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What Can I Do With This Old LCD Screen

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 25, 2005 8:43:06 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hey All
i Got a Very Old Laptop (apple 180c)
and i will like to use the laptop LCD screen .
how can i do that ?
the screen id is : Sharp LQ9D01A

can any one help ?

thx
Naquada

More about : lcd screen

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 25, 2005 9:05:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

LMAS

now for real can i use it ?
June 25, 2005 4:02:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Naquada" <Naquada@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1119699786.458843.277360@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Hey All
> i Got a Very Old Laptop (apple 180c)
> and i will like to use the laptop LCD screen .
> how can i do that ?
> the screen id is : Sharp LQ9D01A
>
> can any one help ?
>
> thx
> Naquada
>

remove screen from base,
place flat on table,
place cups, mugs, beer glasses etc on screen.
no more rings on table..........
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 25, 2005 4:47:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

did any one try to make it work and can send me some info and some pics
?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 25, 2005 4:48:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

did any one make it work and can send me some info or an HOWTO ?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 25, 2005 6:55:53 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Naquada wrote:

> now for real can i use it ?

Sure. Just get the specifications from Sharp, find a suitable controller and
solder Your own gfx card for it... ;-)

These displays have no standard interface, using them on something other
than the notebook they were intended for requires very good electronic
knowledge and the ability to do electronic engineering...

Better put that thing on ebay, perhaps someone might need it as a
replacement for his old Powerbook 180c...

Benjamin
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 25, 2005 10:06:10 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Naquada wrote:
> did any one make it work and can send me some info or an HOWTO ?

What part of "you cannot do this unless you have access to a corporate
research and development department with unlimited funding" did you not
understand?

Q
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 25, 2005 10:15:23 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Sat, 25 Jun 2005 18:06:10 -0600, "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net>
wrote:

>Naquada wrote:
>> did any one make it work and can send me some info or an HOWTO ?
>
>What part of "you cannot do this unless you have access to a corporate
>research and development department with unlimited funding" did you not
>understand?

?Why couldn't he experiment with something like this ?

http://www.g4tv.com/attackoftheshow/features/51636/8_Bi...

I know, I know, g4tv. Restrain yourself.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 26, 2005 7:02:17 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

As a practical matter, the only use of that screen (or any other) is to
repair another laptop that uses that screen or one compatible with it.


Naquada wrote:

> Hey All
> i Got a Very Old Laptop (apple 180c)
> and i will like to use the laptop LCD screen .
> how can i do that ?
> the screen id is : Sharp LQ9D01A
>
> can any one help ?
>
> thx
> Naquada
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 26, 2005 3:14:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Dmitri Timiankin wrote:

> On Sat, 25 Jun 2005 18:06:10 -0600, "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net>
> wrote:
>
>>Naquada wrote:
>>> did any one make it work and can send me some info or an HOWTO ?
>>
>>What part of "you cannot do this unless you have access to a corporate
>>research and development department with unlimited funding" did you not
>>understand?
>
> ?Why couldn't he experiment with something like this ?
>
>
http://www.g4tv.com/attackoftheshow/features/51636/8_Bi...
>
> I know, I know, g4tv. Restrain yourself.

He's welcome to _experiment_ all he wants to. But to do what he wants to do
he needs _much_ more experience as an electronics hobbyist than he
apparently has.

There is, no doubt, a commercially available chip that provides the
necessary interface--there's probably even one on the motherboard to his
dead laptop, assuming he hasn't tossed the rest of the corpse, and assuming
that that's not the part of the laptop that died. The necessary
connector(s) and cable(s) to hook that chip to the display should be there
as well. If he can pull that chip and figure out how to use it in or in
conjunction with a desktop machine then he might be able to do what he's
trying to do without vast expense, but he'd still be designing a circuit
board to go with that chip, and the details of the board are going to
depend on the design of the chip, for which he's either going to need the
manufacturer's datasheet, which may be hard to get, especially if the
laptop manufacturer has obscured the markings, which some of them sometimes
do for some reason, or he's going to have to reverse engineer from the
circuit board design in the laptop. He may also find himself needing to
make a multilayer board, on which the best price I can find is about 160
bucks (80 each but minimum buy is two), for manufacture alone assuming he's
got the design in a form compatible with their system.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 27, 2005 6:09:55 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Re: "There is, no doubt, a commercially available chip that provides the
necessary interface--there's probably even one on the motherboard to his
dead laptop, assuming he hasn't tossed the rest of the corpse, and
assuming that that's not the part of the laptop that died. The
necessary connector(s) and cable(s) to hook that chip to the display
should be there as well."

