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Revolution will play Gamecube games, has WiFi Built-In

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Anonymous
March 11, 2005 8:20:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

Good thing Nintendo will finally enable backwards compatibility with
previous-generation console games. something they've been doing with
the gameboy line for years

Revolution confirmed to be backwards compatible with Gamecube

http://cube.ign.com/articles/594/594935p1.html

....and it's not a mistranslation either. Iwata clearly spoke it in
english, and Nintendo had slides-you can watch the whole hour-long
keynote here, too hear and see for yourself:
http://www.tinyurl.com/4aphd
(streaming or 700MB d/l)



http://www.gamespot.com/news/2005/03/10/news_6120151.ht...

Confirming earlier rumors, Iwata said the device would have built-in
Wi-Fi connectivity, "which will allow users around the world to connect
with one another wirelessly." While he carefully avoided the word
"online," Iwata implied that Nintendo will apparently reverse its
long-standing policy of abstaining from online gaming with its
forthcoming machine, saying it would have sort of the same Wi-Fi
functions as the soon-to-be-online DS. He also said development kits
for the device would be sent out by the time of the E3 expo in May, and
that it would be backward compatible with GameCube titles.

Iwata also let the audience peer into the guts of the Revolution, which
he more elegantly referred to as the device's "technological heart."
Like the next Xbox, it will be powered by a custom central processor
from IBM, in this case code-named "Broadway." It will also sport a
graphics card--code-named "Hollywood"--from ATI, which is also making
the GPU for the next Xbox. "We're excited to be developing the graphics
chip set for Revolution, which continues our long-standing relationship
with Nintendo," said ATI president and CEO Dave Orton in a statement.
March 12, 2005 9:25:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

<videogamedude@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1110590417.947334.270840@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Good thing Nintendo will finally enable backwards compatibility with
> previous-generation console games. something they've been doing with
> the gameboy line for years
>
> Revolution confirmed to be backwards compatible with Gamecube
>
> http://cube.ign.com/articles/594/594935p1.html
>
> ...and it's not a mistranslation either. Iwata clearly spoke it in
> english, and Nintendo had slides-you can watch the whole hour-long
> keynote here, too hear and see for yourself:
> http://www.tinyurl.com/4aphd
> (streaming or 700MB d/l)

Just watched the entire hour. Interesting. Certaintly looking forward to
the new Zelda and Mario Kart DS. The NDS virtual dog thing also looks like
some fun.

Still a little disappointed with their vision for wireless over the NDS
though. I can see where they are coming from by wanting it to be as
seamless as possible, not requiring entering/choosing SSIDs, or entering WEP
keys, ect -- but at the same time have to wonder if doing so will seriously
be limiting the potential of wireless. If they took advantage of already
existing 802.11 infrastructure using just TCP/IP, their little "Mario Kart
DS" demo could've had eight people playing together not just on stage but
from anywhere on the planet.

The PSP will certaintly be using standard 802.11. The Nintendo DS is
capable of 2 Mbs 802.11b, which is plenty of BW for connected gaming. Don't
know why Nintendo isn't aggresively pursuing this. Hell, add an 802.11b
TCP/IP web browser and email client for the NDS and my PDA will be listed on
Ebay.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 9:10:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

"Eric" <ericmau001a@hotmail.remove.com> wrote in message
news:LuGYd.772$iv4.143@fe1.columbus.rr.com...
>
> <videogamedude@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1110590417.947334.270840@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>> Good thing Nintendo will finally enable backwards compatibility with
>> previous-generation console games. something they've been doing with
>> the gameboy line for years
>>
>> Revolution confirmed to be backwards compatible with Gamecube
>>
>> http://cube.ign.com/articles/594/594935p1.html
>>
>> ...and it's not a mistranslation either. Iwata clearly spoke it in
>> english, and Nintendo had slides-you can watch the whole hour-long
>> keynote here, too hear and see for yourself:
>> http://www.tinyurl.com/4aphd
>> (streaming or 700MB d/l)
>
> Just watched the entire hour. Interesting. Certaintly looking forward to
> the new Zelda and Mario Kart DS. The NDS virtual dog thing also looks
> like
> some fun.
>
> Still a little disappointed with their vision for wireless over the NDS
> though. I can see where they are coming from by wanting it to be as
> seamless as possible, not requiring entering/choosing SSIDs, or entering
> WEP
> keys, ect -- but at the same time have to wonder if doing so will
> seriously
> be limiting the potential of wireless. If they took advantage of already
> existing 802.11 infrastructure using just TCP/IP, their little "Mario Kart
> DS" demo could've had eight people playing together not just on stage but
> from anywhere on the planet.
>
> The PSP will certaintly be using standard 802.11. The Nintendo DS is
> capable of 2 Mbs 802.11b, which is plenty of BW for connected gaming.
> Don't
> know why Nintendo isn't aggresively pursuing this.

