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Signifigance of CF Speed

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March 15, 2005 5:29:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

About 8 months ago I bought a Canon Camera. It
came with a 32 mb CF card.

I am thinking about getting a bigger CF.
What is the speed of the card I got (it doesn't
say)?

How important is the speed of the CF?

More about : signifigance speed

March 15, 2005 5:29:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

It depends how advanced your camera is. Is it an SLR & does it have a
motor drive, or is it a $200 point & shoot? The high end cameras all
have a large buffer to handle the motor drive shots. If you need to
fire off more than 20 shots within a 30 second period, you'll need to
have a high speed card in order to empty the buffer & shoot again. For
a point & shoot, you won't need one faster than a 1X (150kb/sec.)

Winston
March 15, 2005 5:29:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

It depends how advanced your camera is. Is it an SLR & does it have a
motor drive, or is it a $200 point & shoot? The high end cameras all
have a large buffer to handle the motor drive shots. If you need to
fire off more than 20 shots within a 30 second period, you'll need to
have a high speed card in order to empty the buffer & shoot again. For
a point & shoot, you won't need one faster than a 1X (150kb/sec.)

Winston
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March 15, 2005 5:29:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Winston" <bobo44039@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:1110918348.566084.43790@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> It depends how advanced your camera is. Is it an SLR & does it have a
> motor drive, or is it a $200 point & shoot? The high end cameras all
> have a large buffer to handle the motor drive shots. If you need to
> fire off more than 20 shots within a 30 second period, you'll need to
> have a high speed card in order to empty the buffer & shoot again. For
> a point & shoot, you won't need one faster than a 1X (150kb/sec.)

That last claim is ridiculous. We saw drastic improvements
(review speed, lag times when writing movie clips etc) in our
very low-end A40 when we switched from regular Sandisk
to Sandisk Ultra II.
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 5:29:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> It depends how advanced your camera is. Is it an SLR & does it have a
> motor drive, or is it a $200 point & shoot? The high end cameras all
> have a large buffer to handle the motor drive shots. If you need to
> fire off more than 20 shots within a 30 second period, you'll need to
> have a high speed card in order to empty the buffer & shoot again. For
> a point & shoot, you won't need one faster than a 1X (150kb/sec.)

It would seem somewhat the opposite to me. I have a relatively slow card
in both my Digital Rebel XT and my point-and-shoot. With the buffer of the
DR XT, the write speed of the card isn't much of a concern - at least not
until I've fired at least 12 burst shots. On the other hand, in my
point-and-shoot with no buffer, the slow card means an extra second or two
between *every* shot. My chances of missing a subsequent shot are a lot
higher with the P&S than the DR XT.

teve
March 15, 2005 6:50:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Winston wrote:
> It depends how advanced your camera is. Is it an SLR & does it have a
> motor drive, or is it a $200 point & shoot? The high end cameras all
> have a large buffer to handle the motor drive shots. If you need to
> fire off more than 20 shots within a 30 second period, you'll need to
> have a high speed card in order to empty the buffer & shoot again. For
> a point & shoot, you won't need one faster than a 1X (150kb/sec.)
>
> Winston
>

S50
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 6:51:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Al <ecarecar@yahoo.com> writes:

> About 8 months ago I bought a Canon Camera. It
> came with a 32 mb CF card.
>
> I am thinking about getting a bigger CF.
> What is the speed of the card I got (it doesn't
> say)?
>
> How important is the speed of the CF?

It depends on the camera. Many prosumer cameras aren't that fast about writing
to the CF card, so faster media is wasted (though faster media will upload
faster if you are using a USB 2.0/firewire card reader). Many of the DSLRs
have some amount of optimization for high speed cards built in.

--
Michael Meissner
email: mrmnews@the-meissners.org
http://www.the-meissners.org
March 15, 2005 6:54:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Winston wrote:
> It depends how advanced your camera is. Is it an SLR & does it have a
> motor drive, or is it a $200 point & shoot? The high end cameras all
> have a large buffer to handle the motor drive shots. If you need to
> fire off more than 20 shots within a 30 second period, you'll need to
> have a high speed card in order to empty the buffer & shoot again. For
> a point & shoot, you won't need one faster than a 1X (150kb/sec.)
>
> Winston
>

The CF card says Canon, but the copyright is SanDisk.
March 15, 2005 10:34:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Al" <ecarecar@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:113eds7p515gu7b@corp.supernews.com...
> About 8 months ago I bought a Canon Camera. It
> came with a 32 mb CF card.
>
> I am thinking about getting a bigger CF.
> What is the speed of the card I got (it doesn't
> say)?
Could you perchance tell us who made the card?
>
> How important is the speed of the CF?
Not very.

