Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Is this RAM compatible with i3-2120 CPU?

Last response: in Memory
Share
June 21, 2012 8:43:04 PM

I'm building a computer this summer and I really need some help on one last thing. I need to know if my memory is compatible with my CPU. I have bought the Intel Core i3-2120 and 8GB DDR3 1333 Mhz Kingston HyperX RAM.

I heard people were able to make both of these pieces work together without any problems.
However, some people claim the opposite : They say that because the HyperX Kingston RAM can be run at 1.65 volt and the i3 series CPU can only support up to 1.5 volt, the two are incompatible with each other and the RAM could damage the CPU.

Here's the description of the RAM by Kingston :
Spoiler
Kingston's KHX 1600C9D3K2/8GX is a kit of two 512M x 64-bit (4GB) DDR3-1600 CL9 SDRAM (Synchronous DRAM) 2Rx8 memory modules, based on sixteen 256M x 8-bit DDR3 FBGA components per module. Each module kit supports Intel® XMP (Extreme Memory Profiles). Total kit capacity is 8GB. Each module kit has been tested to run at DDR3-1600 at a low latency timing of 9-9-9-27 at 1.65V . The SPDs are programmed to JEDEC standard latency DDR3-1333 timing of 9-9-9 at 1.5V . Each 240-pin DIMM uses gold contact fingers and requires + 1.5V .
.
So my guess is maybe I can program the RAM so it can run at only 1.5 volt. And doing so, it would be compatible with my i3 CPU.

So what do you guys think? Have you ever tried using HyperX Kingston RAM with an i3-2120 CPU? Do you think 1.65 volt RAM can be program to run at 1.5 volt?

Thank you for your time!
a b à CPUs
June 21, 2012 8:49:53 PM

its not good for the memory controller to run it that high. It can fry it over time. You can try to set to a lower speed and lower the voltage. Some kits will run perfectly at 1.55 even though theyre rated for more. Better yet just buy a new kit
Score
0
June 21, 2012 9:00:01 PM

bavman said:
its not good for the memory controller to run it that high. It can fry it over time. You can try to set to a lower speed and lower the voltage. Some kits will run perfectly at 1.55 even though theyre rated for more. Better yet just buy a new kit


So, even if i set the RAM to run at 1.5, it's risky? Arent the RAM made to programmable at the voltage needed?
Score
0
Related resources

Best solution

a b à CPUs
June 21, 2012 9:08:48 PM

No, if you set it to 1.5v manually then you absolutely fine, but chances are that it won't be stable that low. you could try 1.55v that should be fine for your memory controller, but no guarantees that it'll be stable either
Share
June 22, 2012 6:34:17 PM

bavman said:
No, if you set it to 1.5v manually then you absolutely fine, but chances are that it won't be stable that low. you could try 1.55v that should be fine for your memory controller, but no guarantees that it'll be stable either


I'll play it safe. I just talked with the manager from the shop where I bought it and he told me I can exchange the 1.65 volt one with a 1.5 one. The only difference is that there won't be any heatspreader on the memory sticks. but it doesn't botter me since I won't do overclocking and I'll have a fan to cool it down.

Thanks for the help, but I have one last question :
Is there a big difference in performance between 8gb of 1600mhz DDR3 and 1333mhz?
Score
0
a b à CPUs
June 22, 2012 6:41:03 PM

Probably such a slight performance increase that you wouldn't notice it in real world circumstances, might show up as a small improvement in some benchmarks. It also might depend on what cpu you have. For example bulldozer tends to benefit from higher speed ram that do intel cpus. Just look up some articles on memory on toms here and see if it'll make a difference in your case
Score
0
a b } Memory
a b à CPUs
June 22, 2012 8:13:13 PM

Depends on what motherboard you have, some are limited to 1333.
Score
0
a b } Memory
a c 116 à CPUs
June 22, 2012 8:51:46 PM

ClownWalker said:
Is there a big difference in performance between 8gb of 1600mhz DDR3 and 1333mhz?

Even between 1066 and 2133 you would be looking at ~2% difference in real-world applications so this is not really worth worrying about unless they are priced almost the same.
Score
0
June 29, 2012 7:37:22 PM

Best answer selected by ClownWalker.
Score
0
a c 146 } Memory
a b à CPUs
June 29, 2012 9:53:24 PM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
Score
0
!