I thought Nintendo *were* pursuing WiFi, that seemed to be pretty much
exactly what they said. I'm going with the idea of almost completely
ignoring some of Nintendo's comment pre E3 2004 and before the Reggolution.

> Hell, add an 802.11b TCP/IP web browser and email client for the NDS and
> my PDA will be listed on
> Ebay.
>
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 9:12:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

Richard Strong wrote:
> I thought Nintendo *were* pursuing WiFi, that seemed to be pretty much
> exactly what they said. I'm going with the idea of almost completely
> ignoring some of Nintendo's comment pre E3 2004 and before the Reggolution.
>

"Reggolution," heh, I like that. Also, I agree, after the success of
X-Box live Nintendo can no longer say that console gamers don't want
online games. I don't think they ever believed that to begin with, it
was just an excuse for not having an online model for the GC. Remember,
they had an online service for the Super Famicom years and years ago.
There was even a custom Zelda title for it.

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March 19, 2005 3:47:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

"Richard Strong" wrote in message
>
> I thought Nintendo *were* pursuing WiFi, that seemed to be pretty much
> exactly what they said. I'm going with the idea of almost completely
> ignoring some of Nintendo's comment pre E3 2004 and before the
Reggolution.

I thought so too. They certainly threw the buzzwords of "wifi" and
"802.11b" in the PR's prior to the DS release.

This gave me the expectation of standard TCP/IP over 802.11b and playing
multiplayer games over the internet while in range of any hotspot.

Apparantly, this meant proprietary protocols for local wireless multiplayer
gaming.

Maybe Nintendo does have some plans for TCP/IP over 802.11b, but the
comments about "keeping things simple but not having users have to enter
SSIDs" doesn't sound too encouraging. Oh well, I'm sure third parties will
be all over it in given time.

Hell, Nintendo could've put together an internet "front-end" for the DS.
(Similiar to XBox Live). You play over the internet, but go through
Nintendo's front-end. Great for friends lists, messaging, ect. I would
easily be willing to give Nintendo $50/year for it.

Cheers,
-Eric
Anonymous
March 19, 2005 4:35:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

Eric wrote:
> This gave me the expectation of standard TCP/IP over 802.11b and playing
> multiplayer games over the internet while in range of any hotspot.
>
> Apparantly, this meant proprietary protocols for local wireless multiplayer
> gaming.
>

Wait, who says? Nintendo said "online" and "worldwide," or at least
Reggie Jackson did.

> Maybe Nintendo does have some plans for TCP/IP over 802.11b, but the
> comments about "keeping things simple but not having users have to enter
> SSIDs" doesn't sound too encouraging. Oh well, I'm sure third parties will
> be all over it in given time.
>
> Hell, Nintendo could've put together an internet "front-end" for the DS.
> (Similiar to XBox Live).


I thought that's what this whole thing was about! Am I the only one
reading Gamespot and IGN's news? IGN had an interview with Reggie that
is currently available only in video, it seems (I read the transcript
when it was first put up).

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Anonymous
March 19, 2005 4:38:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

Eric wrote:
> Hell, Nintendo could've put together an internet "front-end" for the
> DS. (Similiar to XBox Live). You play over the internet, but go
> through Nintendo's front-end. Great for friends lists, messaging,
> ect. I would easily be willing to give Nintendo $50/year for it.

Here, I found it:

> Starting later this year, Nintendo "will provide users with a link to
> other players across the country or around the world," according to
> a statement from Nintendo. DS owners will be able to connect to
> Nintendo's online service, which will be free, from any wireless hot
> spot using the DS's wireless connectivity, and play other owners of
> the dual-screen portable online. He said Nintendo's online
> infrastructure for the device--like the servers--was "already in
> place."

