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Finished build, but Heatsink fan runs at high speed and says 87 degree

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July 15, 2011 7:28:40 PM

Just put together my computer and it's up and running. I have it installing Windoes right now but the fan is going crazy (CPU fan). I have the stock i5 2500k one. In the bios when I first looked it said the CPU was at 87C. I did t change any settings. Is this normal?


Thanks for any help. This is my first build and I'm kinda concerned lol.
July 15, 2011 7:48:14 PM

mojoe_24 said:
Just put together my computer and it's up and running. I have it installing Windoes right now but the fan is going crazy (CPU fan). I have the stock i5 2500k one. In the bios when I first looked it said the CPU was at 87C. I did t change any settings. Is this normal?


Thanks for any help. This is my first build and I'm kinda concerned lol.




Did you apply the thermal grease right? If using stock heatsink, did you take off the piece of plastic that is over the pre-applied thermal grease? Is the heatsink on the cpu proper and is it snugg to the cpu? Also, you sure it isn't saying 87F? I don't own an i5, but I don't think any processor should be running that hot, ecspecially in the bios under no significant load.

I said the thing about the plastic, because my first build years go, I forgot to take off the plastic and the computer would shut down 10 secs after start. I took it to a local computer repair place and they figured it out and didn't charge me a thing for the trouble. I tried to pay them something but the would not accept it. Good guys. (I still buy stuff from them in a pinch even though their retail prices are a little high) If you are still having trouble after you answer the questions I asked, take it to a local neighborhood computer repair shop (not best buy or any other rip off chain).
July 15, 2011 7:59:18 PM

87°C is way too hot for the cold boot startup. Check that your heatsink is securely fastened to the mobo.
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July 15, 2011 8:02:42 PM

Piece of plastic? There wasn't anything in the instructions about that.


<E> Pulled it apart. There is like a grey paste stuck on teh bottom of the heatsink and top of CPU. Is that it?
July 15, 2011 8:33:11 PM

Just reapplied it and have it sitting here watching the Bios' temp readout. Started at 36 and has slowly climbed. Sitting at 43C right now.


<E> Seems to be running cooler, but it still sitting at 48C. Is that because I took it off adn didn't put more thermal paste on?
July 15, 2011 9:24:15 PM

If you took the heat sink off and didn't clean it all off and reapply new paste you should probably do that. Make sure your heat sink is seated correctly like T_T said.
July 15, 2011 10:49:57 PM

Yeah the Intel pins you just push down, no turning with a screwdriver. You should hear an audible click when pushing the pins in (just don't force it too hard! Don't want to break the pins).

If you tool the cooler off I would advise removing and reapplying thermal paste.
July 16, 2011 1:10:58 AM

Some points:

1) run a stress test using a multi-core compatible program (there's a multi-core Prime 95 version out there). Modern CPU's will crash before they die of overheating. If your CPU can be stressed without crashing there's no problem.

*How hot your CPU is depends also on how good your Heatsink+Fan is. A good HSF can drop the temperature by 20degrees over a stock fan. I STRONGLY advise you replace a stock HSF if possible just to reduce noise.

2) Observe that your CPU fan varies in speed. If it does not, check the following:
a) CPU fan is connected to the motherboard CPU fan connector
b) BIOS setting is correct. Usually a choice of Auto, Voltage or PWM. My stock fan required Auto or PWM but my non-stock HSF required Voltage.

***Your temperature sounds pretty normal now. You need only to decide if you want a non-stock HSF (if you don't already) and check that your fan speed changes.

If you use a CPU stress program you should hear your fan speed increase drastically within a few seconds of starting it. If you hear no change your CPU fan is likely at 100% already and you definitely don't want that much noise.

OTHER:
A typical gaming setup should have a cooling solution like this:
1) 2 or 3 120mm case fans (500-800RPM. CONSTANT SPEED ONLY. Probably use the 4-pin Molex for power. Use front-bottom of case for #1, #2 should be top-rear or top-top and inline with the CPU fan and #3 is OPTIONAL and is either top-top or top-rear, whichever was not used by #2 fan)

2) graphics card (automatic)

3) PSU (automatic). I prefer bottom of case such as Antec. If at the top, note that most people show the PSU with the intake fan INSIDE the case. DO. NOT. DO. THIS!! It sucks in hot air into the PSU forcing its fan to spin more and reduces the stability of the PSU. Make sure neither fan is directly inside the case.

4) CPU HSF. A non-stock HSF with large heatsink and 120mm fan is usually ideal. The more expensive ones tend to be too large and heavy (basically overkill). $30 to $50 is usually a good range. Also, check out NCIX even if you can't buy from them. It's got a good collection and comments.

Always measure the HSF to your case. Some motherboards have heatsinks, RAM, or a top PCIe slot which would interfere with a large HSF.

I prefer a HSF which has a 120mm fan that faces to the REAR of the case as it tends to force air over the RAM more than if it faced straight up.
July 16, 2011 2:06:48 AM

LOL. Now Windows won't install. It just sits at Expanding Windows Files.
!