Closed Solved

What is the recommended motherboard for the Intel 3770k processor?

All I want is the cheapest motherboard that supports ALL the following.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology
Intel® Turbo Boost Technology 2.0
Intel® 64
Idle States
Enhanced Intel SpeedStep® Technology
Thermal Monitoring Technologies
Execute Disable Bit

Intel® Quick Sync Video
Intel® InTru™ 3D Technology
Intel® Flexible Display Interface (Intel® FDI)
Intel® Clear Video HD Technology

(I'm not sure if some of these features will be there regardless of the motherboard purchased so feel free to correct me) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


I figured that if I bought this processor I might as well buy a motherboard that lets me use all the features that this processor has on it.

I would like to have a recommendation on the cheapest Intel motherboard and a few on other band motherboards.

Thank you for helping me out!!!
:pt1cable: :pt1cable: :pt1cable:
26 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about what recommended motherboard intel 3770k processor
  1. I could be mistaken but I think the Z77 chipset is the best (as in supports the most features) among the Ivy Bridge oriented motherboards so something like this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128547 should have everything you need
  2. akxpckwb said:
    I could be mistaken but I think the Z77 chipset is the best (as in supports the most features) among the Ivy Bridge oriented motherboards so something like this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128547 should have everything you need


    I would like a motherboard that would also be able to support crossfire 7970's both running on PCI express 3.0 (Gives them 10% performance boost)
  3. amuffin said:


    Thank you for your help (Telling me to look for Z77 chip sets) but I have decided to go with a BIOSTAR TZ77XE3
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=13-138-355&SortField=0&SummaryType=0&Pagesize=10&PurchaseMark=&SelectedRating=-1&VideoOnlyMark=False&VendorMark=&IsFeedbackTab=true&Page=3#scrollFullInfo

    It had most the features I wanted at a reasonable price.
  4. Yes Biostar is usually cheaper than other brands. Anyway glad we could help
  5. What about this one? You know, u are getting pretty good CPU, but only less than average mobo. Why is that? Mobo is more important than u think.

    This one will let u OC much easier and it will stay stable even in higher overclock, while that Biostar will not be able to take the heat.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157298

  6. About asrock and gigabyte go with gigabyte, i dont like asrock being the cheap asus, with you wanna buy an asrock spend a little more and go with asus
  7. andover said:
    About asrock and gigabyte go with gigabyte, i dont like asrock being the cheap asus, with you wanna buy an asrock spend a little more and go with asus

    At the same price level, its the same.

    If u think that u will get anything better from anyone else @ $130, than u are mistaking.

    I prefer ASUS, but not any of those bellow Z77 - V.

    For that is a better deal to go with ASRock.

    ASUS priced those too high. IMHO

    Gigabyte makes solid mobos as well. But ASRock rocks at the budget models.
  8. nikorr said:
    What about this one? You know, u are getting pretty good CPU, but only less than average mobo. Why is that? Mobo is more important than u think.

    This one will let u OC much easier and it will stay stable even in higher overclock, while that Biostar will not be able to take the heat.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157298

    http://pureoverclock.com/images/review/motherboards/asrock_z77fatal1ty/asrock_z77fatal1ty_0.jpg


    Well this is going to be my first 100% custom built computer and I'm open to suggestions but I have been looking at this new motherboard since I looked at the reviews of my previously selected motherboard (most of them pretty bad.) So I would like to hear about what you think of this motherboard.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130647

    In my opinion it looks great (that dark blue looks fantastic,) it's cheap $104.99 ($89.99 after mail in rebate,) has 2 PCI 3.0 slots because it gives a 10% performance boost to 7970 graphic cards so I plan on buying one card now and buying another one later [when they get cheaper and/or my games can't be played with high frame rates (40fps or lower on high settings)]

    Do you think this would be a good quality motherboard for the price and features it has on it?
  9. OK, do u need Micro ATX ?
  10. I do not really need it I am going to put it in a HAF 922XM so it supports that m-atx, atx and e-atx

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119257

    Is there something wrong with mirco atx's or will I get a better deal if I go with a regular atx?
  11. Best answer
    I would go with ATX mobo. It would run hot with all that hardware.

    Get this one instead.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130644
  12. Case is great, but still, mATX for gaming is not the best thing to do.

    mATX are for small PC's or HTPC.
  13. nikorr said:
    I would go with ATX mobo. It would run hot with all that hardware.

    Get this one instead.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130644


    Well I'm liking it and I would like to know about the raid options it features (if you know) how does raid 0, 1, 5, 10 work?I'm planning on using it on 2 60GB SSD cards and I would like to know what would be the best to use.
  14. SSD to raid?

    I wouldn't. In fact, instead of two 60GB ssd's in a RAID0 array,

    I recommend a single 120GB ssd.

    If you just want bragging rights, to experiment, or to perform some sort of complicated task that could make use of ssd's in a RAID array, then go for it.

    Otherwise a RAID array is not necessary on SSD.
  15. nikorr said:
    SSD to raid?

    I wouldn't. In fact, instead of two 60GB ssd's in a RAID0 array,

    I recommend a single 120GB ssd.

    If you just want bragging rights, to experiment, or to perform some sort of complicated task that could make use of ssd's in a RAID array, then go for it.

    Otherwise a RAID array is not necessary on SSD.


    Don't you recieve 1GB reads and about 800MB writes doesn't that boost start up and other applications? Or do the read and writes remain the same as if you only used 1?
  16. In benchmarks, but it will not help anything to your start up : )
  17. nikorr said:
    In benchmarks, but it will not help anything to your start up : )


    So what kind of benifits will I recieve then if I raid 0 two 60gb ssd? Like will I be able to load or install things faster?
  18. Great benchmarks : )

    But there is no TRIM support in RAID.

    RAID0 SSDs (Especially with 60GB models) will offer no appreciable increase in speed,

    will introduce an additional point of failure and will lose the ability to TRIM.

    Just get a single 120GB drive.

    Remember that SSDs internally are a RAID0 of flash chips with 60 GB drives having 1/2 as many chips in cases.
  19. It is the same basic type of RAID that Intel introduced with it's Intel Matrix Storage and now calls Rapid Storage Technology.

    It relies on software drivers for full functionality.

    You will not find a true "hardware" RAID controller on a consumer grade desktop motherboard. RAID 0 is a misnomer as there is no redundancy and actually increases the risk of data loss.
  20. But, go right ahead, there is a benefit for sure, but not what u think.

    Or not as much, as u think : ))
  21. nikorr said:
    It is the same basic type of RAID that Intel introduced with it's Intel Matrix Storage and now calls Rapid Storage Technology.

    It relies on software drivers for full functionality.

    You will not find a true "hardware" RAID controller on a consumer grade desktop motherboard. RAID 0 is a misnomer as there is no redundancy and actually increases the risk of data loss.


    Ok thanks for the advice and quick reponces I'll settle for the 120gb ssd.
  22. Best answer selected by Pwned_By_My_ComputerZ.
  23. Many people had the idea to use 2 smaller and cheaper SSD's in RAID. :D

    Me too.
  24. You're welcome!
  25. This topic has been closed by Nikorr
Ask a new question

Read More

Motherboards Intel Processors Product