And later:

> Last but certainly not least, the at-times controversial executive
> Revolution. Confirming earlier rumors, Iwata said the device would
> have built-in Wi-Fi connectivity, "which will allow users around the
> world to connect with one another wirelessly." While he carefully
> avoided the word "online," Iwata implied that Nintendo will
> apparently reverse its long-standing policy of abstaining from online
> gaming with its forthcoming machine, saying it would have sort of the
> same Wi-Fi functions as the soon-to-be-online DS. He also said
> development kits for the device would be sent out by the time of the
> E3 expo in May, and that it would be backward compatible with
> GameCube titles.

You don't have to be Sherlock Holmes to read between the lines here:
Internet play for DS & Revolution by 2006. Nintendo always drops hints
like this. First he mentions the DS will use a worldwide online service
"from any wi-fi hotspot" which I assume will include home networks which
are easy to obtain and run, and then a little later mentions that
Revolution will have built-in wi-fi capabilities and gamers worldwide
will be able to play with eachother. That's actually less a hint than
it is a formal declaration of LET THE ONLINE MARIO KART TOURNAMENTS
BEGIN!!!...next year.

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G e !h !r !y
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March 27, 2005 3:04:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

"Jacob Oost" <zork@columbus.rr.com> wrote in
> Eric wrote:
> > Hell, Nintendo could've put together an internet "front-end" for the
> > DS. (Similiar to XBox Live). You play over the internet, but go
> > through Nintendo's front-end. Great for friends lists, messaging,
> > ect. I would easily be willing to give Nintendo $50/year for it.
>
> Here, I found it:
>
> > Starting later this year, Nintendo "will provide users with a link to
> > other players across the country or around the world," according to
> > a statement from Nintendo. DS owners will be able to connect to
> > Nintendo's online service, which will be free, from any wireless hot
> > spot using the DS's wireless connectivity, and play other owners of
> > the dual-screen portable online. He said Nintendo's online
> > infrastructure for the device--like the servers--was "already in
> > place."
>
> And later:
>
> > Last but certainly not least, the at-times controversial executive
> > Revolution. Confirming earlier rumors, Iwata said the device would
> > have built-in Wi-Fi connectivity, "which will allow users around the
> > world to connect with one another wirelessly." While he carefully
> > avoided the word "online," Iwata implied that Nintendo will
> > apparently reverse its long-standing policy of abstaining from online
> > gaming with its forthcoming machine, saying it would have sort of the
> > same Wi-Fi functions as the soon-to-be-online DS. He also said
> > development kits for the device would be sent out by the time of the
> > E3 expo in May, and that it would be backward compatible with
> > GameCube titles.
>
> You don't have to be Sherlock Holmes to read between the lines here:
> Internet play for DS & Revolution by 2006. Nintendo always drops hints
> like this. First he mentions the DS will use a worldwide online service
> "from any wi-fi hotspot" which I assume will include home networks which
> are easy to obtain and run, and then a little later mentions that
> Revolution will have built-in wi-fi capabilities and gamers worldwide
> will be able to play with eachother. That's actually less a hint than
> it is a formal declaration of LET THE ONLINE MARIO KART TOURNAMENTS
> BEGIN!!!...next year.

Interesting. I just watched the "Reggie Jackson" interview, which was a
follow-up and clarification to the Iwata keynote presentation that I was
refering to. Interesting that he immiedietly jump into clarification of
how the wireless (and Revolution) will come into play. From the Iwata
keynote presentation, it seemed that Nintendo wasn't going to pursue an
attempt to use standard TCP/IP through wifi hotspots by his comment about
"keeping things simple, not having user required to enter SSIDs and WEP
keys, etc" but the Reggie interview states otherwise. Apparantly, he felt
compelled to immiedietly make the clarification, as the Iwata presentation
(which he refered to) left open questions regarding wifi. Reggie states
that "Metroid Prime: Hunters" will be WLAN, however Nintendo is pursuing
true internet gaming by the fourth quarter for the DS. From his language,
it also seems that connectivity will be possible through any wireless access
point -- however the online community will be routed through Nintendo's
central servers. (Similiar to XBox Live, it seems.) I imagine that
Nintendo wants centralized control in order to assure quality control.
(Unlike the PS2 "Wild West" online experience.) Most interesting -- the
service provided by Nintendo's central servers will be free!

