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Would an old case work with a new build?

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  • Homebuilt
  • Cases
  • New Build
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
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July 2, 2011 1:25:13 PM

My current home computer is an old Intel D850MV MB P4 2GHz in an even older Micron Millennia case. It's a pretty big box with lots of space, and I like the front panel configuration with one optical drive exposed and all other bays behind a door.

When I toyed with the idea of building an i7 870 a while back, I didn't really like the case choices. Seemed like they were all gamer-oriented, way out designs, totally boring or not the "right" features/looks, or waaay expensive. If I run into the same dilemma if I build something later this year, is there a chance to use this old case, or modern components just too different to fit, screw holes in the wrong spot, etc? Also, though I'm not thinking of building an OCd monster gaming computer that needs lots of cooling, I don't know if the venting holes are suffiucient by today's standards. I suppose I could just order all parts except the case anbd see, but once I had all the components I would hate to play trial and error and wait to get a case.
Thanks!

More about : case work build

a b B Homebuilt system
July 2, 2011 2:54:26 PM

I believe it will allow for upgrade. Just check if the case is ATX/Micro ATX compatible. If it is ATX/Micro ATX compatible then YES!
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 2, 2011 4:13:03 PM

just remember if your going for an intel build go sandy bridge (the 2XXX series eg i3-2100 not the first gen, XXX series eg the i7-920) if your going towards an AMD build then remember to go for an AM3+ board if you want to leave the option of a future upgrade open.
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July 2, 2011 5:03:48 PM

ps3hacker12 said:
just remember if your going for an intel build go sandy bridge (the 2XXX series eg i3-2100 not the first gen, XXX series eg the i7-920) if your going towards an AMD build then remember to go for an AM3+ board if you want to leave the option of a future upgrade open.

Most likely will go Intel...either an i5 2500k or i7 2600K, depending on pricing at the time.
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 2, 2011 5:13:33 PM

noonin said:
Most likely will go Intel...either an i5 2500k or i7 2600K, depending on pricing at the time.


yep, if your budget is large enough, then a 2500K or 2600K are two great options! if you want to allow for overclocking then you should go for a P67 or Z68 mobo, otherwise if you don't want to overclock (or don't need the features of Z68), then H61 and H67 are also good options.
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July 2, 2011 5:49:55 PM

r0aringdrag0n said:
I believe it will allow for upgrade. Just check if the case is ATX/Micro ATX compatible. If it is ATX/Micro ATX compatible then YES!

I don't know enough if it conforms to the ATX standards, but assuming it does.
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July 2, 2011 5:58:59 PM

ps3hacker12 said:
yep, if your budget is large enough, then a 2500K or 2600K are two great options! if you want to allow for overclocking then you should go for a P67 or Z68 mobo, otherwise if you don't want to overclock (or don't need the features of Z68), then H61 and H67 are also good options.

I'll look at MoBos closer to built time...things will likely be a little different by Q4.
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 2, 2011 6:23:10 PM

Aside from the motherboard form factor, the only other thing you really need to worry about is the front power/reset/activity light connections. If all of these wires are hooked together into a single plug, it probably won't match a newer motherboard and have to be reconfigured/separated.

-Wolf sends
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July 2, 2011 7:05:24 PM

Wolfshadw said:
Aside from the motherboard form factor, the only other thing you really need to worry about is the front power/reset/activity light connections. If all of these wires are hooked together into a single plug, it probably won't match a newer motherboard and have to be reconfigured/separated.

-Wolf sends

Good point ;-), though probably a way to make it work.
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