Memtest86+ Fail when test together

CPU: AMD Athlon IIx4 635

Motherboard: Biostar A785G3

Ram: Slot 1 - G-Skill 4GB DDR3-1333 (PC3 10666)
Slot 2 - Kingston 2GB DDR3-1333

1. I have never change the BIO since I have added the G-Skill 4GB ram.
2. A few weeks ago the system started crashing (Blue Screen).
3. I have tried using the BlueScreenView to see if I could find solution online.
4. Updated the driver but still having the same problem.
5. Tried running the Memtest86+, froze at certain % (Test #4) when testing them together.
6. Tested both ram individually in both slots, nothing wrong according to the test.
7. Checked the BIO and found that the voltage for ram was higher than required (1.7V, required is 1.5V)
8. Still crashing/not able to pass the ram test when both ram are plugged in.

Can someone help me with my problem?
I am not sure what information I should include here.
Please let me know and I will try my best to update it.

Thanks
5 answers Last reply
More about memtest86 fail test together
  1. KennyJo said:
    CPU: AMD Athlon IIx4 635

    Motherboard: Biostar A785G3

    Ram: Slot 1 - G-Skill 4GB DDR3-1333 (PC3 10666)
    Slot 2 - Kingston 2GB DDR3-1333

    Quote:
    6. Tested both ram individually in both slots, nothing wrong according to the test.


    Thanks

    You solved the problem yourself, mixing RAM often creates a problem which is why RAM is sold in kits. Further, many older MOBO's either shut-down (disable) a DIMM Slot or simply drop-out (BSOD) if the Channel Sizes are different.

    In your manual see page 9, I would assume this is your current underlying issue:
    Quote:
    "The DRAM bus width of the memory module must be the same (x8 or x16)"


    Therefore, use "Slot 1 - G-Skill 4GB DDR3-1333 (PC3 10666)" and I assume you are running a 64-bit OS with >4GB of RAM. So if you need more RAM my best advice is to purchase an identical 4GB stick of your current G.SKILL 4GB stick. Then rerun Memtest86+ to validate the 2x4GB in your system.
  2. jaquith said:
    Quote:
    "The DRAM bus width of the memory module must be the same (x8 or x16)"


    Therefore, use "Slot 1 - G-Skill 4GB DDR3-1333 (PC3 10666)" and I assume you are running a 64-bit OS with >4GB of RAM. So if you need more RAM my best advice is to purchase an identical 4GB stick of your current G.SKILL 4GB stick. Then rerun Memtest86+ to validate the 2x4GB in your system.


    Thanks for your reply.

    Since I am very new to the hardware part, could you please tell me what do you mean by "The DRAM bus width of the memory module must be the same (x8 or x16)" and how can I find information about that?

    How about 2 different brand ram with the same capacity and speed?
    About half a year ago, I was using a Crucial 2GB DDR3 - 1333 (7-7-7-24) ram with my Kingston ram.
    At that time I knew nothing about hardware and when the bluescreen started to show up, I thought the Crucial ram was broken and switch to the 4GB G-Skill ram which I am using now.

    Anyway, could you please also tell me why this happen suddenly?
    I think if they are incapable to each other, the problem should happen within the last 6 months.... (or I am too luck with that????)

    Thanks
  3. Memory geometry / Memory Chip - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_geometry#Memory_chip

    Regarding 2GB Crucial + 2GB Kingston they have the same density and as long as the BIOS used the slower CAS in that cas 9-9-9-'27' the PC would run but if the BIOS read the 7-7-7-24 the you would have had failures - dumb luck.

    My advice is to, as per my motto, "Do it Right..." and not "Do it Wrong" or half baked.

    Try reversing the DIMM slots.

    IF you post the EXACT CAS Timings and EXACT Voltages per the (2) kits then you can 'try' to manually input the slowest CAS Timing values and either the average DRAM Voltage or use the highest of the (2) sticks.
  4. jaquith said:
    Memory geometry / Memory Chip - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_geometry#Memory_chip

    Regarding 2GB Crucial + 2GB Kingston they have the same density and as long as the BIOS used the slower CAS in that cas 9-9-9-'27' the PC would run but if the BIOS read the 7-7-7-24 the you would have had failures - dumb luck.

    My advice is to, as per my motto, "Do it Right..." and not "Do it Wrong" or half baked.

    Try reversing the DIMM slots.

    IF you post the EXACT CAS Timings and EXACT Voltages per the (2) kits then you can 'try' to manually input the slowest CAS Timing values and either the average DRAM Voltage or use the highest of the (2) sticks.


    Thanks for the information.

    Actually is there any other reason that may cause my problem?
    I want to make sure buying a new ram is going to fix the problem.
    And I believe here is nothing bad to learn more about computer.
  5. Nope I'm pretty confident the problem is mixing your RAM. Often with older AMD's I also recommend using the latest BIOS version. Only flash your BIOS from the BIOS and not Windows.
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