Ok, I'm now very excited again!

Like you said, "LET THE ONLINE MARIO KART TOURNAMENTS BEGIN!"

Cheers,
-Eric
Anonymous
March 27, 2005 4:26:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

Eric wrote:
> Ok, I'm now very excited again!
>
> Like you said, "LET THE ONLINE MARIO KART TOURNAMENTS BEGIN!"
>
> Cheers,
> -Eric
>
>

Some people have suggested they will forego the internet in favor of
"base stations," a technology I don't fully comprehend but is used for
mobile phones. It would still mean a world-wide network however. And
as keyed up as I am about Karting online (especially since my brother
lives an hour and a half away), I know it would totally ruin my life.
Between Team Fortress 2 (which we had BETTER see at E3) and an online
Mario Kart, I'll never want to leave the house again. No, I don't have
a girlfriend, how'd you know?

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Anonymous
March 27, 2005 1:57:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

That's nice, but what about backwards compatibility with the N64, SNES,
and NES?


Mark
March 27, 2005 6:47:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

"Jacob Oost" <zork@columbus.rr.com> wrote in message

> Some people have suggested they will forego the internet in favor of
> "base stations," a technology I don't fully comprehend but is used for
> mobile phones. It would still mean a world-wide network however. And
> as keyed up as I am about Karting online (especially since my brother
> lives an hour and a half away), I know it would totally ruin my life.
> Between Team Fortress 2 (which we had BETTER see at E3) and an online
> Mario Kart, I'll never want to leave the house again. No, I don't have
> a girlfriend, how'd you know?

Perhaps the "base stations" would be wireless "access points" that are
tranceiving the Nintendo proprietary protocol? I could see a lot of
application for such a piece of hardware. Retail locations could use such
hardware to allow customers to download and play game demos on their DS
while they are at their location. I bet it also won't be long before
someone cracks the Nintendo proprietary protocol and figures out how to
tunnel it over the internet for "online play" of the WLAN-only games such as
"Metroid Prime: Hunters".

From the "Reggie interview" though, he clarified very clearly that,
beginning in the fourth quarter, Nintendo games will be released that will
allow play over the internet from "any existing wireless access point". I'm
interpreting this as meaning that they will support just standard vanilla
TCP/IP over 802.11b -- which is GREAT news! Actually, I think the DS
supports 802.11 (not 802.11b), which (depending on AP's configuration) might
not allow any AP to allow it to connect. I know with my wireless APs at
home (both are 802.11a, 802.11g/b) I can configure both to prevent 2 Mbits
802.11 clients from connecting. That might be a small obstacle when using
public "hot spots" with the DS. It'll be interesting to see how that plays
outs. 2 Mbits should be more than enough bandwidth for the DS though. PC
games worked onlike at 50 Kbits (dialup) for the longest time..

LOL, I hear ya about "Mario Kart Online". That could also play havoc on my
social life as well. I do have a fiance, but fortunetly she likes playing
games as much as I do. (She also has a DS.) She's more into RPG's though,
which I can't stand.

Cheers!
-Eric
Anonymous
March 28, 2005 2:17:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

Eric wrote:
> LOL, I hear ya about "Mario Kart Online". That could also play havoc on my
> social life as well. I do have a fiance, but fortunetly she likes playing
> games as much as I do. (She also has a DS.) She's more into RPG's though,
> which I can't stand.

Get yourself a copy of Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga. It will make
you interested in RPGs (at least, it did me, now I want to check out
Fire Emblem). It's not wholly turn-based nor is it wholly real-time, so
it kind of eases people like me who only play Zelda into the turn-based
RPGs.

