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HAF 932 Case Questions

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  • Homebuilt
  • Cases
  • Front Panel
  • USB3
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
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July 11, 2011 3:18:42 AM

I read this on a HAF 932 review:

Quote:
Cons: The front panel USB 3.0 ports have a motherboard header connector which isnt what I was expecting based on what I had seen with the 942 case, which that one is designed to just plug in to USB 3.0 ports. Since I assumed that this one would be the same, I purchased a USB 3.0 PCI Express card with internal 3.0 jacks, only to find out that wasnt going to work, since I needed an actual USB 3.0 Header to connect the front panel ports to. Not going to knock off an egg for that one, since I didnt do my homework first, but it would be nice if they just included an adapter for it.


What does that mean? What is a USB 3.0 header and why does it matter? Do I have to make sure my motherboard has this? Do I have to buy this separately to get the front panel USB 3.0 outlets to work?

If I want optimum cooling out of this case, do I need to buy any extra fans?

Do you recommend this over an HAF X for dual crossfire setup?

I read you can buy dust filters for this case. How would I find them, and how would I know that they would fit?

Do you have this case? If so, could you list any cons, please? Have you done any customization?

Off the subject, but is there any reason to get after market thermal paste for mounting your CPU cooler?

Thank you.

More about : haf 932 case questions

a b B Homebuilt system
July 11, 2011 3:48:41 AM

Quite a lot of questions!

Yes, I have the HAF 932 case. This is the old style, which is different from the HAF 932 Advanced case. The 932 Advanced case needs internal USB 3 pin headers on the motherboard into which the front panel USB 3 cables must be plugged into.

The fans that come with the case are adequate for cooling. However, you may consider installing a bottom fan (I did).

My preference would be the HAF X over the HAF 932 Advanced based on specs and videos.

I use my HAF 932 without filters. I don't know where to find them or buy them, and do not have the patience to design my own using filter material.

I have this case, and my only con is that it weighs 29 pounds. Heavy!

I prefer Arctic Silver 5 as the thermal compound. There are a few others just as good, but I will stay with AS5.
July 11, 2011 8:33:13 PM

Ubrales said:
Quite a lot of questions!

Yes, I have the HAF 932 case. This is the old style, which is different from the HAF 932 Advanced case. The 932 Advanced case needs internal USB 3 pin headers on the motherboard into which the front panel USB 3 cables must be plugged into.

The fans that come with the case are adequate for cooling. However, you may consider installing a bottom fan (I did).

My preference would be the HAF X over the HAF 932 Advanced based on specs and videos.

I use my HAF 932 without filters. I don't know where to find them or buy them, and do not have the patience to design my own using filter material.

I have this case, and my only con is that it weighs 29 pounds. Heavy!

I prefer Arctic Silver 5 as the thermal compound. There are a few others just as good, but I will stay with AS5.


Thanks for the answers!

So my MB needs "internal USB 3.0" ports to use the ports on the front panel. Is that right?

As far as thermal compound, what makes any after market stuff better? I really do not understand. Is it cooler when OC'n your CPU or is it mandatory regardless? CPUs come with generic thermal compound dont they?

Thanks again for your responses. I'm definitely sold on a CM HAF case, just not sure which yet.
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 11, 2011 9:53:57 PM

timothy2180 said:
Thanks for the answers!

So my MB needs "internal USB 3.0" ports to use the ports on the front panel. Is that right?

As far as thermal compound, what makes any after market stuff better? I really do not understand. Is it cooler when OC'n your CPU or is it mandatory regardless? CPUs come with generic thermal compound dont they?

Thanks again for your responses. I'm definitely sold on a CM HAF case, just not sure which yet.

Yes, the motherboard must have USB 3 pin headers for this Case.

The thermal compound supplied with the CPU is just like the heatsink supplied with the boxed processors; average quality. They will do an average job. However, for any kind of overclock, or just for better performance, after-market heatsinks, and after-market thermal compounds (like Arctic Silver 5) are used. And for this reason, after-market thermal compounds are better because they have better heat transfer characteristics.

http://www.extremeoverclocking.com/reviews/cooling/Ther...
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Thermal-Compound...
http://www.overclock3d.net/reviews/cases_cooling/battle...

The Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced is a great case. So is the HAF X. Pick either one and you will not go wrong! Both have great air flow.
July 11, 2011 11:03:51 PM

Ubrales said:
Yes, the motherboard must have USB 3 pin headers for this Case.

The thermal compound supplied with the CPU is just like the heatsink supplied with the boxed processors; average quality. They will do an average job. However, for any kind of overclock, or just for better performance, after-market heatsinks, and after-market thermal compounds (like Arctic Silver 5) are used. And for this reason, after-market thermal compounds are better because they have better heat transfer characteristics.

http://www.extremeoverclocking.com/reviews/cooling/Ther...
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Thermal-Compound...
http://www.overclock3d.net/reviews/cases_cooling/battle...

The Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced is a great case. So is the HAF X. Pick either one and you will not go wrong! Both have great air flow.


You have been extremely helpful, Ubrales; thanks. I have one other question. I believe all of the HAF cases are setup with the same "cutout" for a CPU. How does that work? I'm trying to imagine setting up a motherboard in a case. The last time I did this was 2008, so maybe things have changed but I don't think they have. How does this cutout work?

The side of the motherboard that everything connects to faces the "left" side of the HAF case, like most cases. But, to me, it looks like the cutout is behind the motherboard? As if you would mount your CPU on the right side? Am I seeing this wrong? Does the cutout go to the left of the motherboard? What is the purpose of the cutout?

Sorry to be a pain, but this one thing has been bugging me. Thanks again. I am reading the thermal paste review on extremeoverclocking right now.
a b B Homebuilt system
July 12, 2011 2:50:26 AM

The HAF 932 Advanced as well as other HAF, and cases from other manufacturers, have a cutout right beneath where the CPU/heatsink is assembled. This cutout is to enable changing (or re-seating) of the CPU, or the heatsink without the need to dismantle everything else.

All that is required is to remove the right side panel of the case; this is the panel next to the underside of the motherboard. Once this right side panel is removed, the mounting brackets that fasten the CPU/heatsink to the motherboard will be visible. This will facilitate easy removal of the heatsink, and subsequent removal of the CPU (or re-seat CPU/heatsink) if necessary.

Here is a nice video - computer building, HAF 932! - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yer955E7T6w

With the HAF 932, you will need a 12" extension for the 8-pins power cable that supplies power to the CPU via the 8-pins connector on the motherboard. This extension will enable you to tuck this cable behind the motherboard mounting panel for neatness and better air flow.
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