Actually, no.

The chip in the laptop is a video chip, such as an ATI or NVidia chip,
with a TMDS output instead of an analog VGA output. But that isn't what
he wants to do, he'd not trying to build either a computer or a video
card. He's trying to take some signal (VGA analog, DVI, or even S-Video
or composite TV) and display it. There actually are not, as far as I
know, commercially available chips to do that. The functions are done,
but they are done with custom programmed microprocessors, not "off the
shelf" chips (as far as I am aware of), in part because there are so
many damn interfaces to so many different LCD panels (thousands ....
they are almost all different). So do the chips exist? Maybe, maybe
not, but even if they do, not as commercially available off-the-shelf
parts, but rather as proprietary, custom ASICs (custom programmed
microprocessors).

Then there is still the problem that even having a surface mount VLSI
chip still, for most people, doesn't really get them any closer to an
actual working product than would having a bucket of sand which, after
all, is mostly silicon.

This isn't trivial. What he wants is physically possible, but it's
going to take the equivalent of an at least 6-figure developement effort
to do it, unless someone else has already done it (for his exact panel),
and he can find and buy that product, quantity one, for a price that is
economically feasible in terms of what he's trying to build. But note
that the existence of laptops using a given computer display does not
imply the existence of display monitor chips for that same display.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 27, 2005 6:09:56 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:

> Re: "There is, no doubt, a commercially available chip that provides the
> necessary interface--there's probably even one on the motherboard to his
> dead laptop, assuming he hasn't tossed the rest of the corpse, and
> assuming that that's not the part of the laptop that died. The
> necessary connector(s) and cable(s) to hook that chip to the display
> should be there as well."
>
> Actually, no.
>
> The chip in the laptop is a video chip, such as an ATI or NVidia chip,
> with a TMDS output instead of an analog VGA output.

Is it? Or does it use a bridge chip?

> But that isn't what
> he wants to do, he'd not trying to build either a computer or a video
> card. He's trying to take some signal (VGA analog, DVI, or even S-Video
> or composite TV) and display it. There actually are not, as far as I
> know, commercially available chips to do that. The functions are done,
> but they are done with custom programmed microprocessors, not "off the
> shelf" chips (as far as I am aware of), in part because there are so
> many damn interfaces to so many different LCD panels (thousands ....
> they are almost all different).

Whoa. Stop. ATI and nvidia are not going to make thousands of different
chip designs to support thousands of different panels. If there's an
nvidia or ATI chip directly driving the panel then the panel has an input
that is standardized in some way. If it's not standardized then there's
some glue logic in there that should be adaptable to other purposes.

> So do the chips exist?> Maybe, maybe
> not, but even if they do, not as commercially available off-the-shelf
> parts, but rather as proprietary, custom ASICs (custom programmed
> microprocessors).

As for the chips existing, do you seriously believe that laptops have a
bunch of discrete logic driving the display? If so, I want some of what
you're smoking. On second thought, no, I don't.

> Then there is still the problem that even having a surface mount VLSI
> chip still, for most people, doesn't really get them any closer to an
> actual working product than would having a bucket of sand which, after
> all, is mostly silicon.

The average man in the street can't build a light airplane with performance
close to that of a WWII fighter either, but a number of people have done
it.

> This isn't trivial.

So?

> What he wants is physically possible, but it's
> going to take the equivalent of an at least 6-figure developement effort
> to do it, unless someone else has already done it (for his exact panel),
> and he can find and buy that product, quantity one, for a price that is
> economically feasible in terms of what he's trying to build. But note
> that the existence of laptops using a given computer display does not
> imply the existence of display monitor chips for that same display.

If someone is paying an engineering team to do it, certainly. But you might
be surprised at some of the things that electronics hobbyists have pulled
off on a shoe string. I suspect that if the ARRL had asked you about
comsats you'd have told them to forget about it.

I agree that the person asking the question is very unlikely to be able to
pull this off, but that doesn't mean that he shouldn't try if he wants to.
And maybe he'll learn something.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 27, 2005 5:55:45 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:

> Re: "There is, no doubt, a commercially available chip that provides
> the necessary interface--there's probably even one on the motherboard
> to his dead laptop, assuming he hasn't tossed the rest of the corpse,
> and assuming that that's not the part of the laptop that died. The
> necessary connector(s) and cable(s) to hook that chip to the display
> should be there as well."
>
> Actually, no.
>
> The chip in the laptop is a video chip, such as an ATI or NVidia chip,
> with a TMDS output instead of an analog VGA output.