Doesn't the manual tell you what speed is appropriate for your camera?
Jim
March 15, 2005 10:34:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Jim wrote:
> "Al" <ecarecar@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:113eds7p515gu7b@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>About 8 months ago I bought a Canon Camera. It
>>came with a 32 mb CF card.
>>
>>I am thinking about getting a bigger CF.
>>What is the speed of the card I got (it doesn't
>>say)?
>
> Could you perchance tell us who made the card?
>
>>How important is the speed of the CF?
>
> Not very.
>
> Doesn't the manual tell you what speed is appropriate for your camera?
> Jim
>
Duuuuhhh. I never thought of that.
I checked. It doesn't say a word.
March 15, 2005 10:34:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Al" <ecarecar@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:113eg0rh137h88@corp.supernews.com...
> Jim wrote:
> > "Al" <ecarecar@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> > news:113eds7p515gu7b@corp.supernews.com...
> >
> >>About 8 months ago I bought a Canon Camera. It
> >>came with a 32 mb CF card.
> >>
> >>I am thinking about getting a bigger CF.
> >>What is the speed of the card I got (it doesn't
> >>say)?
> >
> > Could you perchance tell us who made the card?
> >
> >>How important is the speed of the CF?
> >
> > Not very.
> >
> > Doesn't the manual tell you what speed is appropriate for your camera?
> > Jim
> >
> Duuuuhhh. I never thought of that.
> I checked. It doesn't say a word.

Most of Canon's point-and-shoot models ship with relatively
slow CF memory made by SimpleTech (it's around 8x speed).

One way or another (whether it's review times, writing times
for burst mode/movie clips etc) you will see improvements
with faster memory. Get the fastest memory you can afford.
March 16, 2005 9:04:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mikey wrote:

> you will see improvements with faster memory.
> Get the fastest memory you can afford.

Don't spend money that doen't pay you back. On my Nikon 5400 a standard Sandisk
128MB card is actually a little bit faster than the 1 gig Sandisk ultra II card I
have. Until I upgrade my computer I don't have a fast transfer option, so the extra
$20 for the Ultra card hasn't gotten me anything extra. I don't need to get the card
downloaded within a few minutes, so it's really not a problem, and I may manage to
put off the computer upgrade for a while yet.

If the OP is only "thinking" about something bigger than 32MB, then he apparently
doesn't require high transfer speeds (yet) either, so the camera's write speed is
what's important, especially if he doesn't have a fast transfer option without a
computer upgrade. Trying a fast card before paying for it might be a good idea.


--
Steve

The above can be construed as personal opinion in the absence of a reasonable
belief that it was intended as a statement of fact.

If you want a reply to reach me, remove the SPAMTRAP from the address.
March 16, 2005 2:16:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Steve wrote:
>
>
> Mikey wrote:
>
>> you will see improvements with faster memory.
>
> > Get the fastest memory you can afford.
>
> Don't spend money that doen't pay you back. On my Nikon 5400 a standard
> Sandisk 128MB card is actually a little bit faster than the 1 gig
> Sandisk ultra II card I have. Until I upgrade my computer I don't have a
> fast transfer option, so the extra $20 for the Ultra card hasn't gotten
> me anything extra. I don't need to get the card downloaded within a few
> minutes, so it's really not a problem, and I may manage to put off the
> computer upgrade for a while yet.
>
> If the OP is only "thinking" about something bigger than 32MB, then he
> apparently doesn't require high transfer speeds (yet) either, so the
> camera's write speed is what's important, especially if he doesn't have
> a fast transfer option without a computer upgrade. Trying a fast card
> before paying for it might be a good idea.
>

OP here.

The data for at least one picture - if not more - is written
to internal memory in the camera, isn't it? Does the speed of
the card have anything to do with the operation of the camera?
Anonymous
March 16, 2005 7:38:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Al wrote:
[]
> OP here.
>
> The data for at least one picture - if not more - is written
> to internal memory in the camera, isn't it? Does the speed of
> the card have anything to do with the operation of the camera?

Yes, for when the internal memory runs out (as when using rapid or
continuous shooting) and for reviewing the pictures.
Faster cards may also read into your computer more quickly if you have a
USB 2.0 or Firewire reader.

David
March 16, 2005 7:38:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"David J Taylor" <david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk> wrote in message
news:XhZZd.5340$QN1.4842@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> Al wrote:
> []
> > OP here.
> >
> > The data for at least one picture - if not more - is written
> > to internal memory in the camera, isn't it? Does the speed of
> > the card have anything to do with the operation of the camera?
>
> Yes, for when the internal memory runs out (as when using rapid or
> continuous shooting) and for reviewing the pictures.

-- and for writing movie clips, if your camera has a movie mode.

> Faster cards may also read into your computer more quickly if you have a
> USB 2.0 or Firewire reader.

Especially true. I get over 10MB/s with Sandisk Ultra II and
their USB2.0 card reader. But Steve's point is a good one --
it's best to try before you buy if possible, to see how much your
particular setup will benefit from the faster memory.
!