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Anonymous
March 28, 2005 2:36:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

"Eric" <ericmau001a@hotmail.remove.com> wrote in
news:UTl1e.17729$rL3.7267@fe2.columbus.rr.com:

>> You don't have to be Sherlock Holmes to read between the lines here:
>> Internet play for DS & Revolution by 2006. Nintendo always drops
>> hints like this. First he mentions the DS will use a worldwide
>> online service "from any wi-fi hotspot" which I assume will include
>> home networks which are easy to obtain and run, and then a little
>> later mentions that Revolution will have built-in wi-fi capabilities
>> and gamers worldwide will be able to play with eachother. That's
>> actually less a hint than it is a formal declaration of LET THE
>> ONLINE MARIO KART TOURNAMENTS BEGIN!!!...next year.
>
> Interesting. I just watched the "Reggie Jackson" interview, which was
> a follow-up and clarification to the Iwata keynote presentation that I
> was refering to. Interesting that he immiedietly jump into
> clarification of how the wireless (and Revolution) will come into
> play. From the Iwata keynote presentation, it seemed that Nintendo
> wasn't going to pursue an attempt to use standard TCP/IP through wifi
> hotspots

Wifi is all well and good, but I would like to know: had anyone heard
anything about the Revolution having a standard Ethernet port? It'd be
nice to have the option to do a wired connection too.

--

Aaron J. Bossig

http://www.GodsLabRat.com
http://www.dvdverdict.com
Anonymous
March 28, 2005 6:00:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

sailormoon@naturecoast.net wrote:
> That's nice, but what about backwards compatibility with the N64, SNES,
> and NES?
>
>
> Mark
>

Oh, and an extra hundreds bucks onto the retail price for including the
necessary hardware.

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Anonymous
March 28, 2005 9:00:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

"Aaron J. Bossig" <linkvb06@SpammersWillBeExecuted.ptd.net> wrote in message
>
> Wifi is all well and good, but I would like to know: had anyone heard
> anything about the Revolution having a standard Ethernet port? It'd be
> nice to have the option to do a wired connection too.

Doesn't sound like it, does it? I think Nintendo is trying to give the
appearance of not having changed their mind--as if wireless online is
totally different from wired, which they've been badmouthing for so long
now.
Anonymous
March 28, 2005 9:00:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

"Leon Dexter" <leondexterNOSPAM@earthlink.net> wrote in
news:ZbM1e.774$x4.71@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net:

> "Aaron J. Bossig" <linkvb06@SpammersWillBeExecuted.ptd.net> wrote in
> message
>>
>> Wifi is all well and good, but I would like to know: had anyone
>> heard anything about the Revolution having a standard Ethernet port?
>> It'd be nice to have the option to do a wired connection too.
>
> Doesn't sound like it, does it? I think Nintendo is trying to give
> the appearance of not having changed their mind--as if wireless online
> is totally different from wired, which they've been badmouthing for so
> long now.

Yeah, a little nit like their "CDs are overrated" strategy,
only it makes less sense.

--

Aaron J. Bossig

http://www.GodsLabRat.com
http://www.dvdverdict.com
Anonymous
March 28, 2005 3:34:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

"Aaron J. Bossig" <linkvb06@SpammersWillBeExecuted.ptd.net> wrote in message

>
> Yeah, a little nit like their "CDs are overrated" strategy,
> only it makes less sense.

I still applaud their decision to go with carts. It was a decision based on
getting the best gameplay experience (at least in part), even though there
are certainly good points on both sides of that argument. Their anti-online
stance, though, is one of many bad-for-gameplay decisions that they've made
based on short-sighted business mentality. They used to look at the bigger
picture, but now they've become so profit-centric that it's cost them a lot
of marketshare, even though they've succeeded in remaining profitable.
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 12:31:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

"Leon Dexter" <leondexterNOSPAM@earthlink.net> wrote in
news:iZR1e.6388$H06.5011@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net:

>> Yeah, a little nit like their "CDs are overrated" strategy,
>> only it makes less sense.
>
> I still applaud their decision to go with carts. It was a decision
> based on getting the best gameplay experience (at least in part), even
> though there are certainly good points on both sides of that argument.

Well, based on their contracts with Sony, they really *couldn't* make
a CD system without screwing themselves over. They used carts and made
the best of it. I'm cool with that. I'm wondering why they didn't try
to make their own proprietary format, though.



