - then you would make three partitions, one for 98,
>> one for XP, and one for data and programs.
>>
>> For most people a single partition makes sense, though. You should
>> try to combine the partitions together. I don't know why he had XP on
>> both partitions, but there are reasons. Maybe it wasn't originally
>> that way?
>>
>> : Also some of the main components of the original configuration are
>> missing.
>>
>> : I reinstalled Windows XP from scratch, but it didn't correct the
>> problem.
>> : Still have two active drives.
>>
>> One recovery disk should have Windows on it. Are you saying you have a
>> separate disk from Microsoft with the Windows install on it (and you
>> had to type in a key to activate Windows XP)? If recovery disks have
>> Windows XP on them you might want to use those instead of the regular
>> Windows disk.
>>
>> Windows lets you blow away old partitions and re-format your drive
>> before your install. Did you not do that because you have files and
>> programs on the original partition that you don't want to lose?
>>
>> Programs like Partition Magic will allow you to shrink and combine
>> partitions. You'd start by erasing files in the 2nd partition (if
>> that's OK) and blowing away the 2nd partition, then using a Partition
>> Magic-like program to enlarge the first partition to use the free
>> space.
>>
>> : In addition to the Operating System disc, I have four recovery discs
>> that
>> : came with the laptop. These have never been opened.
>>
>> : I'm sure there must be some way to restore the laptop to the way it was
>> when
>> : it came out of the factory. Any guidance on how to do this will be
>> : appreciated. Please keep it simple. Thanks.
>>
>> It should be very easy if you are willing to wipe the hard drive
>> completely and lose everything. Just use the recovery CDs to
>> re-install Windows and delete all partitions as part of the install.
>> If you don't want to lose everything, use Partition Magic as described
>> above.
>>
>> Andrew
>> --
>> ----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
>> *******************************************************************
>> ----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
>> ----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
>> *******************************************************************
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 23, 2005 5:22:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

You can make a DOS diskette or bootable CD on a system with Windows 98,
put FDISK on it, and FDISK can delete partitions. There is an option
during installation to create partitions.

The best way to do this is probably with "Partition Magic", which can do
just about anything with partitions.


Ray wrote:
> Thanks for the detailed answer, Andrew --
>
> What is peculiar is that both the C and the D drives contain Windows XP --
> an unnecessary redundancy, it would seem to me.
>
> The original definitely was a single drive, because I have an identical
> laptop which I bought new.
>
> There is a separate Windows XP install disc in addition to the four HP
> recovery discs.
>
> I definitely have no need for disc space. I'd just like to have the damn
> thing the way it came out of the factory. But I don't know how to get rid of
> that damned partition.
>
> -- Ray
> "Andrew" <usenetMYSHOES@bizaveMYSHOES.com> wrote in message
> news:cacaxcrkrhj68224645634611@bizaveMYSHOES.com...
>
>>Ray <rayj.balt@verizondelethis.net> wrote:
>>: Recently I bought a HP Pavillion ZE5375US laptop which is quite good
>>with
>>: one exception: The previous owner customized the HDD in a way that I
>>don't
>>: like.
>>
>>: Chiefly, the HDD seems to be partitioned so that Windows XP home is
>>loaded
>>: into both the C and the D drives. I'm sure this has something to do with
>>: "partitioning," which I've never understood.
>>
>>Partitioning is merely splitting a physical hard drive into smaller
>>parts. Suppose you wanted a 25GB drive and a separate 15GB drive.
>>You could just use one 40GB drive and split it into two. There are
>>good reasons for doing this. For one, you might want to install two
>>operating systems on the same physical hard drive. Maybe you want
>>Windows 98 and Windows XP on separate installs but you want to share
>>data between them - then you would make three partitions, one for 98,
>>one for XP, and one for data and programs.
>>
>>For most people a single partition makes sense, though. You should
>>try to combine the partitions together. I don't know why he had XP on
>>both partitions, but there are reasons. Maybe it wasn't originally
>>that way?
>>
>>: Also some of the main components of the original configuration are
>>missing.
>>
>>: I reinstalled Windows XP from scratch, but it didn't correct the
>>problem.
>>: Still have two active drives.
>>
>>One recovery disk should have Windows on it. Are you saying you have a
>>separate disk from Microsoft with the Windows install on it (and you
>>had to type in a key to activate Windows XP)? If recovery disks have
>>Windows XP on them you might want to use those instead of the regular
>>Windows disk.
>>
>>Windows lets you blow away old partitions and re-format your drive
>>before your install. Did you not do that because you have files and
>>programs on the original partition that you don't want to lose?
>>
>>Programs like Partition Magic will allow you to shrink and combine
>>partitions. You'd start by erasing files in the 2nd partition (if
>>that's OK) and blowing away the 2nd partition, then using a Partition
>>Magic-like program to enlarge the first partition to use the free
>>space.
>>
>>: In addition to the Operating System disc, I have four recovery discs
>>that
>>: came with the laptop. These have never been opened.
>>
>>: I'm sure there must be some way to restore the laptop to the way it was
>>when
>>: it came out of the factory. Any guidance on how to do this will be
>>: appreciated. Please keep it simple. Thanks.
>>
>>It should be very easy if you are willing to wipe the hard drive
>>completely and lose everything. Just use the recovery CDs to
>>re-install Windows and delete all partitions as part of the install.
>>If you don't want to lose everything, use Partition Magic as described
>>above.
>>
>>Andrew
>>--
>>----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
>>*******************************************************************
>>----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
>>----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
>>*******************************************************************
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 23, 2005 11:34:19 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Hi Andrew,

