Be Quiet EP 600w vs FSP Everest 800w

Which PSU should I buy? I know little about these brands. The components in general are a Q6600 and HD5850, with a future 5850 upgrade possible.

This PSU is 800W and has plenty of connectors:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/110752684538?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

This PSU is 80 Plus gold and apparently quiet:
http://www.ebuyer.com/278518-be-quiet-ep-600w-80plus-gold-psu-bn188

Please say if you know of a better PSU for the same price of £65. I would also appreciate ebuyer/ebay coupons, discounts, or any way to lower the prices. If possible I would also like a location for cheap DDR2 800 to 1066(preferably) MHz RAM, as the 2x2GB models are quite expensive.
6 answers Last reply
More about quiet 600w everest 800w
  1. Get a Corsair or Antec. I believe these are no name brand crappy PSU's that only give like %50 of the labeled wattage.
  2. Agreed, stay away from no name PSU's
  3. They aren't no name brands. You probably don't know of Be Quiet because it does not distribute its products in the US (a while ago I heard something about this apparently changing).
    And FSP are OEM for a lot of other brands, including Antec for some of their lower end models. However I have my doubts about the Everest line of FSP PSUs.

    Out of the two I would buy the Be Quiet.
  4. Silvune said:
    They aren't no name brands. You probably don't know of Be Quiet because it does not distribute its products in the US (a while ago I heard something about this apparently changing).
    And FSP are OEM for a lot of other brands, including Antec for some of their lower end models. However I have my doubts about the Everest line of FSP PSUs.

    Out of the two I would buy the Be Quiet.

    Silvune,
    you seem to know a lot about PSUs. The ones you advised me, I found an unused XFX Pro 850W Core Edition which falls within my budget. The Thermaltake you recommended is out of stock. Do you think this is the best option for now and future upgrades? Also, would a ~400W crossfire fall neatly into the optimum load efficiency?
    Secondly, does this mean a PSU cannot be trusted just because it is 80+ certified?
  5. I think the XFX Pro 850W Core Edition would be a good option, especially if it is from a trusted seller and if you have ambitions to upgrade to two high end cards in the future.
    According to these reviews:
    http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/XFX-PRO-850-W-Power-Supply-Review/1205/7
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story4&reid=217
    The efficiency is highest between 20 and 50/60% load, which is about 400W.

    The Thermaltake I recommended should be available at other etailers, such as Scan.
    £65
    http://www.scan.co.uk/products/675w-psu-thermaltake-tpx-675mpcuk-modular-89eff-80-plus-bronze-sli-crossfire-eps-12v-quiet-fan-atx
    Antec Truepower New TPN-650 80Plus Bronze Modular £65
    http://www.scan.co.uk/products/650w-psu-antec-truepower-new-modular-82eff-80-plus-bronze-sli-crossfire-eps-12v-quiet-fan-atx

    Yes you are correct that just because a unit is 80Plus certified does not mean that it is high quality. And that is not to talk about how some brands don't legitimately use the 80Plus symbols.
    Efficiency is just one aspect of the performance of a PSU. There are other aspects such as voltage regulation - where the voltage on each rail (3.3V, 5V, 12V etc) has to remain within 5% of the nominal value. Ripple and noise suppression, where ripple on each line must be controlled (50mv and under on the 3.3V and 5V rail, 120mV and under on the 12V). Then there is build quality. It's fine having good performance as long as the PSU lasts at least as long as your actual system does. But there won't be any performance at all if the PSU is not design to run in the conditions in which it is kept (temperature rating) or if it fails after a few months etc. Just because a PSU has some level of 80Plus certification does not mean than any of these other aspects of performance are up to scratch.
    Those are more or less the essential ones. Then there are more optional ones such as the size of the fan and the speed at which it runs. The number and length of the connectors. The size of the case - some large PSUs are incompatible with smaller mATX cases.
  6. Silvune said:
    I think the XFX Pro 850W Core Edition would be a good option, especially if it is from a trusted seller and if you have ambitions to upgrade to two high end cards in the future.
    According to these reviews:
    http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/XFX-PRO-850-W-Power-Supply-Review/1205/7
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story4&reid=217
    The efficiency is highest between 20 and 50/60% load, which is about 400W.

    The Thermaltake I recommended should be available at other etailers, such as Scan.
    £65
    http://www.scan.co.uk/products/675w-psu-thermaltake-tpx-675mpcuk-modular-89eff-80-plus-bronze-sli-crossfire-eps-12v-quiet-fan-atx
    Antec Truepower New TPN-650 80Plus Bronze Modular £65
    http://www.scan.co.uk/products/650w-psu-antec-truepower-new-modular-82eff-80-plus-bronze-sli-crossfire-eps-12v-quiet-fan-atx

    Yes you are correct that just because a unit is 80Plus certified does not mean that it is high quality. And that is not to talk about how some brands don't legitimately use the 80Plus symbols.
    Efficiency is just one aspect of the performance of a PSU. There are other aspects such as voltage regulation - where the voltage on each rail (3.3V, 5V, 12V etc) has to remain within 5% of the nominal value. Ripple and noise suppression, where ripple on each line must be controlled (50mv and under on the 3.3V and 5V rail, 120mV and under on the 12V). Then there is build quality. It's fine having good performance as long as the PSU lasts at least as long as your actual system does. But there won't be any performance at all if the PSU is not design to run in the conditions in which it is kept (temperature rating) or if it fails after a few months etc. Just because a PSU has some level of 80Plus certification does not mean than any of these other aspects of performance are up to scratch.
    Those are more or less the essential ones. Then there are more optional ones such as the size of the fan and the speed at which it runs. The number and length of the connectors. The size of the case - some large PSUs are incompatible with smaller mATX cases.

    OK, I won't get the Everest then. While we're on this topic, what type of RAM do you think I should buy? It's the last thing I need to get. My motherboard is an Asus P5Q SE2 which accepts DDR2 800-1200MHz. I would prefer 4GB since I just bought a 64 bit Win 7 upgrade, but I don't want to rack up the price above £30 (£40 max) because it's DDR2 memory and not something I can carry into my next build. What do the numbers x-x-y-z mean and do I need to buy RAM of the same kind to get dual channel?
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