--

Aaron J. Bossig

http://www.GodsLabRat.com
http://www.dvdverdict.com
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 3:24:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

Leon Dexter wrote:
> I still applaud their decision to go with carts. It was a decision based on
> getting the best gameplay experience (at least in part), even though there
> are certainly good points on both sides of that argument. Their anti-online
> stance, though, is one of many bad-for-gameplay decisions that they've made
> based on short-sighted business mentality. They used to look at the bigger
> picture, but now they've become so profit-centric that it's cost them a lot
> of marketshare, even though they've succeeded in remaining profitable.
>
>

I disagree; N-Sider (or was it NintendoSpin?) had a great article that
changed my mind about how I view Nintendo's online strategy this
generation. Hmm, maybe the article was on Nintendorks. Now I wish I
could remember. One of the key points was that as a percentage of the
user base, neither PS2 nor X-Box have had humongous successes in online
gaming this generation, how broadband technology isn't used widely
enough in the US yet, and how Nintendo is smart to see what works and
what doesn't, and come up with something better for the next generation.
Remember, Nintendo's been tinkering with network gaming since the NES
days, they've been experimenting for years.

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Anonymous
March 29, 2005 3:24:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

Jacob Oost <zork@columbus.rr.com> wrote in
news:vm02e.21645$rL3.13035@fe2.columbus.rr.com:

>
> I disagree; N-Sider (or was it NintendoSpin?) had a great article that
> changed my mind about how I view Nintendo's online strategy this
> generation. Hmm, maybe the article was on Nintendorks. Now I wish I
> could remember. One of the key points was that as a percentage of the
> user base, neither PS2 nor X-Box have had humongous successes in
> online gaming this generation,

Interesting... on what do they measure success? XBL is a *huge* selling
point for the X-Box, and on a personal level, it's pretty much my main
reason for having a PS2.

Even still, I'd much rather have an online Mario Kart or SSBM.

--

Aaron J. Bossig

http://www.GodsLabRat.com
http://www.dvdverdict.com
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 3:24:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

Jacob Oost <zork@columbus.rr.com> wrote in
news:tw42e.2783$lq2.223@fe1.columbus.rr.com:

> Aaron J. Bossig wrote:
>> Interesting... on what do they measure success? XBL is a *huge*
>> selling point for the X-Box, and on a personal level, it's pretty
>> much my main reason for having a PS2.
>>
>> Even still, I'd much rather have an online Mario Kart or SSBM.
>>
>
> MS is taking a loss on XBL, and only a fraction of X-Box users are
> subscribed to it. In fact, their entire home and entertainment
> division has lost over two billion dollars since the X-Box, because
> their costs are so freakishly high. They spend money like water in
> order to get marketshare and they seem to be plateauing at a fraction
> of Sony's user-base. First off, the X-Box is a very expensive piece
> of hardware, and when it was first released it must have cost *way*
> more than it was selling for (it cost $300, and just a video card from
> NVidia of similar capabilities was at least $400 at the time, not to
> mention the cpu and hd),

I seem to recall hearing at launch that MS didn't break even on the sale
of an X-Box until the user had bought seven games. I didn't see any
math to back it up, but it sure sounded right.


>and then they spend 375 million dollars for
> Rareware,

This wasn't a bad move, IMO, though I could have picked better companies
to buy.



--

Aaron J. Bossig

http://www.GodsLabRat.com
http://www.dvdverdict.com
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 6:54:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

"Jacob Oost" <zork@columbus.rr.com> wrote in message news:vm02e.21645

One of the key points was that as a percentage of the
> user base, neither PS2 nor X-Box have had humongous successes in online
> gaming this generation, how broadband technology isn't used widely
> enough in the US yet, and how Nintendo is smart to see what works and
> what doesn't, and come up with something better for the next generation.
> Remember, Nintendo's been tinkering with network gaming since the NES
> days, they've been experimenting for years.