Nope. Maybe You just don't know it, but TMDS exists only for a couple of
years now. And the Powerbook 180C where the display comes from for sure
doesn't have anything from ATI or Nvidia (which btw even didn't exist at
that time!) inside, or anything that delivers a TMDS signal...

Besides that, You can't drive a TFT display directly with the TMDS signal
alone. TMDS is just for signal transmission between gfx card and monitor
(monitor as a unit, not just the panel!). Even in modern notebooks there
still is a display controller that takes the TMDS signal and converts it in
output the panel can work with. You can't drive the panel directly with the
TMDS signal, it _always_ has to be converted first...

> But that isn't
> what he wants to do, he'd not trying to build either a computer or a
> video card. He's trying to take some signal (VGA analog, DVI, or
> even S-Video or composite TV) and display it. There actually are
> not, as far as I know, commercially available chips to do that.

Well, of course there are, used in every flat panel display with analog
input and in every flat panel television...

Benjamin
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 29, 2005 3:31:38 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

The differences between different LCD panels don't (for the most part)
require different chips, but they do require different circuit cards.
The differences are, relatively, minor ... cabling, pinout, polarity and
a few other things that are addressed in the PCB layout and cables, and
in the driver chips between the video chips and the panel; and also, the
firmware programming. But they are still enough to keep one product (at
the cable and circuit board level) from working with a panel other than
the one(s) for which it was designed.

J. Clarke wrote:

> Barry Watzman wrote:
>
>
>>Re: "There is, no doubt, a commercially available chip that provides the
>>necessary interface--there's probably even one on the motherboard to his
>>dead laptop, assuming he hasn't tossed the rest of the corpse, and
>>assuming that that's not the part of the laptop that died. The
>>necessary connector(s) and cable(s) to hook that chip to the display
>>should be there as well."
>>
>>Actually, no.
>>
>>The chip in the laptop is a video chip, such as an ATI or NVidia chip,
>>with a TMDS output instead of an analog VGA output.
>
>
> Is it? Or does it use a bridge chip?
>
>
>>But that isn't what
>>he wants to do, he'd not trying to build either a computer or a video
>>card. He's trying to take some signal (VGA analog, DVI, or even S-Video
>>or composite TV) and display it. There actually are not, as far as I
>>know, commercially available chips to do that. The functions are done,
>>but they are done with custom programmed microprocessors, not "off the
>>shelf" chips (as far as I am aware of), in part because there are so
>>many damn interfaces to so many different LCD panels (thousands ....
>>they are almost all different).
>
>
> Whoa. Stop. ATI and nvidia are not going to make thousands of different
> chip designs to support thousands of different panels. If there's an
> nvidia or ATI chip directly driving the panel then the panel has an input
> that is standardized in some way. If it's not standardized then there's
> some glue logic in there that should be adaptable to other purposes.
>
>
>>So do the chips exist?> Maybe, maybe
>>not, but even if they do, not as commercially available off-the-shelf
>>parts, but rather as proprietary, custom ASICs (custom programmed
>>microprocessors).
>
>
> As for the chips existing, do you seriously believe that laptops have a
> bunch of discrete logic driving the display? If so, I want some of what
> you're smoking. On second thought, no, I don't.
>
>
>>Then there is still the problem that even having a surface mount VLSI
>>chip still, for most people, doesn't really get them any closer to an
>>actual working product than would having a bucket of sand which, after
>>all, is mostly silicon.
>
>
> The average man in the street can't build a light airplane with performance
> close to that of a WWII fighter either, but a number of people have done
> it.
>
>
>>This isn't trivial.
>
>
> So?
>
>
>>What he wants is physically possible, but it's
>>going to take the equivalent of an at least 6-figure developement effort
>>to do it, unless someone else has already done it (for his exact panel),
>>and he can find and buy that product, quantity one, for a price that is
>>economically feasible in terms of what he's trying to build. But note
>>that the existence of laptops using a given computer display does not
>>imply the existence of display monitor chips for that same display.
>
>
> If someone is paying an engineering team to do it, certainly. But you might
> be surprised at some of the things that electronics hobbyists have pulled
> off on a shoe string. I suspect that if the ARRL had asked you about
> comsats you'd have told them to forget about it.
>
> I agree that the person asking the question is very unlikely to be able to
> pull this off, but that doesn't mean that he shouldn't try if he wants to.
> And maybe he'll learn something.
>
!