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Does My mobo support DDR3 GPU?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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April 20, 2011 4:56:28 PM

may be this question is similar like "i have ddr2 ram,Does my mobo support ddr3 gpu?" But it is not so.I know very well that ddr2 ram and ddr3 gpu do'nt vary on each other.Firstly I say that I am very idiot on hardwares.But I always prefer internet forums for know something about hardwares.OK,My Issue: My mobo is asus p5kpl-am in, i have seen in a website(i have forgot the name)that my mobo don't support ddr3 gpu and it is the disadvantage of mobo with intel g31 express chipsets,But I think I had done a mistake to understand.Cause I have already use so many forums and I have got answer that my mobo can handle ddr3 gpu.But I want to be confirmed from this distinguished forum-TOMSHARDWARE FORUM..I AM NEW-COMER,I WILL BE SO THANKFUL TO YOU....(If I have done any mistake in english writing I am sorry for that).Thanks

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a b U Graphics card
April 20, 2011 5:23:11 PM

The type of VRAM on a video card is not important to the system being able to use it -- the video card is the only piece that interacts with it's RAM (the computer communicates with the video card through the PCI-e slot and once the information is exchanged the video card it takes care of the processing of the info and storing it in VRAM the type of VRAM makes no difference to the rest of your computer as only the video card interacts with that memory. (kind of like when you order a product from the internet it makes no difference to you where the company you order from is located or what type of supply chain they use - all that matters is that the product you order is delivered to you when you expect it -- you do not need to know what they had to do to get the product to you or how it was stored on it's way since you never communicate with any of the others along the way - much the same as your computer does not care where\how the video card store's its information it just cares that the requested info is processed and sent to it across the PCI-e slot
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April 20, 2011 5:36:54 PM

JDFan said:
The type of VRAM on a video card is not important to the system being able to use it -- the video card is the only piece that interacts with it's RAM (the computer communicates with the video card through the PCI-e slot and once the information is exchanged the video card it takes care of the processing of the info and storing it in VRAM the type of VRAM makes no difference to the rest of your computer as only the video card interacts with that memory. (kind of like when you order a product from the internet it makes no difference to you where the company you order from is located or what type of supply chain they use - all that matters is that the product you order is delivered to you when you expect it -- you do not need to know what they had to do to get the product to you or how it was stored on it's way since you never communicate with any of the others along the way - much the same as your computer does not care where\how the video card store's its information it just cares that the requested info is processed and sent to it across the PCI-e slot

so I can use 9800 gt ddr3 without any hesitation,thank you so much..and I have one more idiot type question which may not be subject of this forum...I have a 450 watt smps,Does it mean my psu also 450 watt?Believe me I really don't know it.
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a b U Graphics card
April 20, 2011 5:58:43 PM

abar92 said:
so I can use 9800 gt ddr3 without any hesitation,thank you so much..and I have one more idiot type question which may not be subject of this forum...I have a 450 watt smps,Does it mean my psu also 450 watt?Believe me I really don't know it.


As long as the slot type ( PCI, PCI-e, AGP) is the correct type for the system (the MOBO has the correct type of connection to place the 9800gt into) - The computer case has enough space for the video card to be placed inside of it - the monitor you are using has the correct type of connection to be hooked up to the video card ( or you have an adapter to get the right connection) - and your computer has a Powersupply that provides enough power to run the card (and has the correct connectors if external power connectors are needed) then you should be fine.

On the PSU more important than the overall Wattage of the PSU you need to make sure the +12v lines have enough Amps to provide power to the video card (some older 450W PSUs provide 450 total Watts but that power is mostly +5v or +3V (since older systems used more of that voltage of power) instead of +12v amperage -- so look on the PSU for the label and see what it lists as Amps on the +12v lines (if it has more than 1 rail ie. +12v1 and +12v2 listed on the label look for a listing that shows the total +12v amperage (because normally you can not use both at full capacity at the same time - ie. on this Rosewill PSU label below +12v1 @ 14A and +12v2 @ 16A does not mean you have 30A of +12v since it also lists the MAX as 435W total with 130W of that on the +3vand +5v lines -- meaning you actually have 305W Max available on the +12V rail and since Amps = Wattage divided by Voltage ( 305/12 = 25.4Amps) - SO this PSU has a MAX of 25A on the +12V rails (not the 30A that you'd think at first glance at the label) !!

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April 30, 2011 6:17:50 AM

Best answer selected by abar92.
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a c 272 U Graphics card
April 30, 2011 7:05:06 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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