Yes, but they've been openly badmouthing it as well, and that's just stupid.
They've also actively discouraged third-parties from including online
components to their games. There's no reason EA shouldn't make their
Gamecube games online-ready, when they make their PS2 games that way with no
help from Sony. The only exception is Phantasy Star, and Nintendo & SEGA
announced that back when Nintendo claimed they were working on an online
strategy.
Nintendo could have had an open "do what you want" online strategy like Sony
has--they don't support anything. But they've been hostile to the whole
idea, not just indifferent.
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 8:16:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

Leon Dexter wrote:
> Yes, but they've been openly badmouthing it as well, and that's just stupid.
> They've also actively discouraged third-parties from including online
> components to their games. There's no reason EA shouldn't make their
> Gamecube games online-ready, when they make their PS2 games that way with no
> help from Sony. The only exception is Phantasy Star, and Nintendo & SEGA
> announced that back when Nintendo claimed they were working on an online
> strategy.
> Nintendo could have had an open "do what you want" online strategy like Sony
> has--they don't support anything. But they've been hostile to the whole
> idea, not just indifferent.
>
>

You can't always go by what Nintendo says. It's always been their
policy to totally trash whatever they aren't currently using. This from
a company that's been experimenting with online gaming since the NES
days, and whose star designer has talked often about his interest in
network gaming? Yes, I know people are always throwing that Miyamoto
quote around where he says networking isn't anything new, but he's not
saying it's boring either. In plenty of interviews he's talked about
his excitement over the possibilities. Nintendo isn't stupid, they know
people want to play Animal Crossing and Mario Kart and Advance Wars online.

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Anonymous
March 30, 2005 6:48:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

"Jacob Oost" <zork@columbus.rr.com> wrote in message
news:whG1e.21186$rL3.5543@fe2.columbus.rr.com...
> Eric wrote:
>> LOL, I hear ya about "Mario Kart Online". That could also play havoc on
>> my
>> social life as well. I do have a fiance, but fortunetly she likes
>> playing
>> games as much as I do. (She also has a DS.) She's more into RPG's
>> though,
>> which I can't stand.
>
> Get yourself a copy of Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga. It will make you
> interested in RPGs (at least, it did me, now I want to check out Fire
> Emblem). It's not wholly turn-based nor is it wholly real-time, so it
> kind of eases people like me who only play Zelda into the turn-based RPGs.

You know I picked that up and just couldn't get into it...also, picked up
the Mario RPG ( Paper Mario ) for the cube and came to the conclusion that I
just do NOT like Mario RPGs. I liked Morrowind, loved Fable and most of the
other RPGs I've played though.

On the GBA, I find Pokemon to be an extremely enjoyable RPG once you get
past the 'cute factor'.
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 3:22:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

Aaron J. Bossig wrote:
> Having the Perfect Dark and other series as X-Box exclusives is nice.
> Not incredible, but nice.
>

Is it $375,000,001 nice? Because if not, then it was a mistake. Has
that game even come out yet or is it still in development. I honestly
couldn't care less about it. Supposing it makes Halo 2-style money, MS
will have broken even on their Rareware buy. :-)

> Rare was famous for taking their time with all their titles.

Yes, they took their time, and still managed to put out multiple hits a
year, they were Nintendo's own private EA. Now, they are a nobody. I
don't know what happened to Rare, but it was bad and I think Nintendo
was laughing all the way to the bank.

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Anonymous
March 31, 2005 5:03:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

"Aaron J. Bossig" <linkvb06@SpammersWillBeExecuted.ptd.net> wrote in message

> Having the Perfect Dark and other series as X-Box exclusives is nice.
> Not incredible, but nice.
> Rare was famous for taking their time with all their titles. Even
> though they might be slow now, I don't think MS will give them the
> same leeway Nintendo did. That could affect the quality of the games.

Perfect Dark and their other franchises haven't come out on the Xbox, so
their exclusivity isn't worth much yet.
And yes, Rare has usually been very slow at making games, but even so they
did manage to make 10 N64 titles during its 5-year lifespan. During the
Xbox's 3.5 years so far, they've managed to make 1 Xbox game (and 1 Gamecube
game). I think Microsoft is giving them a lot more leeway than Nintendo.
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 5:03:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

"Leon Dexter" <leondexterNOSPAM@earthlink.net> wrote in
news:y%H2e.2504$x4.2005@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net:


>> Having the Perfect Dark and other series as X-Box exclusives is nice.
>> Not incredible, but nice.
>> Rare was famous for taking their time with all their titles. Even
>> though they might be slow now, I don't think MS will give them the
>> same leeway Nintendo did. That could affect the quality of the
>> games.
>
> Perfect Dark and their other franchises haven't come out on the Xbox,
> so their exclusivity isn't worth much yet.
> And yes, Rare has usually been very slow at making games, but even so
> they did manage to make 10 N64 titles during its 5-year lifespan.
> During the Xbox's 3.5 years so far, they've managed to make 1 Xbox
> game (and 1 Gamecube game). I think Microsoft is giving them a lot
> more leeway than Nintendo.

