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Is this a good build?

Last response: in Systems
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July 8, 2011 9:22:14 PM

AMD Athlon II 64 X4 645 Quad-Core 3.1GHz Processor AM3

AMD STANDARD COOLING FAN

Asus M4A78LT-M Socket AM3/ AMD 760G/ A&V&GbE/ MATX Motherboard

4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 1333MHz (PC3 10600) Dual Channel

Hitachi / WD 1TB 7200 RPM 32MB CACHE SATA 3.0Gb/s

24X DUAL LAYER DVD-RW W/LIGHTSCRIBE

ATI Radeon HD 3000 FULL HD 1080p 512MB DVI/HDTV PCI-Express Video Card (Onboard)

REALTEK 8-CHANNEL DIGITAL SOUND ONBOARD

REALTEK 10/100/1000 Gigabit Network Card (onboard)

APEVIA X-Plorer2 Case w/ Side Window-Blue

(2X) OKIA 80MM CASE COOLER

hec X ORION 585 WATT POWER SUPPLY (MEDIUM LOAD)

GeForce 460 SE Video Card (dedicated)

3-Year Limited Warranty Plan with Lifetime of free USA based Support...Custom Hand Wiring For Ultimate Air Flow, Assembled in Cleveland, Ohio, USA

GRAND TOTAL: 548$ All prebuilt, must add dedicated card myself.

QUESTION 1: Are all the parts of good quality?
QUESTION 2 Will everything work well together? (ex: mobo and gpu etc.)
QUESTION 3: Is the PSU large enough and of good enough quality for my rig?
QUESTION 4: Is it a good deal?

I think its a very good deal for a prebuilt but I want other opinions, thanks. :sol: 

More about : good build

July 8, 2011 10:22:02 PM

That's your budget? Gaming?
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July 8, 2011 10:37:42 PM

HEC power supplies are always suspect.
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July 9, 2011 4:10:35 AM

looks good. the cpu will work great with the mobo. ram will work too. looks good bro :) 

for being prebuilt it looks good.
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July 9, 2011 5:38:56 AM

Graphics card is bad, but you already noted that. PSU is crap. Use it in a non-important machine. Buy a cheaper, decent PSU. Usually there are some decent 430W or higher Thermaltake, Antec, or Corsair units. There are scads of Corsair Builder Series PSU's on sale now. Pick one up and you will be golden. (Look at around a 500W unit, Should suit you well.) Also, if this is a pre-fab machine, it may be missing some normally expected items, such as extra RAM slots, PCI-X slot, IDE/SATA ports. It is commone for companies like Dell, HP, Gateway, etc...to use boards that are very similar to models avaliable to end users through newegg, tigerdirect, etc... without unnecessary items. It drives the cost down to eliminate items on a board that isn't used in most peoples machines. I just had an HP, Asus mobo missing a PCI-E slot. Had the holes and everything, just not physical connector. I've gotten Gigabyte boards missing memory channels. It's common practice to leave these out because customers buying pre-fab boxes are unlikely to use those extra solts/ports.

Make sure you get a model number for a board you can find online. If you can't, it is probably a custom board for OEM's that neglects some features YOU expect.

Let us know your findings!
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