I would like to respectfully disagree with you. I think every user
should have at least 2 partitions. One for programs and the other
for data.

I come across people who don't have backups and they don't because
'it takes forever' to backup my hard disk. When you have all of your
data stored on one drive, it is a lot easier to do a backup.

The bonus of is that the user would learn better filing techniques.
About half of the software on my machine does not automatically save
data to my documents or a sub directory, As a result they have data
all over their [C:] drive.

I have 6 major projects that I am working on, and they all have
their own directory. Under each of those folders are sub-folders
dedicated to different things within each project. I can find any
data file on my computer in less than 30 seconds. I know way to many
people who lose data to the black hole they call their [C:] drive.

My primary laptop has a 100GB hard disk. 30GB is for program and the
other 64GB is for data.

Then there is the matter of needing to reload your system after
major crash. If your data is on a separate drive, it may very well
survive. If it is all on your [C:] drive then you had better have
good backups or you are out-of-luck.

I think the OP may want to reconsider getting rid of his second drive.

Ciao . . . C.Joseph

That which a man buys too cheaply . . .
He esteems too lightly

Andrew wrote:
> For most people a single partition makes sense, though. You should
> try to combine the partitions together. I don't know why he had XP on
> both partitions, but there are reasons. Maybe it wasn't originally
> that way?
>
> Andrew
> --
> ----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
> *******************************************************************
> ----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
> ----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
> *******************************************************************
>
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June 23, 2005 7:36:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

C.Joseph Drayton <kalek1@mindspring.com> wrote:
: I would like to respectfully disagree with you. I think every user
: should have at least 2 partitions. One for programs and the other
: for data.

: I come across people who don't have backups and they don't because
: 'it takes forever' to backup my hard disk. When you have all of your
: data stored on one drive, it is a lot easier to do a backup.

If they had a proper backup system, only the first backup would take
significant time. Future backups would save only the changes between
backups and would be quicker.

From my experience, people aren't going to back up their data any more
regularly if it takes less time. Unless convinced of the horrors of
disk failure, computer users tend to be lazy and complacent. They
think their computer hard drives are indestructible - ha! Just wait
until they turn on the computer one day and find their hard drive
going "click - click - click" and their data is lost forever (without
paying a recovery service $5,000 to get it back).

(One friend of mine called to ask if that "click - click - click"
sound her computer was making was bad! Yes, I said, BACKUP YOUR DATA
IMMEDIATELY while the drive was still working. At least print out
that important financial data. My friend ignored me and two days
later the drive died and she lost everything.)

You are right in theory - having multiple partitions does have some
benefits. I used to use multiple partitions, too, but I found them to
be a pain and have since moved to having everything on one C: in
Windows. It usually turns out to be simpler to have everything on one
logical drive. As you say, some programs do still put their data in
C: (some even in the program directory!), so if you want to guarantee
all data is in the same location, you have to put your programs on
both c: and d:. Then later you have programs in two spots. You're
looking for a program - is it on C: or D:?

The biggest problem with partitions is that, inevitably, one of them
fills up while the other one has plenty of room. You've either got to
use Partition Magic to free up some space from one to the other (not
something I would recommend to a novice user) or shovel files from one
partition to the other or have to spend the time deleting files on the
full partition while, perversely, that other one has plenty of space
on it! I know others have been down that road - it's just a pig pain
in the ass.

I'd also argue that it's easier to make backups when everything is on
C: . Then you have only one drive to backup, not two. It's 2X the
work to backup two drives. Even if you put all your data on only the
D:, you should backup C: also - Windows always seems to put stuff
there you want to save regardless of what you try to tell it to do.

The real solution to backup problems is to convince people they need
to spend an extra $100 on an external hard drive after spending $1200
on the laptop and that a backup is essential if they care about their
data at all. External harddrives are much easier than a CD or DVD to
deal with. Just plug the drive in, do the backup before you go to
bed, and that's it.

Soon they will have wireless backup drives that can be programmed to
backup your drive every day without you even asking. At that point,
you won't really have to worry about partition issues and backups.

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
*******************************************************************
----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
*******************************************************************
!