Good points all around. I still think that the best move Microsoft could
have made would have been to buy companies with already-established
franchises: Sega, Capcom, Konami... even Atari! Having something gamers
already recognize on the system would have helped them a great deal.

But hey, I wasn't in charge. ;-)


--

Aaron J. Bossig

http://www.GodsLabRat.com
http://www.dvdverdict.com
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 7:45:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

"Aaron J. Bossig" <linkvb06@SpammersWillBeExecuted.ptd.net> wrote in message

> Good points all around. I still think that the best move Microsoft could
> have made would have been to buy companies with already-established
> franchises: Sega, Capcom, Konami... even Atari! Having something gamers
> already recognize on the system would have helped them a great deal.
>
> But hey, I wasn't in charge. ;-)

You usually can't buy a company unless they allow it. Microsoft tried to
buy both SEGA and Nintendo before launching the Xbox. And who knows who
else?
Anonymous
September 15, 2005 9:02:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.gamecube (More info?)

"Eric" <ericmau001a@hotmail.remove.com> wrote in
news:9Iz1e.20523$rL3.13937@fe2.columbus.rr.com:

>
> "Jacob Oost" <zork@columbus.rr.com> wrote in message
>
>> Some people have suggested they will forego the internet in favor of
>> "base stations," a technology I don't fully comprehend but is used
>> for mobile phones. It would still mean a world-wide network however.
>> And as keyed up as I am about Karting online (especially since my
>> brother lives an hour and a half away), I know it would totally ruin
>> my life. Between Team Fortress 2 (which we had BETTER see at E3) and
>> an online Mario Kart, I'll never want to leave the house again. No,
>> I don't have a girlfriend, how'd you know?
>
> Perhaps the "base stations" would be wireless "access points" that are
> tranceiving the Nintendo proprietary protocol? I could see a lot of
> application for such a piece of hardware. Retail locations could use
> such hardware to allow customers to download and play game demos on
> their DS while they are at their location. I bet it also won't be
> long before someone cracks the Nintendo proprietary protocol and
> figures out how to tunnel it over the internet for "online play" of
> the WLAN-only games such as "Metroid Prime: Hunters".

actually the only special protocol based communication that the DS makes
is the wireless single pak muliplayer gaming joinup

it's fully capable of using normal TCP-IP you just need to write a tiny
bit of code on the gameside to use it

the Revolution will be wifi capable and can communicate with the DS thru
special protocol (replacement for GC-GBA linkcable) and be able to do
WLAN for games that requir a DS cartridge & Revolution disc to link up,
think of pokemon stadium/colloseum type of gameplay

> From the "Reggie interview" though, he clarified very clearly that,
> beginning in the fourth quarter, Nintendo games will be released that
> will allow play over the internet from "any existing wireless access
> point". I'm interpreting this as meaning that they will support just
> standard vanilla TCP/IP over 802.11b -- which is GREAT news!
> Actually, I think the DS supports 802.11 (not 802.11b), which
> (depending on AP's configuration) might not allow any AP to allow it
> to connect. I know with my wireless APs at home (both are 802.11a,
> 802.11g/b) I can configure both to prevent 2 Mbits 802.11 clients from
> connecting. That might be a small obstacle when using public "hot
> spots" with the DS. It'll be interesting to see how that plays outs.
> 2 Mbits should be more than enough bandwidth for the DS though. PC
> games worked onlike at 50 Kbits (dialup) for the longest time..

the DS uses 2Mbit when in single pak multiplayer mode,
but from several documents it says that it is capable of atleast 10Mbit

> LOL, I hear ya about "Mario Kart Online". That could also play havoc
> on my social life as well. I do have a fiance, but fortunetly she
> likes playing games as much as I do. (She also has a DS.) She's more
> into RPG's though, which I can't stand.
>
> Cheers!
> -Eric
>
>
!